Apple Likely to Drop Adobe Flash Support in Next Version of Safari

As noted in our coverage yesterday of the latest Safari Technology Preview 99, Apple has removed all support for Adobe Flash. Safari Technology Preview is basically a beta of the next version of Safari proper, all but confirming that Apple is officially ditching support for Flash in the next version of its native Mac browser.


This means that when the next version of Safari is released, users will no longer be able to install or use Adobe Flash in the browser. The elimination of Flash support should not heavily impact users, given that most other popular browsers have already moved away from the format. Likewise, iPhone and iPad users won't be affected because Apple's mobile operating system has never supported Flash.

It was way back in July 2017 that Adobe announced plans to end-of-life its Flash browser plug-in. Adobe said it was ceasing development and distribution of the software at the end of 2020, and encouraged content creators to migrate flash content to HTML5, WebGL, and WebAssembly formats.

Adobe's Flash Player has always suffered from a seemingly never-ending stream of critical vulnerabilities that have exposed Mac and PC users to malware and other security risks. Vendors like Microsoft and Apple have had to work continually over the years to keep up with security fixes. Apple went so far as to stop selling Macs with Flash pre-installed, to ensure they weren't being shipped with outdated versions of the software and putting users at risk.

Some readers may fondly recall Steve Jobs' famous 2010 open letter offering his "Thoughts on Flash," in which the former Apple CEO railed against Adobe's software for its poor reliability, lack of openness, incompatibility with mobile sites and battery drain on mobile devices. Jobs also criticized Adobe for being "painfully slow" to adopt enhancements to Apple's platforms, and said that Apple refused to be at the mercy of a cross-platform development tool when it came innovation.

We don't know when the next version of Safari browser for Mac will be released to the public. In any case, it's safe to say that Flash will not be missed.


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Flaws in Apple’s Intelligent Tracking Prevention Safari Feature Let People Be Tracked

Google researchers discovered multiple security flaws in Apple's Safari web browser that let users' browsing habits be tracked despite Apple's Intelligent Tracking Prevention feature.

Google plans to publish details on the security flaws in the near future, and a preview of Google's discovery was seen by Financial Times, with the publication sharing information on the vulnerabilities this morning.

The security flaws were first found by Google in the summer of 2019, and were disclosed to Apple in August. There were five types of potential attacks that could allow third parties to learn "sensitive private information about the user's browsing habits."

Google researchers say that Safari left personal data exposed because the Intelligent Tracking Prevention List "implicitly stores information about the websites visited by the user." Malicious entities could use these flaws to create a "persistent fingerprint" that would follow a user around the web or see what individual users were searching for on search engine pages.

Intelligent Tracking Prevention, which Apple began implementing in 2017, is a privacy-focused feature meant to make it harder for sites to track users across the web, preventing browsing profiles and histories from being created.

Lukasz Olejnik, a security researcher who saw Google's paper, said that if exploited, the vulnerabilities "would allow unsanctioned and uncontrollable user tracking." Olejnik said that such privacy vulnerabilities are rare, and "issues in mechanisms designed to improve privacy are unexpected and highly counter-intuitive."

Apple appears to have addressed these Safari security flaws in a December update, based on a release update that thanked Google for its "responsible disclosure practice," though full security credit has not yet been provided by Apple so there's a chance that there's still some behind-the-scenes fixing to be done.

Tags: Google, Safari

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10 Long Press Tips to Reveal Hidden Functions in Safari on iPhone and iPad

On iPhone and iPad, a long press (also known as a press-and-hold) gesture will often initiate a different action in an app that isn't immediately obvious, such as revealing an icon's contextual menu. On recent iPhones, a long press will sometimes also offer haptic feedback in the form of a vibration, which Apple calls Haptic Touch.

Apple has made extensive use of the long press gesture and ‌Haptic Touch‌ in its apps, which means if you don't tend to long press screen elements, you could be unaware of some convenient shortcuts to everyday actions, or you could even be missing out on app functionality altogether.

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This is particularly true for Safari, Apple's native mobile browser, which has several handy features that can be accessed with a long press. In this article, we've put together 10 of our favorite long press tips for Safari on iPhones and iPads running iOS 13.

Note that the default minimum period that a finger must press on the screen for the long gesture to be recognized is half a second. If you're having trouble performing a long press, open the Settings app, go to Accessibility -> ‌Haptic Touch‌, and try selecting a Fast or Slow touch duration. There's also a handy interactive demo area for you to test each setting.

1. Bookmark Multiple Tabs in One Go


Make sure you have a few tabs open in Safari that you want to reference at a later time. Now, select one of those tabs, and in the main browsing window, long press the Bookmark icon (it looks like an open book).

safari tabs
A popup menu will appear on the screen that includes options to Add to Reading List and Add Bookmarks for X Tabs, X being the number of tabs open. Once you've tapped the latter option, you'll be asked to save the tabs in a new bookmarks folder. Alternately, you can choose an existing folder in which to save the tabs.

2. Bulk Copy Links in a Bookmarks Folder


Following on from the last tip, if you long press on a bookmarks folder in Safari, you'll see a Copy Contents option pop up in the contextual menu.

safari
Selecting this will copy a list of every website URL in that folder to your clipboard, allowing you to paste it elsewhere for easy sharing.

3. Fast Scroll Web Pages


A scroll bar appears on the right-hand side of the Safari window whenever you swipe to navigate a web page.

safari
If the content you're viewing is long, perform a long press on the scroll bar. The bar will swell slightly and you'll be able to drag it up and down and scroll at a much faster rate.

4. Close All Open Tabs


If the number of active tabs has gotten out of hand in your browser session, long press the Tabs icon in the bottom-right corner (top-right on ‌iPad‌) of the web page view to reveal the Close All Tabs option.

safari tabs
If you're in the vertical tabs view, you can reveal the same option by long pressing the Done button, which appears in the same location.

In ‌iOS 13‌, you‌ can actually get Safari to close tabs on your behalf, based on when you last viewed them. Launch the Settings app and select Safari -> Close Tabs, and you'll find options to make the browser automatically close tabs that have not been viewed After One Day, After One Week, or After One Month.

5. Re-open Recently Closed Tabs


If you've accidentally closed a browser tab in Safari and want to open it back up, open up the Tabs view and long press on the "+" icon to get a look at all of the tabs that you've recently closed.

safari
It's worth remembering that this long press option exists, because if someone gets ahold of your phone and checks your browser, even if you've closed out a tab, it's still going to be accessible in Safari, unless you were using a private browser window or have cleared your browsing history.

6. Open All Bookmarks in a Folder in New Tabs


This option appears in the same contextual menu described in tip 2. Long press a bookmarks folder and you'll see an option to Open in New Tabs.


Select the option, and Safari will open everything in that folder in separate tabs, ready for perusal.

7. Preview a Favorite Site or Hyperlink


If you want to take a peek at what a specific web page hyperlink has to offer before actually visiting the site, long press the link to get a preview of it. Note that you can also perform this action on the Favorites or Frequently Visited sites that appear in the start page of a new tab.

safari
If, say, you just want to copy a URL and would rather not have to wait for the preview to load every time you long press on one, simply tap Hide preview at the top-right corner of a link preview, and you won't get one again.

You can revert this functionality on the same long press screen at any time by selecting Tap to show preview.

8. Merge All Safari Windows


This one is exclusively for ‌iPad‌ users running iPadOS. If you have multiple browser windows open in the background, you can tidy things up by merging all of them, including their tabs, into the active browser window.

safari
Simply tap and hold the Tabs icon in the top-right corner of the screen and select Merge All Windows.

9. Download a Linked File


Now that now Safari has a Downloads Manager, you can download files directly from hyperlinks. Simply tap and hold a linked file, then select Download Linked File from the contextual menu. You can tap the Downloads Manager icon in the top-right corner of the address bar to check on its progress.

safari
This option works for web pages, too. If you long press the headline of this article, for example, you can download an HTML version of it.

10. Access the Tab Control Panel


Another one that's just for Safari on ‌iPad‌. Next time you have multiple tabs open, tap and hold one of those tabs to access the new tab control panel.

safari
From this panel, you'll see options to copy the URL of the tab to the clipboard, close all other tabs, and two entirely new options allowing you to Arrange Tabs By Title or Arrange Tabs By Website. Select one of the latter two options, and your open tabs will be arranged alphabetically.


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Pwn2Own Hacking Competition Returns in March, Up to $130,000 in Prizes Available for Safari Vulnerabilities

Trend Micro today announced that its annual Pwn2Own hacking competition will be held March 18-20 in Vancouver, Canada.


Pwn2Own, part of the CanSecWest conference, tasks security researchers with uncovering vulnerabilities in operating systems, web browsers, and more, ranging from macOS and Windows to Safari and Chrome.

This year, two prizes will be available for Safari on macOS, including $60,000 for a sandbox escape and $70,000 for a kernel-level escalation of privileges.

There is also up to a $500,000 prize for Tesla Model 3 vulnerabilities.

Last year at Pwn2Own, at least two zero-day security vulnerabilities were discovered in Safari on macOS. All exploits achieved during the contest are reported to the necessary companies like Apple so that they can be patched.


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DuckDuckGo’s Safari Privacy Browser Extension Now Available for macOS Catalina

Privacy oriented search engine DuckDuckGo today released an updated version of its browser extension for desktop Safari users running macOS Catalina.


The launch comes after DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials had to be removed from the Safari extensions gallery following major changes introduced in Safari 12 that made the extension incompatible. From the DuckDuckGo website:
As you may be aware, major structural changes in Safari 12 meant that we had to remove DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials from the Safari extensions gallery. With Safari 13, new functionality was thankfully added that enabled us to put it back. Consequently, you'll need Safari 13+ on macOS 10.15 (Catalina) or newer to install the updated version.
DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials blocks hidden third-party trackers on websites and features a Privacy Dashboard, which generates a Privacy Grade rating (A-F) information card whenever a user visits a site. The rating aims to let them see at a glance how protected they are, while providing additional options to dig deeper into the details of blocked tracking attempts.

While the extension doesn't include private search, DuckDuckGo Search is built into Safari as a default search option, and they work together to help users search and browse privately.

DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials is only available for desktop browsers, however DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser is available for iOS and uses the same privacy protection technology.


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Apple Clarifies Tencent’s Role in Fraudulent Website Warnings, Says No URL Data is Shared and Checks are Limited to Mainland China

Following user concern over Apple using Chinese company Tencent as one of its Safe Browsing partners for Safari, Apple has issued a statement assuring customers that website URLs are not shared with its safe browsing partners.

For those unfamiliar with the feature, Safari sends data to Google Safe Browsing to cross reference URLs against a blacklist to protect users against scams and malicious sites. It recently came to light that Apple is also using Tencent for this purpose, and there was concern that data from users outside of China was being sent to Tencent.


According to Apple's statement, that is not the case, and Tencent is used for devices that have their region code set to mainland China. Users in the United States, the UK, and other countries do not have their website browsing checked against Tencent's safe list.
Apple protects user privacy and safeguards your data with Safari Fraudulent Website Warning, a security feature that flags websites known to be malicious in nature. When the feature is enabled, Safari checks the website URL against lists of known websites and displays a warning if the URL the user is visiting is suspected of fraudulent conduct like phishing.

To accomplish this task, Safari receives a list of websites known to be malicious from Google, and for devices with their region code set to mainland China, it receives a list from Tencent. The actual URL of a website you visit is never shared with a safe browsing provider and the feature can be turned off.
Safari occasionally receives a list of hash prefixes of URLs known to be malicious from Google or Tencent, choosing between them based on the device's region setting (Tencent for China, Google for other countries). Hash prefixes are the same across multiple URLs, which means the hash prefix received by Safari does not uniquely identify a URL.

Prior to loading a website, when the fraudulent website warning feature is toggled on, Safari checks whether a website URL has a hash prefix to match the hash prefixes of malicious sites. If a match is found, Safari sends the hash prefix to its safe browsing provider and then asks for the full list of URLs that have a hash prefix that matches the suspicious one.

When Safari receives the list of URLs, it checks the original suspicious URL against the list, and if there is a match, Safari shows the warning pop up suggesting users stay away from the site. The check happens on the user's device, and the URL itself is not shared with the safe browsing provider, but because Safari communicates directly with the safe browsing provider, the providers do receive device IP addresses.

Information about Apple's safe browsing partners can be found in the About Safari and Privacy screen, available in the Privacy and Security section of the Safari portion of the Settings app. Fraudulent website protection is enabled by default, and those still concerned about the safety check feature can turn it off by deselecting the "Fraudulent Website Warning" toggle.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Tags: China, Safari

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Apple Sending User Data to Chinese Company for Fraudulent Website Warnings in Safari

Apple's Fraudulent Website Warning feature in Safari for iOS and Mac has come under scrutiny for using Chinese internet giant Tencent as one of its Safe Browsing providers.

The Safari feature has long sent data to Google Safe Browsing to cross-reference URLs against a blacklist and protect users against phishing scams and sites that attempt to push malware. However, it's unclear when Apple started sending user data to Tencent as well.

Apple notes in iOS that it sends some user IP addresses to Tencent, but most users are probably unaware of the fact. The mention can be found in the "About Safari & Privacy" screen, which is linked via small text under the Privacy & Security section in Settings -> Safari. The Fraudulent Website Warning feature is also enabled by default, so users aren't likely to know that their IP address may be logged unless they opt to view the information screen.

Apple's reference to Tencent has been found on devices running iOS 13, but some tweets suggest versions as early as iOS 12.2 also included the Chinese company as a safe browsing provider.

At this point, it's difficult to know for sure whether Apple users residing outside of China are having their data sent to Tencent, but the company appears to be mentioned on iPhones and iPads registered in the U.S. and the U.K., and possibly in other countries, too.


The privacy implications of shifting Safe Browsing to Tencent's servers are unknown, because Apple hasn't said much about it. However, according to Johns Hopkins University professor Matthew Green, a malicious provider could theoretically use Google's Safe Browsing approach to de-anonymize a user by linking their site requests.

Apple's relationship with the Chinese government has come in for increasing criticism lately, and that could make customers uneasy about Apple's links to Tencent, which is known to work closely with the Chinese Communist Party.

As such, Green believes users "deserve to be informed about this kind of change and to make choices about it. At very least, users should learn about these changes before Apple pushes the feature into production, and thus asks millions of their customers to trust them."

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Tags: China, Safari

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U.K. Court Reinstates Lawsuit Accusing Google of Bypassing Safari’s Privacy Settings to Track iPhone Users

An appeals court in London has reinstated a lawsuit filed against Google that accuses the company of unlawfully gathering personal information by circumventing the iPhone's default privacy settings, according to Bloomberg.


The collective action, equivalent to a class action lawsuit in the United States, alleged that Google illegally tracked and gathered the personal data of over four million iPhone users in the U.K. between 2011 and 2012. The case was first brought in November 2017 and had been dismissed in October 2018.

"This case, quite properly if the allegations are proved, seeks to call Google to account for its allegedly wholesale and deliberate misuse of personal data without consent, undertaken with a view to a commercial profit," wrote Judge Geoffrey Vos in a ruling today, per the report.

A similar lawsuit was filed in the United States in 2012, when Google was discovered to be circumventing privacy protections in Safari on iOS in order to track users through ads on numerous popular websites.

Specifically, Google took advantage of a Safari loophole that made the browser think that the user was interacting with a given ad, thus allowing a tracking cookie to be installed. With that cookie installed, it became easy for Google to add additional cookies and to track users across the web.

At the time, Safari blocked several types of tracking, but made an exception for websites where a person interacted in some way — by filling out a form, for example. Google added code to some of its ads that made Safari think that a person was submitting an invisible form to Google, thus creating a temporary cookie.

Google stopped this practice after it was reported by The Wall Street Journal, and refuted many details of the report, while Apple closed the loophole in a Safari update shortly after. Google also paid a then-record $22.5 million fine to the Federal Trade Commission over its practices back in 2012.

"Protecting the privacy and security of our users has always been our No. 1 priority," a Google spokeswoman told Bloomberg. "This case relates to events that took place nearly a decade ago and that we addressed at the time."


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Apple WebKit Team Publishes Website Tracking Prevention Policy

Apple's WebKit team has published a "WebKit Tracking Prevention Policy" that details a range of anti-tracking measures it has developed and the types of tracking practices it believes are harmful to users.


Inspired by Mozilla's anti-tracking policy, the document posted to the WebKit blog provides an insight into the anti-tracking features built into Apple's Safari browser that the team hopes to see in all browsers one day.
This document describes the web tracking practices that WebKit believes, as a matter of policy, should be prevented by default by web browsers. These practices are harmful to users because they infringe on a user's privacy without giving users the ability to identify, understand, consent to, or control them.
Apple introduced Intelligent Tracking Prevention in iOS 11 and in Safari 11 in macOS High Sierra 10.13 and has been working to develop ITP ever since. For example, in February Apple released iOS 12.2 and Safari 12.1 for macOS, both of which included ITP 2.1 featuring enhancements that block cross-site tracking.

The new WebKit policy highlights Apple's continuing efforts to target all forms of cross-site tracking behavior, even if it's in plain view.
WebKit will do its best to prevent all covert tracking, and all cross-site tracking (even when it’s not covert). These goals apply to all types of tracking listed above, as well as tracking techniques currently unknown to us.

If a particular tracking technique cannot be completely prevented without undue user harm, WebKit will limit the capability of using the technique. For example, limiting the time window for tracking or reducing the available bits of entropy — unique data points that may be used to identify a user or a user’s behavior.
In addition to cross-site tracking, the document outlines several other tracking practices it deems harmful to users, and says WebKit will treat circumvention of its anti-tracking measures "with the same seriousness as exploitation of security vulnerabilities."
If a party attempts to circumvent our tracking prevention methods, we may add additional restrictions without prior notice. These restrictions may apply universally; to algorithmically classified targets; or to specific parties engaging in circumvention.
For more on tracking definitions, the unintended impact of anti-tracking measures, and exceptions to the rules, check out the full WebKit Tracking Prevention Policy on the WebKit blog.


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Safari: What’s New in iOS 13

Safari is one of the most important apps on the iPhone and iPad, allowing iOS users to access the web on their devices. Safari is one of the apps that routinely gets updated when new versions of iOS are released, and iOS 13 is no exception.

Safari in iOS 13 offers a whole range of useful updates, from an updated start page to a new download manager. Below, we walk through all of the new and important features in Safari in iOS 13.

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Revamped Start Page


Safari in iOS 13 has a revamped start page (the page that's available when you open a new Safari window or tab) that now incorporates Siri Suggestions and other features.

safari start page in iOS 13
The start page includes access to your favorite websites as usual, but Siri Suggestions will also surface relevant websites in your browsing history along with frequently visited sites, links sent to you in the Messages app, and more.

The new start page is designed to let you get to what most interests you quickly, and it makes sure you don't forget to check out websites recommended to you by friends and family.

Website View Menu


In the Smart Search field where you can search or type in URLs, there's a new icon on the left denoted by two As.

safari view menu in iOS 13
Tapping on this icon opens up the new Website View menu, where you can access the following controls:

  • Text Size Options - Adjust the size of the text on the website you're on.


  • Enable Reader View - Enable Reader View on the website you're on, which gets rid of ads and formatting for a clean book-style reading interface.


  • Hide Toolbar - Eliminates the Toolbar so you can see the webpage you're on full screen.


  • Request Desktop Website - Loads the desktop version of a website instead of the mobile version. This feature is for the iPhone, as the iPad now automatically loads desktop versions of websites instead of mobile versions. This turns into "Request Mobile Website" if the desktop site is already loaded.


  • Website Settings - Provides access to individual settings for each website. You can set the site you're on to load in Reader view automatically or to always load as a desktop website. You can also enable or disable content blockers on a per-site basis, and toggle access to the camera, microphone, and you're location. You can view sites where you've customized the settings in the Safari section of the Settings app under "Website Settings."

Website Settings


In the Safari section of the Settings app, there are new per-site controls that let you adjust everything from page zoom to privacy settings for all of the websites you visit (with settings for individual sites customizable using the View Menu mentioned above).

safari website settings in iOS 13
Custom settings you've set will also be listed here along with the toggles to control all websites by default. Available settings:

  • Page Zoom - Sets the page zoom level for all websites from 50 percent to 300 percent. The default is 100 percent.


  • Request Desktop Website - Lets you enable Request Desktop Site for all websites by default.


  • Enable Reader View - Lets you enable Reader View for all websites by default. Sites with a Reader mode will always load in that view.


  • Enable/Disable Content Blockers - Lets you toggle on or toggle off content blockers for all websites.


  • Camera Access - Controls camera access. Available settings are Ask, Deny, and Allow.


  • Location Access - Controls location access. Available settings are Ask, Deny, and Allow.


  • Microphone Access - Controls microphone access. Available settings are Ask, Deny, and Allow.

If you've enabled some of these settings on a per-site basis using the View Menu, such as turning on Request Desktop Site for MacRumors.com, you can disable the presets or delete them in the Website Settings section using the Edit menu for each category.

There's also an option to clear all settings when using this view.

Photo Upload Resizing


When uploading a photo to a website in Safari, you can now choose what size image to upload. Options include Actual Size, Large, Medium, and Small, with each option providing the file size at the bottom of the display once it's selected.

safari photo uploads

Saving Open Tabs as Bookmarks


Safari in iOS 13 includes a new feature that lets you bookmark all of your open tabs. To get to it, long press on the bookmark icon at the bottom of the Safari window, and then choose "Add Bookmarks for [x] Tabs."


Selecting this will provide you with an interface where you can choose a new folder name and location for the bookmarks to be saved.


You can open up all the bookmarks that you've saved into new tabs (or bookmarks from any other folder) by opening up the Bookmarks interface, long pressing on the folder, and selecting the new "Open in New Tabs" option. There's also an option to copy the contents, which has also been added in iOS 13.

Accessing Open Tabs From Search


When you start typing the address of a website that's already open in another tab, Safari will direct you to the open tab in iOS 13 rather than opening up a new tab. This makes sure you don't open unnecessary tabs.

Automatically Close Safari Tabs


If you want to set your Safari tabs to automatically close after a set period of time, there's a new option to do so in the Safari section of the Settings app.

safari setting to automatically close tabs in iOS 13
Open up Settings, choose Safari, scroll down to where it says "Close Tabs" and select the option that you want. The default setting is manual, which means tabs won't close unless you close them yourself, but you can also set tabs to clear automatically after one day, one week, and one month.

Redesigned Share Sheet


The Share Sheet in iOS 13 has been redesigned, making options like Copy, Add to Reading List, Add Bookmark, and more easier to get to with a new list-style view.

Multiple contact suggestions are also included in the Share Sheet now, including people you've recently spoken to in Messages and AirDrop devices that are nearby.


There's a new feature for sharing an entire web page as a link, a PDF, or in Reader view from the Share Sheet, and through the "Options" interface, you can choose whether to send content as a PDF or a Web Archive. By default, though, iOS 13 will pick "the most suitable format" for each app or action.

Sign In With Apple


Though not enabled in the beta right now, Apple is introducing a new Sign In with Apple feature that's a privacy-focused alternative to existing sign-in options from companies like Twitter, Google, and Facebook.

Sign In with Apple is designed to let you sign in with various apps and websites using your existing Apple ID as an authentication method. Unlike sign in options from Google, Twitter, and Facebook, Apple's new option doesn't track or profile you when using Sign In with Apple.


With Sign In with Apple, there's no need to create a login name or email address when signing up for a new website account. Sign In with Apple is authenticated via Face ID or Touch ID, and your information is further protected with two-factor authentication.

If you don't want to share your email address with an app or service that uses Sign In with Apple, Apple has created a "Hide My Email" feature to let you create unique single-use email addresses that forward to your real email address while keeping it inaccessible to third-party apps and services.


Sign In with Apple is designed to work in Safari on iOS, Safari on Mac, in apps, and on other platforms.

Weak Password Warnings


When signing up for a new website account, if you attempt to use a weak password, Safari will give you a warning and suggest a stronger password.

Stronger Encryption


In iOS 13, Safari history and open tabs that have been synced to iCloud are protected with end-to-end encryption, which means that no one but you can access your browsing history.

Enhanced Anti-Fingerprinting Protections


Apple has bolstered anti-fingerprinting protections in Safari in iOS 13, adding new protections related to browser fonts. Anti-fingerprinting techniques prevent companies from tracking your web browsing activities from website to website.

Download Manager


Safari features a new Download Manager that matches the Download Manager in Safari for desktop. When you choose to download a file, such as an image, a little download icon is displayed in the top right corner of the display.


Tapping on the icon will let you see a list of files that you've downloaded, and tapping on the magnifying glass next to any file opens its enclosing folder.

By default, your downloaded Safari files are saved in a "Downloads" section of the Files app, but you can customize the file storage location by opening up the Settings app, selecting the Safari section, and tapping on the "Downloads" section.


You can choose to save files in iCloud Drive, on your iPhone, or in another location such as a different iCloud folder, Dropbox, or another cloud service.

Items in your Safari Download Manager can be set to be deleted after one day, upon successful download, or manually. One day is the default.

Safari on iPadOS


While all of the above features are available on both the iPhone and the iPad, there are some additional changes and updates that were added into iPadOS, the version of iOS 13 that's designed to run on the iPad.

Desktop Websites


All websites on the iPad now display in desktop mode rather than mobile view, better mimicking the viewing experience that you get on a Mac.


Keyboard Shortcuts


Safari on iPadOS introduces 30 additional shortcuts that can be used when browsing, similar to the shortcuts that can be used for Safari on a Mac.

The new keyboard shortcuts work with the Smart Keyboard from Apple or any third-party Bluetooth keyboard.

  • Use default font size in Reader (Command + 0)

  • Open link in background (Command + tap)

  • Toggle downloads (Command + Alt/Option)

  • Open link in new window (Command + Alt + tap)

  • Use selection for Find (Command + E)

  • Email this page (Command + I)

  • Open link in new tab (Command + Shift + tap)

  • Decrease Reader text size (Command + -)

  • Zoom in (Command + +)

  • Zoom out (Command + -)

  • Save webpage (Command + S)

  • Change focused element (Alt/Option + tab)

  • Focus Smart Search field (Command + Alt/Option + F)

  • Dismiss web view in app (Command + W)

  • Increase Reader text size (Command + +)

  • Download linked file (Alt + tap)

  • Add link to Reading List (Shift + tap)

  • Close other tabs (Command + Alt/Option + W)

  • Scroll around screen (arrow keys)

  • Paste without formatting (Command + Shift + Alt/Option + V)

  • New Private tab (Command + Shift + N)

  • Actual size (Command + 0)

  • Open search result (Command + Return)

  • Toggle bookmarks (Command + Alt/Option + 1)

Full Toolbar in Split View


When using Safari in Split View, the full toolbar is now displayed. In iOS 12, the search bar was visible, but none of the additional tools for doing things like accessing bookmarks, getting to the Share Sheet, and more.


Creating New Windows


iOS 13 supports multiple windows from the same app in Split View, and to create two Safari windows, you can drag a link from one Safari window into to another to open Split View or Slide Over.

Dragging a link into a multitasking window with another app already open will open Safari as the secondary window. So, for example, you can open up Messages, receive a link, and drag it to create a Split View interface that has Safari (with the webpage in the link) and Messages open.

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This article, "Safari: What's New in iOS 13" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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