Top 10 Apple TV Remote Tips and Tricks

When Apple released the fourth-generation Apple TV in 2015, it also included a new Siri Remote with the set-top box (although in some regions Apple kept the original name "Apple TV Remote" due to Siri not working in those territories).


The redesigned remote features dual microphones for Siri support as well as a glass touch surface for navigating the tvOS interface by swiping, tapping, and scrubbing to fast forward/rewind content. The remote also has a Menu button, a Home button (with a TV icon on it), a Siri button, a Play/Pause button, and a Volume Up/Down button.

With the release of the Apple TV 4K in 2017, Apple tweaked the remote design to add a raised white ring around the Menu button, making it easier to identify the correct orientation of the remote by both touch and feel. The buttons and operation of the remote, however, remained unchanged, and the revised remote is also included with new units of the fourth-generation Apple TV.

In this guide, we've collected 10 of our favorite tips for controlling features of tvOS using the Apple TV Remote included with the fourth generation Apple TV and the latest fifth-generation Apple TV 4K. Keep reading and you might well discover a new trick or two.
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4K Apple TV Could Feature A10X Fusion Chip and 3GB of RAM

Apple's upcoming fifth-generation 4K Apple TV will be powered by an A10X Fusion chip and 3GB of RAM, according to details unearthed in the device's firmware.

Developer Steve Troughton-Smith made the claim this morning in a tweet, after going through code in the final software builds that were at the center of a major Apple leak over the weekend.


Apple's current fourth-generation Apple TV, originally released in 2015, runs on an A8 chip coupled with 2GB of RAM. But the boost in performance provided by the A10 series – which also powers the latest iPad Pro models – suggests Apple could see a bigger role for its next set-top box, possibly expanding beyond 4K content.

On the other hand, Troughton-Smith believes Apple may have chosen the A10X Fusion processor to play 4K content at 60 frames per second, which would make sense given that the iPhone X is expected to record 4K video at 60fps.

Even if that is the primary reason for including such a powerful chip in the next Apple TV, users can expect significant performance gains across the board, while tvOS game developers will be rubbing their hands together at the prospect of leveraging the processor's power to create immersive 3D experiences to rival modern console titles.


The 3GB of RAM would bring the extra working memory needed to stream 4K HDR content, which is expected to become available both in the iTunes Store and from third-party content providers, but the additional RAM may also factor into any role the Apple TV has in Apple's augmented reality future plans.

The ARKit developer framework is already turning out to be a major feature of Apple's upcoming iPhone 8 and iPhone X devices, which are set to be announced on Tuesday alongside a new Apple TV and Apple Watch, during a media event at the Steve Jobs Theater in Apple Park, Cupertino. Several details about Apple's iPhone X have already been found in the iOS 11 GM, including information on Face ID setup, Animoji, the split status bar, the A11 processor, and the device's design.

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