Today Marks the 13th Anniversary of When Steve Jobs Unveiled the Original iPhone

13 years ago today, then Apple CEO Steve Jobs took the stage at Macworld in San Francisco and surprised the world with the very first iPhone.

Jobs introduced the iPhone as if it were three separate products: an iPod with touch controls, a revolutionary mobile phone, and a breakthrough internet communications device. Today, the iPhone is still all of those things, but also so much more.


Apple has sold well over a billion iPhones since 2007, and as of last January, the company's active installed base had hit 1.4 billion devices. Though iPhone sales were down last year, the iPhone continues to be Apple's single most successful product.


Apple has steadily improved the iPhone over the years, refining the design over and over again, updating the camera, and adding new biometric features, and all of these changes have made the iPhone even more indispensable in our daily lives. Improvements over the years:

  • 2008: App Store and 3G network support

  • 2009: Personal Hotspot and video recording capabilities

  • 2010: New form factor and Retina display

  • 2011: Siri and iCloud

  • 2012: 4-inch display, Lightning connector, and LTE

  • 2013: Touch ID fingerprint sensor

  • 2014: 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch displays

  • 2015: 3D Touch, Live Photos, and 4K video recording

  • 2016: Waterproofing, dual-lens camera for iPhone 7 Plus, no headphone jack

  • 2017: No Home button, 5.8-inch OLED full screen display, wireless charging, fast charging, Face ID

  • 2018: 5.8 and 6.5-inch OLED screen sizes, three iPhone lineup

  • 2019: Night mode, triple-lens cameras

Rumors suggest the iPhone is going to see a major overhaul in 2020, with Apple set to debut 5G connectivity, a revamped iPhone 4-style frame design, 5.4, 6.1, and 6.7-inch iPhone sizes, and a time-of-flight laser-based camera system for better depth calculations and AR capabilities.


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Phil Schiller Talks About the Development of the Original iPad in New Interview

In a retrospective on the technology of the last decade, The New York Times has shared a new interview with marketing chief Phil Schiller, covering the debut of the iPad in early 2010.

Schiller says that the ‌iPad‌ was conceived when Apple began looking at a future computer device that could be sold under $500. Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO at the time, said that to reach that price point, things need to be removed "aggressively."


Apple cut the clamshell design and the keyboard, prompting the ‌iPad‌ team to work on multitouch technology, which would go on to debut first in the 2007 iPhone.
And so the team started working on multitouch technology. During that process, a human interface designer, Bas Ording, showed us this demo where he pretended to scroll and the whole screen moved up and down with realistic physics. It was one of those "holy crap" moments.
Apple set the ‌iPad‌ aside to focus on the ‌iPhone‌, but once the second-generation ‌iPhone‌ was launched, Apple returned to working on the tablet form factor. Schiller says that it was "easy to imagine" what needed to be taken from the ‌iPhone‌ to make the ‌iPad‌.
When we got back to the ‌iPad‌, it was really easy to imagine what to take from ‌iPhone‌ and what needed to be different to create the product it would be. It really helped.
The New York Times piece on the ‌iPad‌ also includes a tidbit from Walt Mossberg, former technology columnist for The Wall Street Journal, who worked closely with Jobs. Jobs invited Mossberg over to his home to show him the new ‌iPad‌ ahead of its launch.

Mossberg says he was impressed with the thinness of the ‌iPad‌, and Jobs was "careful" to demonstrate how it "wasn't just a big ‌iPhone‌." The most impressive part, though, was the price. Mossberg initially guessed $999 when Jobs asked what he thought the ‌iPad‌ might cost, half of the actual $499 price tag.
He gave me this wicked smile, and he said, "You're going to be really amazed if that's what you think. It's way lower than that."
Since the ‌iPad‌ first launched in 2010, Apple has released new versions on a yearly basis, and in 2019, the line has grown to encompass multiple pricing and design choices. There's the 11 and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models at the high-end, the middle tier 10.5-inch ‌iPad‌ Air, the tiny 7.9-inch iPad mini 5, and the low-cost 10.2-inch seventh-generation ‌iPad‌.

The New York Times also looks at several other technological advancements and changes that took place over the course of the last decade, including the development of Siri, Apple's 2016 fight with the FBI, and the 2011 death of Steve Jobs.


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Former Apple Employee Shares Incredible Story of Accidentally Stealing Steve Jobs’ MacBook From His Office

On a recent episode of The Eavesdrop podcast with Hector Rodriguez, shared on Reddit, Apple's former vice president of mobile advertising Andy Miller shared an incredible story about accidentally stealing Apple co-founder Steve Jobs' laptop, mouse, and mouse pad during a heated meeting in Jobs' office.


The story truly speaks for itself and begins at the 44 minute mark. Miller uses a few explicit words, so a fair warning that the video may be NSFW:


Miller joined Apple upon selling his mobile advertising company Quattro Wireless to the iPhone maker for $275 million in late 2009, reporting directly to Jobs. Miller remained at Apple until late 2011 and later served as an executive at motion-controller startup Leap Motion between 2012 and 2014.


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Tim Cook Remembers Steve Jobs on 8th Anniversary of His Death

Eight years ago today, Steve Jobs passed away from pancreatic cancer at the age of 56, one day after somewhat subdued Apple executives introduced the iPhone 4s at a media event on the company's Infinite Loop headquarters campus.


As he traditionally does, Apple CEO Tim Cook today marked the anniversary of Jobs' death with a tweet, sharing a Jobs quote and a photo of him at the iconic cube at Apple's Fifth Avenue retail store in New York City.


Apple continues to maintain its "Remembering Steve" page highlighting a few of the over one million submissions from people around the world who "shared their memories, thoughts, and feelings about Steve."


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Bob Iger: If Steve Jobs Were Alive, We Would Likely Have Combined Apple and Disney

Disney CEO and former Apple board member Bob Iger has a new book coming out later this month, and ahead of its release, Vanity Fair has shared some key excerpts about Steve Jobs, who was Iger's close friend.

When Iger first took over as CEO of Disney, the relationship between the two companies was strained due to Jobs' disagreements with Michael Eisner and the end of a deal that had seen Disney releasing Pixar films.

Steve Jobs and Bob Iger. Image credit: Paul Sakuma/A.P. Photo

Iger broke the ice with Jobs and rekindled a relationship by praising the iPod and discussing iTunes as a television platform.
I'd been thinking about the future of television, and believed it was only a matter of time before we would be accessing TV shows and movies on our computers. I didn't know how fast mobile technology was going to evolve (the iPhone was still two years away), so what I was imagining was an iTunes platform for television, "iTV," as I described it. Steve was silent for a while, and then finally said, "I'm going to come back to you on this. I'm working on something I want to show you."
Jobs went on to tell Iger about the video iPod, and asked Iger to put Disney TV shows on it, which Iger agreed to, leading to a solid friendship between the two and ultimately, a new Disney/Pixar deal.

According to Iger, in 2006 just ahead of when Disney was set to announce its acquisition of Pixar, Jobs told Iger that his cancer had returned and spread to his liver, giving Iger time to back out of the deal.
He told me the cancer was now in his liver and he talked about the odds of beating it. He was going to do whatever it took to be at his son Reed's high school graduation, he said. When he told me that was four years away, I felt devastated. It was impossible to be having these two conversations--about Steve facing his impending death and about the deal we were supposed to be closing in minutes--at the same time.
After the acquisition, Jobs underwent cancer treatment and served on Disney's board as Disney's largest shareholder. He weighed in on important Disney decisions like the acquisition of Marvel, and even vacationed with Iger on occasion. "Our connection was much more than a business relationship," wrote Iger.

Iger says that with each Disney success, there's always a moment where he wishes Jobs was there, and further, he believes that if Jobs were still alive, the two companies may have merged.
With every success the company has had since Steve's death, there's always a moment in the midst of my excitement when I think, I wish Steve could be here for this. It's impossible not to have the conversation with him in my head that I wish I could be having in real life. More than that, I believe that if Steve were still alive, we would have combined our companies, or at least discussed the possibility very seriously.
"The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company" is set to be released on September 23, 2019. It can be pre-ordered from Amazon for $19.60.

The full excerpt, which has a lot more on the history of the deal between Disney and Pixar, can be read over at Vanity Fair.


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Pixar Animations Studios Poster Signed by Steve Jobs to Be Auctioned Off for $25,000+

A rare Pixar Animation Studios poster featuring "Toy Story" characters Buzz Lightyear and Woody that was signed by former Apple CEO Steve Jobs is set to be auctioned off later this week.

Jobs is said to have signed the poster sometime after 1995 when "Toy Story" debuted. The movie was Pixar's first feature length film and it was overwhelmingly successful, securing Pixar as a major animated film studio.

Poster with extra magnification of the signature at the bottom

Steve Jobs was a majority shareholder in Pixar and he was credited as an executive producer in "Toy Story." Following Pixar's acquisition by Disney, Jobs also served as a member of Disney's board of directors as the company's largest individual shareholder.

The poster measures in at 24 inches by 36 inches and is signed by Jobs at the bottom near the Pixar logo.

The bidding on the poster will start at $25,000, and it comes with a letter of authenticity. The auction will kick off on August 29.


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iBook Turns 20: Watch Steve Jobs Unveil the World’s First Notebook With Wireless Internet

Upon returning to Apple in the late 1990s, Steve Jobs came up with a 2×2 product grid in an effort to simplify Apple's then-bloated lineup of computers. The grid was split into four quadrants, including a professional desktop, a consumer desktop, a professional portable, and a consumer portable.


Today marks the 20th anniversary of Jobs unveiling the fourth and final product in the grid, the iBook, at the 1999 Macworld Expo in New York City.

Targeted at consumers and students, the iBook easily stood out from other notebooks of its era with its unique clamshell-like design, consisting of hard, translucent plastic casing topped with soft, colorful rubber. Initial colors included Blueberry and Tangerine, with later models available in Graphite, Indigo, and Key Lime.


The original iBook, priced from $1,599, was equipped with a 12.1-inch display with an 800×600 resolution, a full-sized keyboard, and a trackpad. It also featured a retractable handle along its hinge, with Apple calling it an "iMac to go," although it was decently heavy at 6.7 pounds — even for its time.


Above all, the iBook was the first mass consumer product with support for wireless networking, with the 802.11b standard allowing for speeds up to 11 Mbps. Wireless support was not built in and required purchasing an optional $99 AirPort wireless card and a $299 AirPort base station.

Jobs demonstrated the iBook's wireless networking by walking across the stage with the notebook while loading a website, with the audience erupting in cheers. He then placed it through a hula hoop to prove there were no cables attached.


Memorably, a younger Phil Schiller even jumped from a height while holding the iBook as it wirelessly transferred accelerometer data. Referencing the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing, Schiller quipped "this is definitely one small step for man, and one giant leap for wireless networking."


Other tech specs included a 300MHz PowerPC G3 processor, 3.2GB hard drive, 32MB of RAM, ATI Rage Mobility graphics, 10/100 Ethernet, a CD-ROM drive, and up to six hours of battery life. To keep costs down, it had no FireWire port, video out, or microphone, and only one speaker and one USB port.

Apple went on to introduce a redesigned iBook with a more traditional notebook design in May 2001, followed by the white polycarbonate MacBook in 2006, but the original will always be an important part of Apple's history.

Last year, YouTubers iJustine and MKBHD teamed up to unbox an original, sealed iBook:


For more nostalgia:
We invite any readers who still own an iBook to share a photo in the comments section.


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Steve Jobs Criticized Tim Cook as ‘Not a Product Person,’ Says Biographer Walter Isaacson

"Steve Jobs" biographer Walter Isaacson was on Squawk Box this week, and in an interview he mentioned that he "softened" parts of the book when it came to certain Jobs quotes (via CNBC).


Particularly, Jobs was said to have criticized current Apple CEO Tim Cook for not being a "product person." According to Isaacson, "Steve says how Tim Cook can do everything, and then he looked at me and said, 'Tim's not a product person.'"

Isaacson said that he wanted to soften certain things that he thought were too harsh in his biography of Steve Jobs. The book first launched in October 2011, just 19 days after Jobs died from pancreatic cancer.
“Sometimes when Steve was in pain ... and he was angry, he would say more things that [Cook] was not a product person,” recalled Isaacson. “I felt I would put in the specific things that were relevant to the reader but not the complaints.”
Cook was also mentioned in a recent piece by The Wall Street Journal, which focused on Jony Ive, who reportedly became "dispirited" because of Cook's lack of interest in the product development process. Ive announced that he will leave Apple later this year and start his own design studio, with Apple as one of its primary clients.


Isaacson has been critical of Apple as a whole in the past, believing in 2014 that Amazon and Google had overtaken Apple to become the most innovative technology companies of the modern day. At the time, he specifically referenced virtual assistants as a space where Apple needed improvement.

Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs went on to be the basis for Aaron Sorkin's screenplay of the Danny Boyle-directed film "Steve Jobs." The film was well received by critics, earning four Golden Globe Award nominations and two Academy Award nominations.


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Today Marks Steve Jobs’ 64th Birthday as MacRumors turns 19

Former Apple CEO and co-founder Steve Jobs was born on February 24, 1955 and if he were still alive, today would mark his 64th birthday.

Jobs not only founded Apple alongside Steve Wozniak in 1976 and directed the development of some of the first personal computers, but he also brought Apple back from the brink of failure even after being ousted from the company he created.

In the 2000-2010s, Jobs was responsible for not only saving Apple, but then building it into one of the largest companies in the world. The introduction of the iPod in 2001 and iPhone in 2007 represented industry changing products that have sold hundreds of millions of units.

Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs passed away on October 5th, 2011 at the age of 56. Jobs had been suffering with complications related to pancreatic cancer in the years leading up to his death. Jobs has obviously affected the world with his contributions to Apple, and his death impacted us all. The article of his passing cites many reactions and photos from around the world.

Coincidentally, MacRumors shares the same birthday as Steve Jobs and was created on February 24, 2000. Today, the site turns 19 years sold, and we are grateful for our dedicated readers, community members, and volunteers.


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Macintosh Turns 35

Today marks the 35th anniversary of Apple's late co-founder Steve Jobs unveiling the original Macintosh.


Jobs pulled the Macintosh out of a bag during Apple's annual shareholders meeting on January 24, 1984 at the Flint Center in Cupertino, California, grinning from ear to ear as the crowd erupted in applause.


Macintosh's very first words:
Hello, I'm Macintosh. It sure is great to get out of that bag.

Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking, I'd like to share with you a maxim I thought of the first time I met an IBM mainframe: NEVER TRUST A COMPUTER YOU CAN'T LIFT!

Obviously, I can talk, but right now I'd like to sit back and listen. So, it is with considerable pride that I introduce a man who's been like a father to me… STEVE JOBS.
Two days earlier, Apple teased the Macintosh's introduction with its iconic "1984" ad during Super Bowl XVIII on CBS:


And here's a lesser-known video of Jobs introducing the Macintosh to the Boston Computer Society on January 30, 1984:




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