Apple Officially Obsoletes First MacBook Pro With a Retina Display

As expected, Apple's first MacBook Pro with a Retina display is now officially classed as "obsolete" worldwide, just over eight years after its release.


In a support document, Apple notes that obsolete products are no longer eligible for hardware service, with "no exceptions." This means that any mid-2012 Retina ‌MacBook Pro‌ 15-inch models still out there that require a battery or other repairs will no longer be accepted by Apple.

The only alternatives are to follow one of iFixit's many do-it-yourself repair guides, or to make enquiries at an independent repair shop, although many do not use official Apple parts.

When the ‌MacBook Pro‌ with Retina display was revealed at WWDC 2012, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller called it "a breakthrough in display engineering" and claimed there had "never been a notebook this gorgeous."


Apart from being the first ‌MacBook Pro‌ to boast a Retina display, the 2012 model had a much slimmer design than previous models. This was made possible by Apple removing the built-in Ethernet port and optical disc drive for CDs/DVDs. It still featured pairs of Thunderbolt and USB-A ports, an HDMI port, and an SD card slot, however.
Related Roundup: MacBook Pro

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Apple’s First MacBook Pro With a Retina Display Will Become ‘Obsolete’ in 30 Days

If you are still hanging on to a Mid 2012 model of the 15-inch MacBook Pro with a Retina display, and require a new battery or other repairs, be sure to book an appointment with a service provider as soon as possible.


In an internal memo today, obtained by MacRumors, Apple has indicated that this particular MacBook Pro model will be marked as "obsolete" worldwide on June 30, 2020, just over eight years after its release. In a support document, Apple notes that obsolete products are no longer eligible for hardware service, with "no exceptions."

Apple already classified the 2012 MacBook Pro as "vintage" in 2018, but it has still continued to service the notebook as part of a pilot program, subject to parts availability. With the 2012 MacBook Pro transitioning to "obsolete" status at the end of this month, it would appear that the notebook will no longer be eligible for any official repairs.

Of course, if you own a 2012 ‌MacBook Pro‌, there is nothing stopping you from following one of iFixit's many do-it-yourself repair guides. Independent repair shops are another avenue, although many do not use official Apple parts.

In addition to being the first ‌MacBook Pro‌ with a Retina display, the 2012 model had a much slimmer design compared to previous models, after Apple removed the built-in Ethernet port and optical disc drive for CDs/DVDs. It still had a wide array of I/O, however, including pairs of Thunderbolt and USB-A ports, an HDMI port, and an SD card slot.
Related Roundup: MacBook Pro

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Apple Adds Some 2013 and 2014 MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Models to Vintage Products List

A little later than expected, Apple has added the following 2013 and 2014 models of the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro to its vintage and obsolete products list:
  • ‌MacBook Air‌ (11-inch, Mid 2013)

  • ‌MacBook Air‌ (13-inch, Mid 2013)

  • ‌MacBook Air‌ (11-inch, Early 2014)

  • ‌MacBook Air‌ (13-inch, Early 2014)

  • ‌MacBook Pro‌ (13-inch, Mid 2014)

Also today, Apple added the iPod touch (5th generation) to its vintage products, defined as those that have not been manufactured for more than five but less than seven years. Devices on the list are no longer be eligible for service at a Genius Bar or Apple Authorized Service Providers.

The fifth-generation ‌iPod touch‌ was released on October 11, 2012, with more color options than earlier models, offering silver, pink, yellow, blue, and PRODUCT(RED). The ‌iPod touch‌ (5th generation) was officially discontinued by Apple on July 15, 2015, with the release of its successor, the ‌iPod touch‌ (6th generation).

An internal memo obtained by MacRumors at the beginning of last month revealed Apple's plans to obsolete ‌the above Mac products by the end of April.
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Apple Adding Some 2013 and 2014 MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Models to Vintage Products List at End of April

In an internal memo obtained by MacRumors, Apple has indicated that the following 2013 and 2014 models of the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro will be added to its vintage and obsolete products list on April 30:
  • MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2013)

  • MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2013)

  • MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2014)

  • MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2014)

  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2014)
Apple defines vintage products as those that were last manufactured more than five years ago. While vintage products were previously ineligible for service, Apple says vintage Macs remain eligible for hardware service at Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers, but only if repair parts are available, or if required by law.
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Apple Classifies Early 2013 21.5-inch iMac as Obsolete

Apple has added the Early 2013 21.5-inch iMac to its vintage and obsolete products list. The model of iMac is now classified by the company as vintage in the United States and Turkey, and obsolete in the rest of the world.


Apple defines vintage products as those that have not been manufactured for more than five but less than seven years. Macs and other products on the vintage and obsolete list are generally no longer eligible for hardware service at a Genius Bar or Apple Authorized Service Providers.

That being said, also-obsolete Late 2012 model iMacs are currently eligible for Apple's pilot program that allows for repairs to continue into the vintage period, subject to parts availability. It's not clear if the Early 2013 model 21.5-inch iMac will also come under the pilot program, but Apple has expanded it to include additional Macs and other Apple devices in the past.

The Early 2013 21.5-inch iMac was originally only available to educational institutions, taking advantage of a cheaper dual-core Intel Core i3 processor and integrated graphics to offer pricing of $1099, which was $200 less than the entry-level pricing for the consumer 2.15-inch iMac models Apple was selling at the time. The education-only iMac, which carries a model number of ME699LL/A, also included just 4GB of RAM and a 500GB hard drive.


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Apple Adds Eight-Year-Old iPad 2 Models to Vintage and Obsolete Products List

As expected, Apple has added all iPad 2 models to its vintage and obsolete products list.


Apple defines vintage products as those that have not been manufactured for more than five but less than seven years. Devices on the list are no longer be eligible for service at a Genius Bar or Apple Authorized Service Providers.

The only exceptions are in California and Turkey, where due to local laws, Apple will continue to service the iPad 2 until March 2021. From that date, the iPad 2 will finally go from "vintage" to "obsolete" worldwide.

The iPad 2 was originally launched in March 2011 and continued to be sold by Apple as a lower-cost option until March 2014. The big-bezeled iPad 2 featured a 9.7-inch display with 132 PPI, an A5 chip, and a 0.7-megapixel rear camera. It also had a 30-pin dock connector.

An internal memo obtained by MacRumors last month revealed Apple's plans to obsolete iPad 2 models by the end of April.


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Apple Adding iPad 2 to Vintage and Obsolete Products List on April 30

Apple will be adding all iPad 2 models to its vintage and obsolete products list on April 30, according to an internal memo obtained by MacRumors.


Apple defines vintage products as those that were last manufactured more than five years ago. The iPad 2, originally released in March 2011, lived on as a lower-cost option until March 2014, complete with a 9.7-inch display with just 132 PPI, an A5 chip, and a whopping 0.7-megapixel rear camera.

What this means is that the iPad 2 will no longer be eligible for service at the Genius Bar or Apple Authorized Service Providers as of the end of the month. It's pretty impressive that this is just happening now, considering that the iPad 2 is over eight years old. It even has a 30-pin dock connector still.

The only exceptions will be in California and Turkey, where due to local laws, Apple will continue to service the iPad 2 until March 2021. At the time, the iPad 2 will finally go from "vintage" to "obsolete" worldwide.


This article, "Apple Adding iPad 2 to Vintage and Obsolete Products List on April 30" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Adding Late 2012 iMacs to Vintage and Obsolete Products Pilot Program at End of January

In an internal memo distributed to Apple Authorized Service Providers, obtained by MacRumors, Apple has indicated that Late 2012 model 21.5-inch and 27-inch iMacs will be added to its vintage and obsolete products list on January 30.


Vintage and obsolete products are typically no longer eligible for repairs or replacement parts from Apple or Apple Authorized Service Providers, but the memo states Late 2012 model iMacs will be eligible for Apple's pilot program that will permit extended service through January 30, 2021 worldwide, subject to parts availability.

Other products in the pilot program include the iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, Mid 2012 models of the MacBook Air and Mac Pro, and Mid 2012 to Early 2013 models of the MacBook Pro. The program began in January 2018 and was expanded in August.

Vintage products are those that have not been manufactured for more than five years, according to Apple.

Related Roundup: iMac
Buyer's Guide: iMac (Don't Buy)

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Apple Adding iPhone 5 and Additional Macs to Pilot Program Allowing Repairs of Select ‘Vintage’ Products

Normally, an Apple product becomes vintage once five years have passed since it was last manufactured, meaning that Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers (AASPs) will no longer repair or service the product.


In late January, however, Apple launched a pilot program that permits Apple Stores and AASPs to continue servicing select vintage products, subject to parts availability. The program started in the United States and Turkey with the Mid 2011 iMac and expanded worldwide with the 2012 MacBook Air in August.

Now, Apple is further expanding the program to include the iPhone 5, which became vintage on Wednesday. In an internal document, Apple says Apple Stores and AASPs worldwide are authorized to continue servicing the CDMA variant of the device through October 31, 2020, and the GSM variant through December 30, 2020.

Apple's internal document, obtained by MacRumors from multiple sources, also outlines other soon-to-be vintage iPhones and Macs that will also be added to the pilot program at various dates throughout the remainder of this year:

Effective November 30, 2018:
Effective December 30, 2018:
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Retina, Late 2012)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Retina, Early 2013)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Retina, Mid 2012)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Retina, Early 2013)
  • Mac Pro (Mid 2012)
If parts are unavailable for a specific repair for these vintage products, Apple Stores and AASPs are instructed to decline service. This is a pilot program to begin with, so it is subject to change or end at any time.


The exact reason for the pilot program is unclear, beyond Apple apparently having a surplus of service parts for these specific vintage products. Apple's internal document states that inventory of service parts will not be replenished, so repairs under the pilot program are certainly not guaranteed.


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Apple Officially Obsoletes iPhone 5, Ending Repair Support

Apple has updated its vintage and obsolete products list to include the iPhone 5, six years after the smartphone's launch.

The iPhone 5 is now classified by the company as vintage in the United States and Turkey, and obsolete in the rest of the world. The addition was spotted by Japanese blog Mac Otakara.


Apple defines vintage products as those that have not been manufactured for more than five but less than seven years. Macs and other products on the vintage and obsolete list are generally no longer eligible for hardware service.

The iPhone 5 introduced some major design changes to Apple's smartphone lineup when it was announced in September 2012.

New features included a lighter aluminum-based body, a taller screen with a nearly 16:9 aspect ratio, LTE support, and Apple's A6 system-on-chip.

The iPhone 5 was also the first Apple smartphone to include a Lightning port, replacing the 30-pin design used by previous iPhone models.


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