Apple Lowers Price of MacBook Pro’s High-End SSD Upgrade Options

Alongside a refresh of the iMac and new Radeon Pro Vega graphics options for the iMac Pro, Apple today quietly lowered the price of some of the storage upgrade options for the MacBook Pro.

2TB and 4TB SSD upgrade options for 13 and 15-inch machines are now more affordable, with Apple dropping prices as much as $400.


Upgrading to 2TB of storage on the 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro models is now $200 cheaper, while upgrading to 4TB on the 15-inch MacBook Pro is $400 cheaper.

SSD upgrade pricing for the MacBook Pro models is below:

Entry level 15-inch MacBook Pro:

  • 512GB SSD - +$200 (No change)

  • 1TB SSD - +$600 (No change)

  • 2TB SSD - +$1,200 ($200 off)

  • 4TB SSD - +$3,000 ($400 off)


Higher-end 15-inch MacBook Pro:

  • 1TB SSD - +$400 (No change)

  • 2TB SSD - +$1,000 ($200 off)

  • 4TB SSD - +$2,800 ($400 off)


Entry level 13-inch MacBook Pro:

  • 512GB SSD - +$200 (No change)

  • 1TB SSD - +$600 (No change)

  • 2TB SSD - +$1,200 ($200 off)


Higher-end 13-inch MacBook Pro:

  • 1TB SSD - +$400 (No change)

  • 2TB SSD - +$1,000 ($200 off)


It's not unusual for Apple to adjust storage prices for its products, especially at the higher end, as prices fluctuate and come down over time after a machine has been released. Apple has changed storage prices for various Macs multiple times over the years.

Apple's MacBook Pro models are not designed to have the SSD upgraded after purchase as the storage is soldered to the motherboard, so the price drop is nice to see for those who want to purchase more storage to futureproof their machines.

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This article, "Apple Lowers Price of MacBook Pro's High-End SSD Upgrade Options" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Adds 15-Inch MacBook Pro Models With Radeon Pro Vega Graphics to Refurbished Store

Apple's online refurbished store is now offering discounted versions of the 15-inch MacBook Pro models with Radeon Pro Vega graphics, allowing the higher-end machines to be purchased at a discount.

Apple announced plans to add AMD's Radeon Pro Vega graphics to its MacBook Pro lineup in October when the new MacBook Air models were announced. MacBook Pro models with the new options were able to be purchased in November.


Only the higher-end 15-inch MacBook Pro can be upgraded with the Radeon Pro Vega 16 (+$250) or Radeon Pro Vega 20 (+$350), so purchased new, machines with the new graphics options are priced starting at $3,049.

Apple has a wide selection of MacBook Pro models with Radeon Pro Vega 16 and 20 graphics available. One of the most affordable options, which is a Core i9 model with the Radeon Pro Vega 16, 16GB RAM, and a 512GB SSD, is priced at $2,849, a $500 discount.

A base level Core i7 model with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, and the Radeon Pro Vega 20 is even cheaper at $2,679, a $470 discount.

There are a number of MacBook Pro configurations available with different RAM, SSD, and processor upgrades, all of which are equipped with the new graphics cards. With the wide range of configurations available, people looking for a discounted MacBook Pro with the Radeon Pro Vega should be able to find what they're seeking with today's update.

Apple even has a maxed out MacBook Pro with Core i9 processor, 32GB RAM, Radeon Pro Vega 20, and 4TB SSD for $5,989, a discount of $1,060.

Apple's refurbished stock does fluctuate, however, so available stock of refurbished MacBook Pro models could sell out quickly. Apple refreshes the refurbished store on a regular basis, and it can be handy to keep an eye on a tool like Refurb Tracker to find specific configurations.

All of the available MacBook Pro models are listed on Apple's refurbished site.

Purchasing a refurbished MacBook Pro from Apple is a good way to get a like-new device at a lower price point. All of Apple's refurbished products are tested, certified, cleaned, and guaranteed with a one-year warranty that can be extended with AppleCare+.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Caution)

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Apple May Have Quietly Addressed ‘Flexgate’ in 2018 MacBook Pros

iFixit reports that Apple may have already taken steps to reduce the likelihood of 2018 MacBook Pro users experiencing display lighting issues dubbed Flexgate. Affected machines could see uneven lighting that looks like a "stage light" effect with the display potentially failing completely over time.


iFixit was tipped off by MacRumors forum user Olivia88 posting in our Flexgate megathread that their 2018 13" MacBook Pro appeared to have a longer cable than previous models. iFixit confirmed this finding:
Since we were just wrapping up writing the repair manual for the 2018 model anyway, we checked inside our 2018 15” MacBook Pro again to measure its cable against its 2016 predecessor—and found the 2018 cable was, in fact, a full 2mm longer. Since this change appears in both our 15” model and Olivia88’s 13” model, it’s plausible this change is present in multiple, if not all, 2018 MacBook Pros.
iFixit speculates that this could prevent some of the wear and tear that had previously caused the failure though they weren't able to say for certain.

Apple has yet to publicly acknowledge the issue, and our Flexgate guide covers what your options are if you are affected by this issue.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Caution)

This article, "Apple May Have Quietly Addressed 'Flexgate' in 2018 MacBook Pros" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Said to Release 16-Inch to 16.5-Inch MacBook Pro With All-New Design in 2019

Apple will release a new MacBook Pro with a 16-inch to 16.5-inch display and an all-new design in 2019, according to Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.


Tonight, analyst Ming-Chi Kuo released a research note looking at Apple's releases in 2019. MacRumors has obtained a copy of the report and perhaps the most exciting prediction for Mac users is the revelation that Apple is working on a 16"-16.5" MacBook Pro. Unfortunately the report provides few details beyond that it is an "all-new" design, suggesting Apple is revamping their current MacBook Pro design.

A 16"-16.5" screen would be the largest screen Apple has provided on a MacBook Pro since the discontinuation of the 17" MacBook Pro in 2012. Close followers of Apple's MacBook Pro refresh cycle have been expecting Apple to continue with the current design until at least 2020. The MacBook Pro last saw a redesign only two and half years ago.

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Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Caution)

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Some Users Report Adobe Premiere Pro Issue Causing Blown Out MacBook Pro Speakers

There appears to be an issue with recent versions of Adobe Premiere Pro that can result in blown out MacBook Pro speakers.


MacRumors reader Alvin Shen alerted us to multiple users on the Adobe support forums who report that Premiere Pro suddenly caused loud, distorted audio to play through their MacBook Pro speakers, resulting in permanent damage. In many cases, the issue arose when users were editing the audio settings of video clips.

"I was using the Adobe Premiere 2019 Audio suite for background sound and while tweaking the settings it made a loud distorted noise that hurt even my ears," wrote one user. "After that my speakers are unusable."

The discussion topic was posted in November, and there are replies from affected users through January, suggesting that the apparent bug is present in both versions 12.0.1 and 12.0.2 of Premiere Pro CC for Mac. It's unclear when the issue began, how many users are affected, or what the exact cause is.

It appears Adobe advised at least one customer to try disabling the MacBook Pro's microphone in Premiere Pro by selecting No Input under Preferences > Audio Hardware > Default Input, but the issue persists for some users.


Our tipster Shen took his MacBook Pro to the Genius Bar at an Apple Store in Canada and was provided with an over $600 repair quote for his 2018 15-inch MacBook Pro. The price is so high because Apple replaces the entire top case assembly containing the speakers, keyboard, trackpad, and battery.

It's unclear if Adobe, Apple, or both companies are at fault. We've reached out to both Adobe and Apple for comment.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Neutral)

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Apple Exploring New Glass Panel MacBook Keyboards That Could End Sticky Key Problems

Apple is exploring a new keyboard design that could eventually replace its butterfly switch MacBook keyboards and finally solve the problem of "sticky" or inconsistently functioning keys.


Issues that Apple has acknowledged can occur with some current MacBook keyboards are widely believed to be caused by dust or other particulates getting lodged in the butterfly mechanism underneath the keycaps, which are shallower than those on previous-generation MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards with traditional scissor switch mechanisms.

In its 2018 MacBook Pro models, Apple quietly introduced a thin silicone membrane underneath keyboard keys, which is an attempt to solve the issue of dust and crumbs from getting stuck. But a new patent suggests the company is researching a totally new approach to the way keyboards are designed that could eradicate the problem for good.

Published last week by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and first spotted by AppleInsider, the patent application called "Computer with keyboard" describes a keyboard that replaces movable keys with a glass sheet that includes raised sections to designate the tactile location of individual keys.

When a raised key section is pressed, the keyboard detects the input pressure for that key and processes as a typical key press. The concept differs from the featureless plain of a virtual onscreen keyboard because the raised sections allow the user to feel where their fingers should rest in relation to the individual keys.

Raised glass key concepts from Apple's patent application

The patent describes how an additional level of tactile feedback could be provided by a raised side wall around individual raised keys that could deform with each press, while an underlying layer could serve to "push" the key back into place.

Meanwhile, key symbols could lie on a separate later underneath the glass panel, which would make it easier to change the layout for different regions, languages, or even applications. The patent also proposes using side sections around the keyboard that could double up as a trackpad.

As expected, the glass keyboard could have the effect of making the keyboard thinner and allowing more room for other components to be housed in the notebook chassis.Apple has filed patents for keyboards in the past, included one that uses a touchscreen panel similar the Touch Bar, but that extends to the entire keyboard layout, but this is the first patent to emphasize the use of individually raised glass elements that mimic traditional tactile feedback.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Tag: patent
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Neutral)

This article, "Apple Exploring New Glass Panel MacBook Keyboards That Could End Sticky Key Problems" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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‘Flexgate’ Display Issues Affecting 2016 MacBook Pro and Later

Some 2016 and later MacBook Pro models appear to be displaying issues with uneven backlighting caused by a delicate and easy-to-break flex cable, which has been dubbed "flexgate."

Impacted machines can feature uneven lighting at the bottom of the screen, which looks a bit like a "stage light" effect, and the display can eventually fail entirely.

Image via MacRumors reader SourceSunToM

What's the cause?


According to repair site iFixit, which first highlighted the problem, 2016 and later MacBook Pro machines are using thin, fragile display flex cables that are prone to malfunctioning with repeated closing and opening of the MacBook Pro's display.

The flex cables are loosely wrapped around the display controller board and when the MacBook's display is opened, the cables are pulled tighter, leading to tears and problems over time.

Image via iFixit

iFixit says the backlight cable is usually the one to break first, leading to backlighting issues and eventual display failure.

Which models are affected?


The issue can impact any 13 or 15-inch MacBook Pro model manufactured in 2016, 2017, or 2018, though it appears to be affecting Touch Bar models more frequently.

Apple introduced a redesigned MacBook Pro in 2016, and this was the first to use the new flex cable. Older MacBook Pro models are not impacted because they use a more durable wire that was routed through the hinge instead of around it, mitigating the stress of repeated display openings.

The new MacBook Air models could also eventually be impacted. While they use a different display cable design, iFixit says the cables also wrap over the display board and could potentially exhibit the same failure. It's not clear yet if that will happen, however.

How long does it take for the problem to show up?


When you first buy a MacBook Pro, the flex cable functions perfectly. With repeated closing and opening of the MacBook Pro's lid, however, the durability can decline, leading to the display issues.

Since it takes time for the cable to break down, machines experiencing this issue generally do not display it for several months to years after purchase. Because it takes time to show up, affected MacBook Pro models may no longer be under the one-year warranty.

What do I do if my MacBook Pro has this issue?


If your MacBook Pro has this display issue, the first step is visiting an Apple retail store or contacting Apple support.

Unfortunately, when this problem surfaces, many MacBook Pro models are older than a year and no longer covered by the standard one-year warranty. Those who have an extended AppleCare+ warranty will be able to get their repairs covered by Apple.

Customers who do not have AppleCare+ may be required to pay out of pocket for repairs. While it's a simple cable that needs replacing, because of the way the MacBook Pro is designed, the flex cable is integrated into the display and requires the entire display assembly to be replaced.

This can cost upwards of $600 for customers who are out of the warranty period.

There have been reports of customers no longer under the one-year warranty that have been offered free or reduced cost repairs from Apple, but others have had to pay full price. Without a consistent policy in place, repair outcomes will vary.

How many people are affected?


Just how many MacBook Pro models are experiencing this issue remains unknown, but a growing number of complaints have been surfacing over the course of the last few months. There have been complaints on the MacRumors forums and the Apple Support Communities.

What does Apple have to say?


Apple hasn't commented on the issue at this point in time, and there is no repair program in place. Impacted users have started a website and a petition with the aim of getting Apple to offer free repairs via an extended warranty program.

Discuss this issue


If you have a MacBook Pro experiencing this flexcable issue, check out the ongoing discussion on the MacRumors forums where are users are sharing their experiences with Apple support, replacement machines, repair costs, and more.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Neutral)

This article, "'Flexgate' Display Issues Affecting 2016 MacBook Pro and Later" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Guides, How Tos, and Tips for New Mac Owners

Those of you lucky enough to get a new Mac for the holidays will want to check out our collection of Mac how tos and guides to learn the ins and outs of your new machine.

Regardless of whether you're new to the Mac or are upgrading from an older model, there's likely to be a useful tip or trick in here for you. Most of this information applies to all of Apple's latest Macs, from desktops to notebooks.


Beginner Tips

macOS Mojave Features

Security Tips

Continuity and Other Product Tips

Mac App Features

iCloud

Hidden Tricks

Advanced Features

Mac App Recommendations


Every few months we do a video series where we recommend a useful selection of Mac apps, and these articles are worth checking out if you're looking for great Mac apps for your new Mac.

Tips and Tricks Videos











More Info


Know other great Mac-related tips and tricks that MacRumors readers should be aware of? Let us know in the comments.

For more details on Apple's newest 2018 Macs, check out our roundups: MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and Mac mini.

Related Roundups: Mac mini, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro

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Intel Unveils Next-Generation ‘Sunny Cove’ Processors and Graphics Appropriate for 2019 Macs

Intel today introduced Sunny Cove, its next-generation processor microarchitecture designed to increase performance and power efficiency.


Sunny Cove microarchitecture, built on a 10nm process, will be the basis for Intel's next-generation Core and Xeon processors later next year according to the company, making them appropriate for potential 2019 models of the MacBook, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, iMac, iMac Pro, Mac Pro, and Mac mini.

Intel also unveiled new Gen11 integrated graphics with up to double the performance of its Gen9 graphics paired with Skylake-based processors. Gen11 graphics will support 4K video streams and 8K content creation in constrained power situations and feature Intel's Adaptive Sync technology for smoother gaming.

Intel did not provide a comparison of Gen11 and Gen10 graphics, paired with Cannon Lake-based processors.

For those who are ever-confused by Intel's roadmap, it is believed that Sunny Cove processors paired with Gen11 graphics will be called Ice Lake, which succeeds Coffee Lake, Whiskey Lake, Amber Lake, and Cannon Lake.

Intel reaffirmed its plan to introduce a discrete graphics processor by 2020, providing Apple with another option beyond its current provider AMD and former provider Nvidia for future MacBook Pro, iMac, iMac Pro, and Mac Pro models.

Intel has essentially been iterating on its Skylake microarchitecture since 2015, so it is refreshing that the chipmaker is finally moving on to something new. But with rumors of Macs switching to custom ARM-based processors as early as 2020, it might not be long after Sunny Cove that Apple moves on too.

Related Roundups: iMac, Mac Pro, MacBook Pro, iMac Pro

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Better Than Black Friday: Save Up to $500 Off 2018 MacBook Pro and Up to $290 Off 2018 Mac Mini

Apple-authorized reseller B&H is offering up to $500 off select 15-inch 2018 MacBook Pro models today as part of its Cyber Monday sale, while supplies last. That's even better than its Black Friday deals on the latest MacBook Pro lineup. These are brand-new-in-box models like those sold on Apple.com.


Apple authorized-reseller Expercom is also offering up to $500 off the 2018 MacBook Pro and up to $290 off a few higher-end 2018 Mac mini configurations, marking the best deal we've seen on the new Mac mini.

While most resellers are currently offering just $50 off the new Mac mini, Expercom is able to offer up to $290 off because the discounted models are configured-to-order with Expercom-installed RAM. Expercom is an Apple Authorized Service Provider, so this doesn't affect warranty or AppleCare eligibility.

2018 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar


B&H is also offering more run-of-the-mill discounts of $100 to $200 off select 13-inch 2018 MacBook Pro models for Cyber Monday.

2018 Mac mini



Note: These particular Mac mini configurations are equipped with Expercom-installed RAM, not Apple RAM. Expercom is an Apple Authorized Service Provider, so this does not affect warranty or AppleCare eligibility.Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission, which helps us keep the site running.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Neutral)

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