How to Force-Quit Misbehaving Apple Watch Apps

Apple Watch apps rarely misbehave, but if one becomes non-responsive or fails to refresh data, sometimes force-quitting the app and relaunching it can solve the issue.


Fortunately, it's a simple procedure. The following steps show you how it's done on Apple Watch models running watchOS 4 or watchOS 5.

  1. Open the misbehaving app on your Apple Watch, either by tapping its complication or selecting it from the honeycomb-style app menu/list view, so that it takes over the display.

  2. Now, press and hold the Side button.

  3. Release the Side button once the power down menu appears.

  4. Next, press and hold the Digital Crown. You can release it once the app is whisked away from view and you're returned to the watch face.
And that's all there is to it. The next time you launch the app in question, it will load up as if for the first time, and hopefully play nice again.

If the problem you're having still persists, try restarting your Apple Watch from the power down screen, or consider re-installing the related app on your iPhone.

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watchOS 4.3.1 Beta Hints at Future Support for Third-Party Apple Watch Faces

Apple may be considering allowing third-party developers to create custom Apple Watch faces, if a line of code discovered in the latest watchOS beta is anything to go by.

Historically, Apple has resisted allowing third-party developers to create and release custom watch faces for Apple Watch, instead electing to add to its stock options for watch faces in successive iterations of the device's operating system, such as the Siri and kaleidoscope watch faces introduced in watchOS 4.


However, a log message in watchOS 4.3.1 beta, unearthed by 9to5Mac, suggests Apple may be considering the possibility in a future version of Apple Watch software. As part of its NanoTimeKit framework which provides developer access to watch face components, the beta includes references to a currently inactive developer tools server that will likely allow communication with Xcode on macOS.

Within this portion of code is a log message that reads: "This is where the 3rd party face config bundle generation would happen."

Image via 9to5Mac

Whether or not Apple decides to implement the missing feature for watchOS 5 or in a later version is unknown, but the mere mention of third-party face configuration will likely be cause for hope for anyone longing for additional personalization beyond the existing color-adjustable stock options, custom "Photo" watch face, and accompanying third-party watch complications.

On the other hand, any such hope could prove misplaced given Apple's traditional reluctance to open up the most outward-facing aspects of its operating systems to third parties (such as the lock and home screens in iOS, for example). Apple imposes strict limits on changes to major interface elements out of a concern that they guarantee a high level of usability, stability and security, and it's hard to imagine the company casting aside those principles.

It's worth noting that Apple tends to reject third-party Apple Watch apps that closely duplicate existing functions, as per its developer guidelines, although whether watch faces would come under this provision remains unclear. At any rate, while Apple welcomes "creative ways of expressing time as an app interface", currently it does not allow apps that look like watch faces.

Meanwhile, rival smartwatch operating systems like FitbitOS and Android Wear have allowed users to install third-party watch faces on their devices for some time, but the design and usability standard on offer is highly variable and Apple isn't likely to warm to the idea unless it can enforce a consistent means of quality control.

Apple is expected to release the fifth version of watchOS and iOS 12 at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 4
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How to Add an Activity Type to Your Apple Watch Workout Options

When you open the Apple Watch Workout app, the main screen by default offers you 10 quick-start workout types that you can use to track your exercise. These include Walking, Running, Cycling, Elliptical, Rower, Stair stepper, HIIT, Swimming, and Wheelchair.

If you want to track a more specialized activity that isn't covered by these types, then you'll want to note the tenth option on the main screen, called Other. Selecting Other allows you to label your activity more accurately by choosing from over 60 pre-defined workout categories – you can find Apple's full list at the end of this article.

The neat thing about using the Other option is that once you've recorded a workout and given it a custom label, that workout type will subsequently appear in the main Workout screen as a quick-start option for the next time you need it.

How to Categorize an Activity in the Workout App


  1. Launch the stock Workout app on your Apple Watch.
  2. Using your watch's Crown, scroll down the list of activity types and tap the Other option to begin your workout, or tap the three circled dots at the upper right of the option's icon if you want to define a specific time or calorie goal before the workout starts.
  3. When you've completed the activity you want to track, swipe right on the metrics readout and tap End.

  4. Tap the grey Name Workout button near the top of the workout summary.
  5. Scroll through the alphabetical list and tap the category that best describes your workout. (Apple includes a convenient list of popular categories at the top.)
  6. With your activity now labeled, scroll down to the bottom of the workout summary screen and tap Done.
It's unclear whether using these additional categories affects the way Apple Watch's biometric sensors work (although we do know that using Other earns you the calorie or kilojoule equivalent of a brisk walk whenever sensor readings are unavailable). Either way, using specific labels ensures the Activity iOS app offers you a more informative exercise log, which makes it easier to filter to display specific workouts.


To learn how you can customize the Workout metrics for your chosen activity on Apple Watch, check out our how-to guide.

Full List of Apple Watch Workout Categories

  • American Football
  • Archery
  • Athletics
  • Australian Football
  • Badminton
  • Barre
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Bowling
  • Boxing
  • Climbing
  • Core Training
  • Cricket
  • Cross-Country Skiing
  • Cross Training
  • Curling
  • Dance
  • Downhill Skiing
  • Equestrian Sports
  • Fencing
  • Fishing
  • Flexibility
  • Functional Training
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Hand Cycling
  • Handball
  • HIIT (stands for High Intensity Interval Training)
  • Hiking
  • Hockey
  • Hunting
  • Jump Rope
  • Kickboxing
  • Lacrosse
  • Martial Arts
  • Mind & Body
  • Mixed Cardio
  • Paddling
  • Pilates
  • Play
  • Racquetball
  • Rolling
  • Rugby
  • Sailing
  • Skating
  • Snow Sports
  • Snowboarding
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Squash
  • Stairs
  • Step Training
  • Strength Training
  • Surfing
  • Table Tennis
  • Tai Chi
  • Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • USA Football
  • Volleyball
  • Water Fitness
  • Water Polo
  • Water Sports
  • Wrestling
  • Yoga


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