Samsung’s More Affordable Galaxy S10e Compared to iPhone XR

In the 2018 iPhone lineup, Apple introduced the iPhone XR, an iPhone that shares many of the same hardware advancements added in the XS and XS Max, but at a more affordable $749 price tag.

Samsung followed in Apple's footsteps with its own 2019 Galaxy smartphone lineup, introducing the Galaxy S10e alongside the S10 and S10+ with a smaller screen size and a cheaper $749 price point that's meant to compete with Apple's iPhone XR. In our latest YouTube video, we compare Samsung's affordable smartphone option to Apple's.

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Samsung's Galaxy S10e features a 5.8-inch 2280 x 1080 OLED display, while Apple's iPhone XR uses a 6.1-inch 1792 x 828 LCD display that Apple calls "Liquid Retina" because it's the company's best LCD to date. Samsung's OLED display is bright, crisp, vibrant, and a close match to the display used in its higher-end smartphones.

Apple's display doesn't look bad, but it can't quite match the quality of OLED. When it comes to cutouts, the iPhone XR uses the same notch as the iPhone XS and XS Max because it has the same Face ID facial recognition system, while the Galaxy S10e uses a unique hole-punch cutout for the front-facing camera that maximizes available screen real estate.


Samsung can't match Apple's facial recognition capabilities, so the Galaxy S10e features a fingerprint sensor built into the power button on the right side of the device. That's a deviation from other S10 devices that have an under-display ultrasonic fingerprint sensor.

Apple's iPhones typically beat Samsung's when it comes to processor performance, and it's no different with the XR and S10e. The XR is equipped with Apple's A12 bionic chip (the same chip that's in the XS and XS Max), while all of Samsung's smartphones, S10e included, use the Snapdragon 855. The Snapdragon 855 does not perform as well as the A12 on benchmarks, but these are modern smartphones that excel at everyday tasks.


The S10e is equipped with 6GB RAM, double the RAM in the iPhone XR, but Apple has traditionally made better use of lower quantities of RAM due to deep integration between hardware and software.

Samsung's S10e wins out over the XR when it comes to storage because the base model starts at 128GB of storage (vs. 64GB) and comes with a microSD card slot for expanding space available to you.


Because it has a smaller display, the S10e is lighter and more compact, which is better for one-handed use and closer to the iPhone XS. Both devices have multiple color options, with the XR coming in six shades and the S10e available in four colors with a pearlescent sheen.

Apple scaled back on the iPhone XR's rear camera to cut down on cost, and Samsung did the same thing. The iPhone XR uses a single-lens camera while the other iPhones have dual-lens setups, and the S10e has a dual-lens camera instead of a triple-lens camera. The S10e features both wide and ultra-wide lenses, while the XR only has a single wide-angle lens.


The XR uses software for Portrait Mode photos that have blurred backgrounds, which prevents the feature from working with pets, food, and anything but people, really. The S10e doesn't have that limitation, which, paired with the ultra-wide lens, gives the S10e an edge when it comes to photography. Apple's images are more color accurate and better at accurate exposures.

There are pluses and minuses with both Samsung and Apple's "budget" smartphones. Apple brings Face ID, its faster A-series chip tech, and tighter software/hardware integration (which, arguably, means a longer life and more frequent software updates), while Samsung's S10e has a dual-lens rear camera, an OLED display, and expandable storage.

Do you prefer the iPhone XR or the S10e? Which company did a better job making an affordable device that still has all of the modern tech one might want in a smartphone? Let us know in the comments.

Tag: Samsung

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Camera Comparison: iPhone XS Max vs. Samsung Galaxy S10+

Earlier this week, we asked our readers on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to look at some photos taken with the iPhone XS Max and the Samsung Galaxy S10+, Samsung's new flagship device, and tell us which photos they liked best.

There was a catch, though. We didn't tell them which smartphone took which photo, allowing us to aggregate some unbiased opinions on the quality of the images from each device. Today, we're revealing which photos came from which phone and sharing the results we gathered.

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All of the photos that we shared came straight from the camera and were not edited or otherwise manipulated. We'll go through each image and give a brief overview of what people thought before unveiling which camera was used for these images.


The first photo, of a cup, shows off the iPhone's Portrait Mode and Samsung's Live Focus mode, which is basically the same thing. Photo A has more natural colors because Photo B is too warm, but B wins when it comes to depth. Photo A cut off part of the cup, while Photo B did not, though Photo A offered better blurring of background images. Most people actually preferred Photo A, but we think Photo B is the winner because it didn't cut off any of the cup.


The second photo, featuring a person, was also captured with portrait mode. Compared to Photo B, Photo A seems a bit washed out, but A did a better job isolating the subject from the background. MacRumors readers preferred Photo A, and so do we.


The third photo, of a street sign, is a portrait mode photo taken in lower lighting conditions. It was gray and snowy outside, and Camera A took an image that was too cool. Photo A doesn't have any of the sign cut off, but the blueness of the image skewed this heavily in favor of Photo B.


In our fourth image set, of a skyline, Photo B is brighter, but a bit overexposed and washed out. Photo A is darker, but the dynamic range and contrast are more accurate, especially when looking at the clouds. Most people liked Photo B better, but we prefer A because it's not washed out.


Our last images, shared solely on Instagram due to Twitter limitations, demonstrate how well Camera A is able to handle shots of the sky. Photo B's highlights are blown out and Camera B didn't do a great job of capturing the sun. We didn't get a lot of feedback on this image, but we preferred Photo A.


If you guessed that all of the Photo A images came from the iPhone XS Max, you guessed right. Photo A is the iPhone and the Photo B images came from the Galaxy S10+.

Results we received from readers on preference were ultimately mixed, with some of the photos captured by the Galaxy S10+ coming out on top, and some photos captured by the iPhone winning out. That's no surprise, though, as both of these smartphones have great camera systems that can capture some fantastic images.

Apple's iPhone XS Max uses a dual-lens camera system with a 12-megapixel f/1.8 wide-angle lens paired with a 12-megapixel f/2.4 lens, while Samsung uses a more advanced triple-lens camera system (which is, incidentally, rumored to be coming to 2019 iPhones). The Galaxy S10+ has a 12-megapixel f/1.5 wide-angle lens, a 12-megapixel f/2.4 telephoto lens, and an additional 16-megapixel f/2.2 ultra wide-angle lens that can capture more of a scene at once, great for landscapes and group shots.


Both are also great at video and can record in 4K with optical image stabilization offered, though we thought the Galaxy S10+ outperformed the iPhone XS Max because its stabilization was just a bit better.

Overall, we preferred the images from the iPhone XS Max over the images from the Galaxy S10 because the iPhone offered more true-to-life colors, better dynamic range, and superior contrast, but the Galaxy S10+ still took fantastic shots.

Which photos did you prefer? iPhone XS Max or Galaxy S10+? Let us know in the comments.

Tag: Samsung

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Samsung to Preinstall Spotify on New Smartphones, Including Galaxy S10

Spotify today announced that its streaming music service will be preinstalled on the latest Samsung smartphones starting today, including the Galaxy S10, S10+, S10e, S10 5G, Galaxy Fold, and select Galaxy A models. New subscribers on those devices can receive a free six-month Spotify Premium trial in the United States.


The announcement reflects a major extension of a partnership that saw Spotify become Samsung's go-to music service provider in August 2018, a move intended to provide a seamless listening experience across Samsung devices.

Spotify being preinstalled on millions of Samsung smartphones brings it more in line with Apple Music, preinstalled on hundreds of millions of iOS devices. Last month, Spotify announced that it had 96 million paid subscribers as of the end of 2018, easily topping Apple Music's over 50 million subscribers.

We recently put together an Apple Music vs. Spotify guide that compares the two streaming music services.


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Samsung’s Galaxy Buds vs. Apple AirPods

Samsung's new Galaxy Buds, designed to compete with the AirPods, are launching this week. We got our hands on a set and thought we'd compare them with the AirPods to see just how Samsung's newest earbuds measure up to Apple's super popular product.

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Like the AirPods, the Galaxy Buds are wire free, using Bluetooth to connect two separate ear pieces to a smartphone or other device. Samsung opted for a different design than Apple, though, using a pillbox-style case and a squatter, rounder design for the earbuds themselves to set the Galaxy Buds apart from the AirPods.

Apple's AirPods, as you probably know, have a distinct design with a stem that comes out of the ears and a square flip case that's been likened to a container of dental floss.


Samsung's Galaxy Buds come in white, black, and yellow, while the AirPods are limited to white at the current time. The Galaxy Buds have a simple, clean design with a USB-C charging port at the back and Samsung branding at the top. AirPods have no Apple branding and a Lightning port at the bottom, along with a reset button on the back.

Both cases hold their respective earbuds in place magnetically and offer additional charge, and we found both to be equally portable. The AirPods case does have a slight edge, though, because it better holds the AirPods in place thanks to a stronger magnetic grip.


No headphones are going to fit in everyone's ears, and some people may have problems with the AirPods, while others might have issues with the Galaxy Buds. We had problems with fit when it came to the Galaxy Buds and it was difficult for us to get a good seal. We didn't have that problem with the AirPods, but fit is something that varies from person to person.

With the Galaxy Wear app on a Samsung device, you can see battery level and choose different equalizer presets, a feature not offered on the AirPods. With AirPods, you can see battery level natively when paired with an iOS device, but there's no accompanying app for making adjustments to sound. The Galaxy Buds also have an ambient sound setting to better let you hear your surroundings, but we didn't notice a huge difference.


Samsung's Galaxy Buds support customizable gestures just like the AirPods do. A tap plays or pauses music, a double tap plays the next track or answers/ends a call, a triple tap plays the previous track, and a tap and hold accesses the voice assistant, turns on ambient sound, or adjusts the volume. On AirPods, many of these same gestures are supported, but there's no tap gesture for changing volume.

AirPods pair to an Apple device using a W1 chip that enables quick pairing and device switching, and on Samsung phones, there's a similar feature for the Galaxy Buds. You can pop open the case to do a quick pair with a Galaxy smartphone, and there's an easy switch feature for swapping the earbuds over to any other Galaxy device.


Apple limits this feature to the iPhones, and similarly, the easy pairing feature on the Galaxy Buds is limited to Samsung devices. There's no quick pairing when using the Galaxy Buds with Android devices or an iPhone, so you'll need to use regular Bluetooth.

With the AirPods, there's a neat feature that pauses the music when you remove an earbud from your ear, which is not available with the Galaxy Buds, but Samsung's earbuds do offer several features not available with the AirPods.

For one, there's wireless charging, so you can charge the Galaxy Buds using any Qi wireless charging accessory. When using the Galaxy Buds with a new S10 device, there's a PowerShare feature that lets the S10 charge the Galaxy Buds, which is both handy and cool.


There's actually a rumor that the 2019 iPhones could get a similar feature, so we may very well be able to charge that rumored wireless AirPods charging case that's in the works with a 2019 iPhone when September rolls around.

Samsung's Galaxy Buds are basically the AirPods of the Samsung ecosystem. You're probably not going to want to pick these up if you're an iPhone owner because the AirPods offer so many more benefits, but if you have a Samsung device, there are a lot of great features you can take advantage of.

Tag: Samsung

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Kuo Increases Galaxy S10 Shipment Estimates Due to ‘Spec Differentiation From iPhone Models’

Respected Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who works for TF International Securities, today increased his forecast of Galaxy S10 shipments by 30 percent due to better than expected pre-order demand.

Kuo attributes the better-than-expected shipment momentum to several factors including spec differentiation from iPhone models.

Pre-order demand for the S10 series is better than expected. Worldwide pre-order demand for the S10 series grows by 30-40% YoY compared to that for the S9 series based on our survey. Therefore, we will increase shipment estimates of the S10 series in 2019 by 30% from 30-35mn to 40-45 units. S10+ and S10 account for 85% or more of total shipments.

We believe that the better-than-expected shipment momentum of S10 series is due to (1) the market's bearish view on high-end smartphone growth, (2) spec differentiation from iPhone models, including an ultrasonic fingerprint on display (FOD), rear triple-camera, and bilateral wireless charging, (3) much better-than-expected demand in China market, and (4) trade-in programs.
As Kuo points out, there are notable differences between Samsung's newest phone and Apple's current crop of iPhones. Samsung devices have a triple-lens camera setup with an ultra-wide lens, and an ultrasonic under-display fingerprint sensor.

Apple is rumored to be planning to introduce a similar camera setup in the 2019 iPhones, but because it uses Face ID facial recognition instead of a fingerprint sensor, Samsung's under-display fingerprint recognition technology will continue to set it apart from Apple.

Kuo believes the under-display fingerprint sensor and the triple camera are the "spotlights" of the S10 series.

Samsung's Galaxy S10 and S10+ are available for pre-order and are set to launch later this week.


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Samsung Developing Additional Folding Smartphones, May Offer Free Display Replacements for Alleged Crease Defect in Current Model

Samsung is working on two additional folding smartphone models to succeed the Galaxy Fold that's coming out this April, reports Bloomberg.

The new folding smartphones include a clamshell-like device that folds from top to bottom and another that folds outwards like Huawei's Mate X, another high-end folding smartphone coming this year.


Samsung's current Galaxy Fold, which will be priced at $1,980 when it launches, folds inwards rather than outwards, much like a book.

Samsung is experimenting with multiple folding designs to figure out what kind of fold works best with a smartphone/tablet hybrid.
"No one knows what the ideal design is yet," said Bryan Ma, vice president of devices research at IDC. "The time is ripe for experimentation. Many of these designs won't be successful, but industry players will learn valuable lessons along the way."
Samsung's vertically folding smartphone is set to be released in late 2019 or early 2020, with the company currently working on mockups to finalize the device's design. Right now, the smartphone has an extra screen on the outside, but it may be removed.

Samsung already has a prototype of a smartphone that folds outward like the Huawei Mate X and this device will come out last. It will be thinner than the other two because there is no extra screen.

According to Bloomberg, future foldable devices may incorporate the in-display ultrasonic fingerprint sensor that Samsung has built into the Galaxy S10. Reviews have been mixed on the sensor, with some reviewers suggesting it is sluggish and not always accurate.

Samsung is also hoping to make the Galaxy Fold more durable, eliminating a crease that appears on the current panel once it's been folded approximately 10,000 times. To combat this issue, Samsung is considering offering Galaxy Fold buyers free screen replacements after the smartphone launches. From Bloomberg:
The Galaxy Fold’s screen imperfection develops on a protective film covering the touch sensor bonded with the display underneath, the person said. That’s one reason why Samsung kept the phone inside a glass case at MWC in Barcelona last month, the person said. Samsung’s spokeswoman said the Galaxy Fold was displayed that way because it wanted more attention on the soon-to-be-launched Galaxy S10, not because there was a problem with the quality of the foldable device.
Right now, folding smartphone technology is imperfect and expensive, and it is not clear if foldable tablet/smartphone hybrids are a fad or something that will catch on and dictate the future of the smartphone industry.

There are no rumors suggesting that Apple has plans to release a foldable smartphone in the near future, but Apple is undoubtedly looking into foldable devices given that its major competitors are coming out with folding smartphones. In the past, Apple has patented some foldable display technology, and just recently, a rumor suggested Samsung has provided folding display samples to Apple.

Tag: Samsung

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Samsung Launches ‘Galaxy Buds’ AirPods Competitor

Alongside its new Galaxy S10 smartphone lineup and the Galaxy Fold, Samsung today announced a new wearable accessory, the Galaxy Buds.


The Galaxy Buds are Samsung's new wire-free earbuds, similar to the AirPods. Samsung focused on sound with the Galaxy Buds, partnering with AKG. An Enhanced Ambient Sound feature allows users to better hear their surroundings with the earbuds in the ears, and an Adaptive Dual Microphone provides clear voice in loud and quiet environments alike.


Samsung says the Galaxy Buds are 30 percent smaller and lighter than the previous-generation earbuds, making them Samsung's most compact wearable earbuds yet. The battery in the Galaxy Buds supports 5 hours of calls or six hours of music on one charge.


There's a wireless charging case that's used to charge the Galaxy Buds, and it can be charged using any Qi-based wireless charger. It can also be charged via a Galaxy S10 smartphone using the new wireless PowerShare feature.


The Galaxy Buds support Bixby integration for making calls, sending text messages, checking battery level, and more.


Samsung's Galaxy Buds come in three colors -- blue, green, and black -- and will be available for purchase on March 8. The Galaxy Buds will be priced at $129.99, but customers who pre-order a Galaxy S10 or S10+ can get a free pair of Galaxy Buds.

Along with the Galaxy Buds, Samsung today also unveiled two new wrist-worn devices, the Galaxy Watch Active and the Galaxy Fit. The Galaxy Watch Active is a round smart watch with a minimal design, featuring blood pressure monitoring, heart rate monitoring, stress checking and breathing exercises, fitness tracking, and Bixby integration.


The Galaxy Fit is a thin, lightweight wearable that's made for activity tracking. It features automatic workout tracking, heart rate monitoring, built-in alerts and messages, data like weather, calendar, and alarms from your smartphone, and more.


The Galaxy Watch Active will be available starting on March 8 for $200, while the Galaxy Fit is coming in the second quarter of 2019.

Tag: Samsung

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Samsung Debuts Galaxy S10 and S10+, Along With Premium S10 5G and Lower-Cost S10e

At an "Unpacked" event in San Francisco, California, Samsung today unveiled its 2019 device lineup, with a range of smartphones that will be competing with Apple's 2018 and 2019 devices.

Samsung's biggest announcement was the impressive Galaxy Fold, that can transform from a 4.6-inch smartphone to a 7.3-inch tablet for $1,980, but Samsung also had a whole line of other smartphones, including the Galaxy S10 and S10+.


Both devices use an "Infinity-O" display with smaller camera cutouts. The 6.1-inch Galaxy S10 has a super small hole punch cutout at the top of the display for the 10-megapixel camera, while the 6.4-inch Galaxy S10+, which has two cameras (8 and 10 megapixels) and an RGB depth sensor for adjusting depth of field, has a slightly larger oval-shaped cutout.

The display maxes out at 1,200 nits of brightness, which beats the iPhone, and it offers 60 million colors at 100 percent accuracy. It supports HDR10+ and cuts down on blue light by 44 percent for more comfortable viewing.


Underneath the display of the S10 and S10+ is an ultrasonic fingerprint scanner for biometric security. Samsung says that because it uses ultrasonic technology, it works well in bright light and in wet conditions. Samsung is using "vault-like security" for more protection.

The new smartphones come in different glass finishes, and there's also a premium ceramic option in black or white.

There's a triple-rear camera system in the S10 smartphones, with a 12-megapixel wide-angle lens, a 12-megapixel telephoto lens, and a 16-megapixel ultra-wide 120 degree lens for wider-angle landscape shots. It's able to record video in HDR10+ and features advanced stabilization.


The Galaxy S10 features a 3,400mAh battery, while the S10+ has a 4,100mAh battery. The S10 has 128 and 512GB storage options, as does the S10+, but the S10+ also has a premium tier 1TB storage option.

Samsung's new devices feature a Wireless PowerShare option that lets a Samsung smartphone wirelessly charge another device such as a second Samsung phone or Samsung's upcoming earbuds.


Pricing on the S10 starts at $900, while the S10+ starts at $1,000.

Along with the Galaxy S10 and S10+, Samsung is introducing two other smartphones that are lower and higher-end. The Galaxy S10e, a lower-cost device that sounds like an iPhone XR competitor, features a 5.8-inch display and a $750 price tag. It features just two rear cameras and a 3,100mAh battery.


On the high end, Samsung debuted the Galaxy S10 5G, a smartphone that features a 6.7-inch display, 5G connectivity, and all of the other bells and whistles of the S10 lineup. It features 256GB of storage and a 10-megapixel front-facing camera with a 3D depth sensor, and instead of three rear cameras, it has four: a telephoto, a wide-angle, an ultra wide-angle, and a 3D Depth camera.


Samsung will accept pre-orders for the Galaxy S10e, S10, and S10+ starting on February 21, with the smartphones set to launch on March 8. The higher-end Galaxy S10 5G will launch in the second quarter of 2019, with pricing not yet announced.

Tag: Samsung

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Samsung Unveils New $1,980 Galaxy Fold Smartphone

At its Unpacked 2019 event that took place in San Francisco today, Samsung officially unveiled its foldable smartphone, the Galaxy Fold. According to Samsung, the Galaxy Fold is a powerful smartphone and a revolutionary tablet all in one, a device that "defies category."

When folded up, the Galaxy Fold has a 4.6-inch display that's designed to fit in the palm of a hand, and when opened up, it has a 7.3-inch display that's tablet sized. It works with a hidden hinge with gears that are under the display. You can't see the hinge, providing a seamless look for the device.


Described as a luxury device, the Galaxy Fold comes in four colors: black, silver, green, and blue, and with some color options, the outside hinge shade can be customized.


Samsung worked with Google to create apps optimized for the dual-display fold, which supports a feature called App Continuity to keep the same apps open regardless of whether the Galaxy Fold is open or closed. With Google Maps, for example, in a folded mode you can see the map, but if you open it up, you can see a whole lot more.


Inside, there's a 7-nanometer processor, 12GB of RAM, and 512GB of storage, with Samsung describing it as one of the most powerful smartphones on the market. There's a 4,380mAh battery, which is actually two batteries on either side of the hinge.

It has six cameras -- three on the back, two on the inside, and one on the front so it can capture images no matter which way it's folded.

Galaxy Fold comes in two versions, one with LTE and one with 5G. Pricing starts at a whopping $1,980 and it will be available starting on April 26. It will ship with Samsung's upcoming AirPods competitors, the Galaxy Buds.

Tag: Samsung

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Leaked Renders Allegedly Reveal Samsung’s Foldable Phone Hours Ahead of Launch Event

Alleged leaked renders of Samsung's soon-to-be-unveiled foldable smartphone have emerged online ahead of the company's Unpacked product launch event on Wednesday.

Samsung has been teasing its upcoming "Galaxy Fold" phone for some time and demoed a prototype of the device back in November, but coming just hours before the company's launch event, these images via Slashleaks could be the real deal.


The Galaxy Fold features Samsung's new Infinity Flex display technology, and assuming no major changes since November, we can expect a device with a 7.3-inch display that can be folded in half, collapsing from a tablet size down to a 4.6-inch smartphone size.

Judging from the renders, the phone has a notch in the upper right corner of the display for the front-facing camera, and a dual-lens setup on the corresponding upper rear-side of the chassis.

Samsung is developing a new software platform for the device in partnership with Google, which is designed to support two UIs – one for when the device is open and one for when the device is closed – and will allow apps to orient into three possible layouts. A price tag as high as $1,800 was rumored for the phone in November, although Samsung may not have finalized costs at the time.


Following Samsung, Huawei and Xiaomi revealed that they too will launch folding smartphones, and there are plenty of signs Apple is looking into the possibility of a foldable iPhone. Apple has filed several patent applications related to folding phones that variously fold inward, outward, and both inward and outward.

Apple supplier LG Display is said to have created a dedicated task force to start developing a foldable OLED display for a future iPhone, while its sister company LG Innotek reportedly has a team developing a rigid flexible printed circuit board or (RFPCB) to go along with it.

Samsung's Galaxy Fold will officially debut at its February 20 event, where we can also expect the launch of the new Galaxy S10 smartphone lineup. Samsung's Unpacked event starts at 11.00 a.m. Pacific Time at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco, California, with a simultaneous launch event to be held in London at 7.00 p.m. GMT.


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