Apple Watch Series 6 Could Feature Touch ID Fingerprint Sensor, Pulse Oximetry and Sleep Tracking Support

The upcoming Apple Watch Series 6 set to be released this fall could include a Touch ID fingerprint sensor built into the crown of the device, according to Israeli site The Verifier, which cites "senior sources" who have worked with its staff for a "number of years" as the source of the rumor.


It's not clear how the alleged ‌Touch ID‌ fingerprint sensor would be implemented, as the Digital Crown is already used for capturing an ECG in the current ‌Apple Watch‌ models with an included electrode.

A ‌Touch ID‌ fingerprint sensor sounds like somewhat of an odd feature to add to the ‌Apple Watch‌, but it could potentially alleviate the need for a PIN when putting on the ‌Apple Watch‌ in the morning. The ‌Apple Watch‌ already unlocks when the iPhone is unlocked, but unlocking it on a standalone basis requires a numerical code to be entered.

The ‌Apple Watch‌ itself also uses skin contact as a biometric authentication option for Apple Pay payments and other functions. In the ‌Apple Watch‌ Series 7, The Verifier claims that the ‌Touch ID‌ fingerprint sensor will be relocated to the display, but two drastic ‌Touch ID‌ tweaks in two years may be questionable as Apple tends to make fewer changes to ‌Apple Watch‌ hardware.

Apple's next-generation ‌Apple Watch‌ is also said to include an improved battery, broader support for LTE, and support for WiFi 6.

The Verifier also outlines some of the features coming to watchOS 7, many of which we've heard before. watchOS 7 will allegedly include a "fresh design," updates to built-in apps, and improvements to Siri, with little other information included.

Echoing other rumors, The Verifier says Apple is working on pulse ox monitoring for the ‌Apple Watch‌ and sleep tracking capabilities. Pulse oximetry support would allow the ‌Apple Watch‌ to measure the oxygen levels in the blood, making sure a person's oxygen saturation does not drop to a dangerous level, which can be indicative of a serious and immediate problem that needs to be addressed.

Sleep tracking is a feature that we've heard a lot about in recent months, with Apple expected to introduce sleep monitoring capabilities in the near future. Sleep tracking would measure metrics like time asleep and sleep quality.

According to The Verifier, watchOS 7 will be compatible with the ‌Apple Watch‌ Series 3 and later, with Apple planning to drop support for the Apple Watch Series 2 and earlier.

The Verifier last week claimed that tvOS 14 will feature a new Kids Mode with content geared towards children and a Screen Time feature to measure time spent watching TV.

In the past, The Verifier has shared some questionable information that has not panned out, so it's worth viewing these rumors with some skepticism until confirmed by another source.
Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 6
Buyer's Guide: Apple Watch (Neutral)

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Apple Allegedly Adding Kids Mode and Screen Time to tvOS, Launching Apple TV With Up to 128GB Storage

Apple is planning to add new features like Kids Mode and Screen Time options to a future version of tvOS, according to Israeli site The Verifier.


Kids Mode would allow children to watch Apple TV content aimed at children, with parental control options that will let parents restrict the content that is available. Parents will be able to block TV shows, movies, and apps that are not age appropriate, and will be able to set Screen Time limits.

Speaking of Screen Time, The Verifier says that Apple will bring Screen Time features to the ‌Apple TV‌, allowing people to keep track of how much time they're spending watching television. It will work for various apps and games, listing the amount of time spent using each app, as with iOS.

There are also a couple of hardware claims, which we've heard before. Apple is said to be working on a new ‌Apple TV‌ that features an A11 or A12 processor and 64/128GB storage options, up from the current 32/64GB.

The Verifier believes Apple will hold an event in November or December to announce the ‌Apple TV‌, which is a part of this rumor that sounds unlikely. Signs of a new ‌Apple TV‌ have been showing up in versions of iOS for months now, which suggests we'll see it sooner than late 2020. Apple also does not typically hold events in the months of November and December.

The Verifier claims that its news comes from "senior sources" that have been working with its staff for a "number of years," but the site's past claims have been questionable, so it's worth viewing this information with some skepticism until confirmed by a secondary source.

The site was accurate about Night Mode coming to the 2019 iPhone lineup, though that was a reasonable guess. It was very wrong on some macOS Catalina predictions, having suggested the software would include a Shortcuts app, split screen support for four windows, and an iOS-like Control Center, none of which was released.

Some past tvOS predictions have been accurate, though, with The Verifier leaking picture-in-picture and multiple users in tvOS ahead of launch.
Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 13
Buyer's Guide: Apple TV (Don't Buy)

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Questionable Rumor Suggests iOS 13 Will Drop Compatibility for iPhone 5s Through iPhone 6s

A questionable and unconfirmed rumor from Israeli site The Verifier suggests that Apple's iOS 13 update, expected to be previewed this summer at the Worldwide Developers Conference, will drop support for a number of iPhones and iPads.

The site says iOS 13 will be unavailable on the iPhone 5s, iPhone SE, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, and iPhone 6s Plus, all devices that are compatible with iOS 12.


As for iPads, The Verifier believes Apple will drop support for the iPad mini 2, iPad mini 3, iPad Air, iPad Air 2, and possibly the iPad mini 4. The sixth-generation iPod touch is listed as a device that will also be incompatible with iOS 13.

If this rumor is true, and we don't know that it is because The Verifier did not provide details on where the information is from or how it was obtained, it would see Apple dropping support for three generations of iPhones at one time, a move that seems somewhat unlikely.

Apple aims to provide software updates for its iOS devices for as long as possible. Both iOS 12 and iOS 11 offered support for the iPhone 5s and newer, the iPad mini 2 and newer, and the iPad Air and newer. At the time iOS 12 launched, some of those devices were five years old.

Dropping support for everything up to the iPhone 7 would leave iOS 13 compatible only with iOS devices from 2016 or later. Two of those devices, the iPad mini 4 and the sixth-generation iPod touch, are current-generation devices, though they may not be by the time iOS 13 launches as updates for both are in the works.

To cast further doubt on the site's claims, it lists the iPhone 6s as a device that won't support iOS 13 without naming the fifth-generation iPad. Both the fifth-generation iPad and the iPhone 6s use the A9 chip.

The Verifier claims that in addition to dropping support for iOS 13 on a wide swath of devices, Apple will also restrict some iOS 13 features to newer models to "make as many users upgrade to the latest models of iPhones." While it's true there are sometimes iOS features limited to newer devices because of hardware limitations, Apple has a long history of supporting older devices for years after launch.

The Verifier has previously provided semi-accurate info on Apple's plans. In 2017, for example, the site said Apple would bring Group FaceTime to iOS 11. We did get Group FaceTime, but not until iOS 12.1 in 2018.

Related Roundup: iOS 13

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