iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro Systems Must Pass Apple Diagnostics to Function After Certain Repairs

Due to advanced security features of the Apple T2 chip, iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro models must pass Apple diagnostics for certain repairs to be completed, according to an internal document from Apple obtained by MacRumors.


For the 2018 MacBook Pro, the requirement applies to repairs involving the display, logic board, Touch ID, and top case, which includes the keyboard, battery, trackpad, and speakers, according to the document. For the iMac Pro, the requirement only applies to logic board and flash storage repairs.

If any of these parts are repaired in an iMac Pro or 2018 MacBook Pro, and the Apple diagnostics are not run, this will result in an inoperative system and an incomplete repair, according to Apple's directive to service providers.

Apple's diagnostic suite is limited to internal use by Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers, as part of what is called the Apple Service Toolkit. As a result, independent repair shops without Apple certification may be unable to repair certain parts on the iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro.

Moreover, when the iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro are eventually classified as vintage products, meaning they are no longer eligible for hardware service from Apple, repairs through alternative channels might not be possible.

MacRumors has reached out to Apple for comment.

This requirement is a result of the T2 chip, which integrates several previously separate components, including the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller. It also features a Secure Enclave coprocessor for secure boot, encrypted storage, and authenticating Touch ID.

To initiate a Mac repair, visit the Get Support page on Apple.com.

Related Roundups: MacBook Pro, iMac Pro
Tag: T2 chip

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Apple Looking Into Limited Reports of T2-Related Kernel Panics on New MacBook Pro and iMac Pro

As highlighted by Digital Trends and VentureBeat, a small number of users have turned to the Apple Support Communities to report incidents of kernel panicking on the new MacBook Pro, possibly linked to Apple's T2 chip. The issue has also been highlighted by some of our own readers in the MacRumors forums.

Image Credit: iFixit

Many of the crash logs shared by users mention bridgeOS, which is the device firmware on the logic board that controls many functions, including the T2, fueling speculation that the chip is the root cause of the problem.

Similar reports of kernel panicking began last year with the iMac Pro, which is also equipped with the T2, so this does seem to be a potential issue with the chip, or the bridgeOS firmware that manages it, rather than an entirely new MacBook Pro controversy like the since-fixed excessive throttling.

Apple's custom T2 chip integrates several previously separate components, including the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller. It also features a Secure Enclave coprocessor for secure boot, encrypted storage, and authenticating Touch ID.

Apple support representatives appear to have provided a wide variety of solutions, ranging from disabling FileVault to turning off Power Nap, but none of the advice customers received suggests there is a permanent fix.

MacRumors reached out to Apple, which told us that this is not a widespread issue, nor one that it has received any direct reports about. Nevertheless, Apple said it has relevant teams looking into the matter and, unsurprisingly, is always aiming to improve the stability and reliability of its products.

In general, Apple recommends that customers update their MacBook Pros with the macOS High Sierra Supplemental Update released earlier this week, which contains reliability and stability improvements, including a bug fix that addresses excessive thermal throttling with the latest MacBook Pro models.

According to at least one user, the Supplemental Update has not resolved the kernel panicking. Hopefully, whatever is causing the issue can be identified and promptly fixed in a future software update.

Tag: T2 chip

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iMac Pro Features Apple’s Custom T2 Chip With Secure Boot Capabilities

Apple today confirmed the iMac Pro is equipped with its custom T2 chip for enhanced security and integration. The chip is second-generation silicon, building upon the T1 chip in the latest MacBook Pro with the Touch Bar that authenticates and secures Touch ID and Apple Pay respectively.


The T2 chip integrates several previously separate components, including the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller, for expanded capabilities on the iMac Pro.

For instance, Apple says the T2 chip's image signal processor works with the FaceTime HD camera to enable enhanced tone mapping, improved exposure control, and face detection-based auto exposure and auto white balance.

The T2 chip also has a Secure Enclave coprocessor that makes the iMac Pro even more secure with new encrypted storage and secure boot capabilities.
The data on your SSD is encrypted using dedicated AES hardware with no effect on the SSD's performance, while keeping the Intel Xeon processor free for your compute tasks. And secure boot ensures that the lowest levels of software aren't tampered with and that only operating system software trusted by Apple loads at startup.
Cabel Sasser, co-founder of software company Panic, recently shared a few screenshots of the Startup Security Utility powered by the T2 chip.
The settings reveal that users can enable a firmware password to prevent the iMac Pro from starting up from a different hard disk, CD, or DVD without the password. There are also three secure boot options and options to allow or disallow booting from external media devices such as USB and Thunderbolt drives.

"Full security" ensures that only the latest and most secure software can be run. Apple says this mode requires a network connection at the time of software installation. "Medium security" requires verifiable software to boot, but not the latest software, and "no security" lets the operating system boot freely.

iMac Pro became available to order today with 8- to 18-core configurations ranging in price from $4,999 to $13,199 in the United States. 14-core and 18-core models don't ship for an estimated 6-8 weeks.

Related Roundup: iMac Pro
Tag: T2 chip
Buyer's Guide: iMac Pro (Buy Now)

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