Tweetbot for iOS Gains Support for New 11 and 12.9-Inch iPad Pro Models

Tapbots today updated popular iOS Twitter client Tweetbot to version 5.0.5, adding support for Apple's newly announced iPad Pro models.

On the new 11 and 12.9-inch iPad Pros, the updated Tweetbot app will no longer display black bars at the top and bottom, as demonstrated in the screenshot below.


It's a much nicer viewing experience on Apple's newest tablets, with Tweetbot able to take advantage of the full edge-to-edge display.

Tweetbot for Mac was also recently updated, with Tapbots introducing an option to match the theme to the operating system setting on Mojave, turning on the darker theme automatically when Dark Mode is activated. Also new is GIF support in the compose window for the Mac version of the Tweetbot app.

Tweetbot for iOS can be downloaded from the App Store for $4.99. [Direct Link]

Tweetbot for Mac can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for $9.99. [Direct Link]


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Tweetbot 5 for iOS Now Available With Refreshed Look, Dark Mode, and GIPHY Support

The newest version of the popular Tweetbot Twitter app for iOS devices launched this morning, introducing a revamped look for the app along with several new features.

Tweetbot 5's new look better matches the redesigned Mac version of Tweetbot that was introduced back in May, with redesigned profiles, tweet status details, timeline, and more. The app also adopts the new Tweetbot app logo that first debuted for Mac.


The updated version of the iOS app includes a revamped Dark Mode that looks great on Apple's lineup of OLED iPhones, and GIFs and videos can now be set to autoplay. Autoplay is turned on when updating, but can be adjusted within the settings of the app.


Built-in support for GIF service GIPHY adds a new GIF button to the compose window for quickly searching for and then adding a GIF to a tweet. Descriptions can be added to an image when creating a tweet, and Tapbots has added haptic feedback support.


Full release notes for the update are below:
- GIF support in compose view (Powered by Giphy).
- Redesigned profiles.
- Redesigned tweet status details.
- New iconography and app icon.
- Optimized dark theme for OLED displays.
- Support for haptic feedback.
- Auto video playback in the timeline (which can be disabled in the settings).
- Ability to add descriptions to images when composing.
Tweetbot can be downloaded from the App Store for $4.99. The new update is free for existing users. [Direct Link]


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Twitter Explains API Changes to Employees as Limits for Third-Party Apps Go Live

Twitter's API changes went live today, disabling key features for third-party apps like Tweetbot and Twitterific.

The new API removes timeline streaming, preventing third-party apps from refreshing timelines automatically, and it limits push notifications and other features. Twitter is also charging exorbitant fees for access to its new activity APIs, with access starting at $2,899 per month for up to 250 accounts.


All third-party Twitter apps are affected by these changes. Tapbots yesterday updated the Tweetbot for iOS app to cripple multiple features popular with Tweetbot users. Timeline streaming over Wi-Fi is no longer available, for example, which means Twitter timelines will now refresh more slowly.

Push notifications for Mentions and Direct Messages are delayed by several minutes, and push notifications for likes, retweets, follows, and quotes have been disabled entirely. The Activity and Stats tabs, which were reliant on now-deprecated activity APIs, have been removed from the app, and because the Apple Watch app was heavily dependent on Activity data, it too has been eliminated.

Similar changes were introduced in Twitterrific in July, and as of today, the Twitterrific app is no longer able to receive and display native notifications. Twitterrific's Today center widget and Apple Watch app relied on these features, and have been removed.

Twitterrific recommends Twitter users download the official Twitter app to receive their notifications, while using the Twitterrific app for everything else.

As the changes went live, Twitter today sent out a company-wide email to employees that starts out by acknowledging the huge impact that third-party Twitter clients have had on growing the Twitter service before pointing towards "technical and business constraints" that prevent it from continuing to offer the APIs necessary to keep these apps working as before.
Today, we will be publishing a blog post about our priorities for investing in Twitter client experiences. I wanted to share some insight into how we reached these decisions and how we're thinking about 3rd party clients moving forward.

First, some history: 3rd party clients have had a notable impact on the Twitter service and the products we built. Independent developers built the first Twitter client for Mac and the first native app for iPhone. These clients pioneered product features we all know and love about Twitter such as mute, the pull-to-refresh gesture, and many more.

We love that developers build experiences on our APIs to push our service, technology, and the public conversation forward. We deeply respect the time, energy, and passion they've put into building amazing things using Twitter.

However, we haven't always done a good job of being straightforward with developers about the decisions we make regarding 3rd party clients. In 2011, we told developers (in an email) not to build apps that mimic the core Twitter experience. In 2012, we announced changes to our developer policies intended to make these limitations clearer by capping the number of users allowed for a 3rd party client. And, in the years following those announcements, we've told developers repeatedly that our roadmap for our APIs does not prioritize client use cases -- even as we've continued to maintain a couple specific APIs used heavily by these clients and quietly granted user cap exceptions to the clients that needed them.

It's time to make the hard decision to end support for these legacy APIs -- acknowledging that some aspects of these apps would be degraded as a result. Today, we are facing technical and business constraints we can't ignore. The User Streams and Site Streams APIs that serve core functions of many of these clients have been in a "beta" state for more than 9 years, and are built on a technology stack we no longer support. We're not changing our rules, or setting out to "kill" 3rd party clients; but we are killing, out of operational necessity, some of the legacy APIs that power some features of those clients. In addition, it hasn't been realistic for us to invest in building a totally new service to replace all of the functionality of these APIs, which are used by less than 1% of Twitter developers.

We've heard feedback from our customers about the pain this causes. We review #BreakingMyTwitter quite often and have spoken with many of the developers of major 3rd party clients to understand their needs and concerns. We're committed to understanding why people hire 3rd party clients over our own apps, and we're going to try to do better with communicating these changes honestly and clearly to developers.

We know we have a lot of work to do. This change is a hard, but important step forward. Thank you for working with us to get there.
Twitter has continually said that just 1 percent of Twitter developers use its now-deprecated APIs, but as these changes seem to impact most of the major Twitter clients, it's not clear how the 1 percent figure is being calculated.

As TechCrunch points out, Twitter's email insists that the APIs were "legacy technology" that needed to be eliminated for "operational necessity," but it's Twitter, not an outside force, that has refused to maintain or redevelop the APIs third-party apps are using or transition existing apps over to the new API platform.


Twitter has further explained its decision to remove the APIs in a blog post that says the "best Twitter experience" it can provide is through its own "owned and operated Twitter for iOS and Android apps, as well as desktop and mobile twitter.com."


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Tweetbot Removes Timeline Streaming, Activity and Stats Tab, and Push Notifications for Some Features Ahead of Twitter Changes

Ahead of upcoming Twitter changes set to be implemented tomorrow, Tapbots has released an updated version of its Tweetbot app for iOS devices, which removes several features.

Timeline streaming over WiFi has been disabled, and within the iOS app, timelines will refresh every one to two minutes instead. We've been using them Tweetbot for iOS app in a beta capacity with these changes implemented, and while it's not a huge change, the delay is noticeable.


Push notifications for Mentions and Direct Messages are also delayed by a few minutes, and push notifications for likes, retweets, follows, and quotes have been disabled. Tapbots says it is, however, investigating re-adding some of these push notifications in the future.

The Activity and Stats tabs have been removed from the app, and because the Apple Watch app was heavily dependent on Activity data, it too has been eliminated.

Tapbots says that it is sorry that the changes have to be implemented, but it Twitter has decided to eliminate certain features provided to third-party apps without providing alternatives.
On August 16th Twitter will disable parts of their public interface that we use in Tweetbot. Because Twitter has chosen not to provide alternatives to these interfaces we have been forced to disable or degrade certain features. We're sorry about this, but unfortunately this is totally out of our control.
Other third-party Twitter clients, such as Twitterrific, have also had to remove the same features that have been disabled in Tweetbot because of Twitter's new limitations on third-party apps.

Twitter is requiring Twitter clients to pay for Premium or Enterprise accounts to access certain features, and timeline streaming has been deprecated entirely.

Tapbots has not yet updated Tweetbot for Mac, but changes should be coming to the Mac app soon as well.

Tweetbot for iOS can be downloaded from the App Store for $4.99. [Direct Link]


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Tapbots Launches Tweetbot 3 for Mac With Redesigned Interface, New Features

Tapbots is today launching Tweetbot 3, a new and updated version of its popular Tweetbot for Mac app.

Tweetbot 3 features a revamped interface that was rewritten from the ground up for the Mac. Compared to Tweetbot 2, the new app features a cleaner interface with more white space, persistent icons for replying, retweeting, liking, profile options, and more, and an overall cleaner look.


With the new timeline design, there are single-click tools for muting an account, blocking an account, or filing a report with Twitter so there is no need to go to a person's profile or open a profile in Safari to perform these tasks.

When viewing details for a particular tweet, there are now persistent icons that enable one-click replies, retweets, and likes for existing replies without needing to hover over the tweet.

At the left side of the app, there's a collapsible side bar that offers easier access to your follower count, lists, direct message conversations, and profile options. While the bar is expanded by default, pulling it to the left will collapse it back down so it's similar to the current Tweetbot 2 interface.


The new one-click button for composing a tweet is now located at the bottom right of the app rather than the top right, and it offers quick access to images, location, and emojis. Mentions and Activity notifications have been merged into one single "Notifications" tab, but there's still an option to view these separately if so desired.

It's much easier to work with multiple columns in the new version of the app. Rather than clicking and choosing "open in new column," you can simply drag from the right hand side of the app to create a column, with a drop down menu at the top available to choose what the column displays. Closing a column is as simple as dragging it back to the left.


There's also a new option for allowing media like GIFs and videos to autoplay right in the timeline, which is enabled by default (but you can disable it in the settings section of the app), and there are new one-click options at the top of the app for saving lists, searches, and DM conversations, plus an option to disable in-line media previews.

Both light and dark themes are available through the preferences portion of the app, and there are more options for customizing font size. Tweetbot 3 users will also notice that the app has an entirely redesigned icon, going from the standard square-shaped Tweetbot 2 bird to a rounded bird icon.


Customers who are planning on purchasing Tweetbot 3 may be concerned about some upcoming changes that Twitter is planning to make to its APIs. Twitter initially planned to introduce these changes on June 19, which would have involved deprecating certain APIs used for streaming purposes, but has indefinitely delayed them following developer outcry.

If and when Twitter does opt to disable these APIs, Tapbots says that Tweetbot 3 and other apps will continue to function, but a few features could be slower or removed. Twitter does, however, have replacement APIs, and should access to these be provided to developers, all functionality that is being deprecated will be able to be re-added to Tweetbot.

Tapbots says that the worse case scenario on Mac is that notifications for likes and retweets will not be displayed, and notifications for tweets, mentions, quotes, DMs, and Follows could be delayed by one to two minutes.

Tweetbot 3 is available from the Mac App Store for $9.99. It is a paid upgrade from the existing Tweetbot and Tweetbot 2 apps, so existing Tweetbot users who want to use the new version of the app will need to purchase it. [Direct Link]


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Upcoming Twitter Changes to Disable Key Features in Third-Party Apps

Twitter is making changes to its API on June 19, and third-party Twitter clients are worried about the impact and Twitter's lack of communication about the issue.

The developers behind popular third-party Twitter apps that include Tweetbot, Twitterrific, Talon, and Tweetings today teamed up to warn users about the upcoming changes and to hopefully spur Twitter to action.


On June 19, Twitter plans to remove several streaming service APIs that are used by third-party apps. Disabling these APIs will prevent third-party Twitter apps from sending push notifications and refreshing Twitter timelines automatically.
If you use an app like Talon, Tweetbot, Tweetings, or Twitterrific, there is no way for its developer to fix these issues.

We are incredibly eager to update our apps. However, despite many requests for clarification and guidance, Twitter has not provided a way for us to recreate the lost functionality. We've been waiting for more than a year.
Twitter is replacing its current streaming APIs with a new Account Activity API, which is in beta testing, but third-party developers have not been given access. With access to the Account Activity APIs, third-party Twitter clients say they might be able to enable some push notifications, but Twitter has also provided no detail on pricing. Automatic refresh of the timeline is set to be disabled entirely.
Automatic refresh of your timeline just won't work: there is no web server on your mobile device or desktop computer that Twitter can contact with updates. Since updating your timeline with other methods is rate-limited by Twitter, you will see delays in real-time updates during sporting events and breaking news.
The developers behind Tweetbot, Twitterrific, Talon, and Tweetings are asking customers to contact the @TwitterDev account to correct the situation and to use the #BreakingMyTwitter hashtag to spread awareness.


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Tweetbot for iOS Gains Support for New 280-Character Tweet Limit

Just a day after Twitter officially rolled out support for its new 280-character limit for tweets, popular third-party Twitter client Tweetbot has been updated with support for the new feature.

Tweetbot users who have Tweetbot for iOS installed will now be able to take full advantage of the new character limit once the app update has been installed. Tweetbot has not yet updated Tweetbot for Mac with support for the new feature, but an update should be coming soon.

Twitter started testing the new 280-character limit in late September before rolling it out globally yesterday. The updated character limit is available for all languages with the exception of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, as those are not affected by what Twitter calls "cramming."

According to Twitter, during the testing period, most people with access to the 280 character limit continued to share tweets that featured under 140 characters, so the company does not believe the new limit will "substantially change" timelines for most users.

Right now, since the feature is new, there is an uptick in the number of people testing the 280-character limit, but Twitter believes that will die down within a couple of weeks.

Tweetbot can be downloaded from the App Store for $4.99. [Direct Link]


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Popular iOS Twitter Client Tweetbot 4 Gets First Discount of 2017, Dropping From $10 to $5

Tweetbot is one of the most popular third-party Twitter clients, and this week developer Tapbots has dropped the price of the latest version of the app -- Tweetbot 4 -- by 50 percent, from $9.99 to $4.99. The last time a similar price drop happened was December 2016, so the app had yet to see a discount throughout 2017.

It's not clear how long the discount will last, but given the length of previous sales (around 4-5 days), it should stick around until October 7-8.


The app lets you mute tweets by hashtags, users, sources, or keywords, includes an automatic night mode that turns on or off depending on the brightness of your iPhone's screen, and has basic Twitter features like direct messages and lists. Tweetbot 4 also retains Twitter's old reverse chronological timeline order, and doesn't surface cards that suggest Tweets you may have missed or that you might like.

Additionally today, Fry's has marked down BeatsX Earphones to a notable low of $94, in comparison to the traditional retail price of $150. You can purchase the earphones in Grey, Blue, White, and Black, and the discount will appear once the item is placed in your cart. This deal ends tomorrow, October 7.

Nodus Access Case (left) and Shell Case (right)

Nodus has a discount on iPhone X cases, offering 10 percent off the Access Case and Shell Case when you pre-order each accessory ahead of their respective late October and early November delivery estimates. The Access Case is a leather portfolio case with room for credit cards, while the Shell Case lets you attach your iPhone to any surface using the included micro dock accessory.

We just launched our new giveaway for the week as well, so head here for a chance to win a TS3 Thunderbolt Station 3 dock from CalDigit. For more of this week's deals, including a one-day-only discount on the UE MEGABOOM right now at Best Buy, be sure to head over to our Deals Roundup.

Related Roundup: Apple Deals

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