CES 2019: Nanoleaf Shows Off New Hexagon-Shaped Canvas Light Panels, Upcoming Grid Mounting Option

Nanoleaf, the company that makes lighting panels designed for walls and ceilings, is showing off an upcoming product at CES -- hexagon-shaped light panels.

Nanoleaf currently offers triangle-shaped light panels and square-shaped Canvas panels, a new product introduced in December. The six-sided Hexagon tiles are similar to the Canvas, but come in a unique hexagon design.


Like the square Canvas tiles, the Hexagons are touch enabled, so you can use taps, swipes, and other gestures to do things like swap scenes, turn the tiles on and off, adjust brightness, and more. Up to 500 Hexagons can be connected together and controlled with a single Control Hexagon, though additional power supplies are required for each group of 25.

The Hexagons are in the early stages of development and are set to be released in the fourth quarter of 2019. Pricing is not available for the Hexagon setup, but the Nanoleaf Canvas, which has similar capabilities, is priced at


Nanoleaf is also showcasing its Mounting Grid solution for the Nanoleaf Canvas, which is designed for commercial installations and lets users snap the light squares into place for a secure setup. The Nanoleaf Canvas Mounting Grid will be available in the third quarter of 2019.


For those attending the show, Nanoleaf has an Infinity Lights Room on display, which it calls an "explorative journey through sight, sound, and touch." Nanoleaf Canvas games like Whack-A-Mole, "Canvas" Crush, and Pacman will also be shown off.


This article, "CES 2019: Nanoleaf Shows Off New Hexagon-Shaped Canvas Light Panels, Upcoming Grid Mounting Option" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Nanoleaf’s New Touch-Enabled Canvas Offers Up Fun, Interactive Mood Lighting

Nanoleaf's Canvas, launching today, is the company's second HomeKit-enabled mood lighting product that follows its popular triangle-shaped Light Panels. Rather than using triangle lights this time around, Nanoleaf designed the Canvas to have a square shape with multiple connector ports for more design versatility.

What's more, the Canvas is touch enabled and puts thousands of lighting scenes at your fingertips without the need to use an app. The app and HomeKit availability are still available though, offering up multiple ways to control the lighting panels.


Design


Unlike the iconic triangle design of the Light Panels, Nanoleaf has designed the Canvas with a new square shape. Each Canvas square measures in at just about six inches on all sides.

When conceptualizing the Canvas, Nanoleaf originally planned to offer plain squares with uniform lighting across, but this wasn't possible. Each square instead has a noticeable cross shape in it, dividing it into four. The individual squares still light up in one single color, but you will see the crosshairs within each one.


I don't mind the crosshairs and in some ways they make the Canvas more visually interesting, but it could be a turn off for customers who were hoping for flat, uniform lighting across the entire square.

There are eight Canvas Light Squares and one Control Square, which needs to be centrally situated and accessible to touch because it's the square that features specific touch-based controls for the entire Canvas system, though all squares respond to touch.


The Canvas squares are more versatile than the previous-generation Light Panels, with multiple connection points on each square to allow for a wider range of designs that are offset rather than fully connected at each side.


Small rectangular connectors are used to connect two squares together, allowing for hundreds of designs. You get nine squares with the standard Canvas kit, and you can purchase an additional four with expansion kits that Nanoleaf is offering. Most of the photos in this review feature a total of 13 squares.

As with the Nanoleaf Light Panels, you can add on additional Canvas squares, up to 500 in fact, so you could theoretically cover an entire wall, though it would cost an absolute fortune.

Canvas compared to Light Panels

Canvas squares are attached to a wall with 3M adhesive like the previous-generation Light Panels. 3M adhesive is meant to be wall safe, but on certain walls, it definitely has the potential to cause damage, so that's something to be aware of. Because of the adhesive, it's best to decide on a design well ahead of time and a design that you can stick with for a long time because it is not convenient to re-arrange these squares.
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Nanoleaf Previews New ‘Canvas’ Square Lighting Panels That Work With HomeKit

Nanoleaf, the company known for its HomeKit-enabled triangular Light Panels, is expanding into new shapes with the Nanoleaf Canvas.

Nanoleaf Canvas features square-shaped touch-enabled panels that can be set to hundreds of different colors. With just a touch, you can activate the light panels, increase or decrease brightness, or change them to another color.


Nanoleaf's Canvas panels were initially shown off at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show in January, but they also made an appearance at the IFA trade show in Berlin this week, where the company offered up new details on the product.

Both CNET and Digital Trends were able to get some hands-on time with the upcoming light panels and have shared some thoughts.

According to Digital Trends, the Canvas is "more versatile" than the current triangular light panels, with touch "[elevating] the product to a whole new level."

Like the existing Nanoleaf Light Panels, the upcoming Canvas panels are HomeKit enabled and can be controlled using the Nanoleaf app or various Siri voice commands. They can also be incorporated into scenes with other HomeKit products.

The Canvas attaches to walls, the ceiling, or furniture using adhesive pads, much like the current Light Panels, and users can arrange them in any desired pattern. Connectors join the squares together.

Up to 500 panels can be connected to a single base station with the Canvas, allowing for entire wall setups outfitted with the lights.

CNET was told that while the original plan was to get rid of the cross-shaped divider in the middle of the panels, the feature is now going to remain in place in the launch version of the device.

There will be no more dedicated control accessory, with one of the panels in the starter kit instead offering touch button icons along the bottom edge. An on/off button will be included, as will a new shuffle button that will change the colors of the device.

Nanoleaf has also added a button for selecting favorite presets and turning on an included microphone so the panels can connect to the music you're listening to.

Canvas will launch on December 1, with Nanoleaf planning to sell a 9-panel starter kit for $199. Interested customers can sign up for a pre-order invitation list on the Nanoleaf website.


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Nanoleaf’s New Dodecahedron-Shaped Remote Gives You Access to 12 HomeKit Scenes

Nanoleaf's new 12-sided light-up remote joins its existing Nanoleaf Light Panels and Nanoleaf Rhythm, adding a whole slew of smartphone-free physical control options for your HomeKit setup in one easy-to-use accessory.

The Nanoleaf Remote is bigger than button and remote devices from other companies, but it offers access to many more scenes and as you'll see in my review, it's a great value if you already own a Nanoleaf setup and want a simple iPhone-free control method that anyone in the household can use.


For people unfamiliar with Nanoleaf, the company makes the Nanoleaf Light Panels, a HomeKit-enabled set of flat, triangle-shaped lights that connect together in a range of different user-designed configurations, providing both light and art. The Light Panels have LEDs inside and can be set to display dozens of different colors and patterns, which make up different light recipes.

I've had a Nanoleaf setup for more than a year, and it continues to be one of my favorite HomeKit products. The Remote is specifically designed for users who already have Nanoleaf Light Panels.

Design


Nanoleaf's Remote has a design that's not quite like any other HomeKit-enabled remote-style device on the market, with dodecahedron shape where each side activates a different scene.

The remote, which is a little bigger than palm sized, is made from a white plastic that admittedly feels a bit cheap, but it doesn't look bad sitting on a desk.


When the remote arrives, it comes in two halves, with one empty side and a one side that houses the batteries, an LED light, and the mechanism that provides a slight vibration whenever a new scene is activated. Two AA batteries (included in the package) fit into the battery compartment to provide power.


Once the batteries have been inserted, the two halves of the remote snap together. I wasn't quite able to get a perfect, seamless fit between the two halves, but that could be operator error.


I'm not sure how long the batteries are meant to last, but after about two weeks of use, the battery level is down to 85 percent. I suspect the batteries will need to be swapped out every few months, which is similar to other battery-powered HomeKit devices I own.

Setup


Setting up the Remote took less than 30 seconds using the Nanoleaf app, and it was as simple as the setup for any other HomeKit product. Under the Remote section of the app, there's an "Add Accessory" option, which requires the HomeKit code on the inside of the Nanoleaf Remote to be scanned. Once that's complete, the Remote is added to a HomeKit setup and scenes can be set either in the Nanoleaf app or the Home app.


On iOS devices, the Nanoleaf Light Panels and the Nanoleaf Remote work over HomeKit, and a HomeKit setup is required. You can also pair the Remote to the Nanoleaf Rhythm, however, which is required to enable full functionality, such as brightness controls. Sans a Nanoleaf Rhythm, which connects to the Light Panels to allow them to respond to sound, adjusting brightness does not work.
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CES 2018: Nanoleaf Creates New Square-Shaped Light Panels With Touch Controls

After introducing a HomeKit controller in the shape of a dodecahedron, Nanoleaf recently announced the next generation of its popular triangle-shaped Nanoleaf Light Panels. The new panels don't have a name or a price yet, but the company revealed that they are square and include a few feature additions and improvements from the previous generation (via CNET).

Each square panel will include a touch sensitive surface, so you can turn them on or off, dim or increase their brightness, or change to another color preset just by tapping or sliding your finger on them. The base station for the square panels is also said to come with a microphone and motion sensor that can detect motion and alter the lighting flow of the panels as you walk by, for example.

Image via CNET

Nanoleaf has also greatly increased the maximum limit of panels you can connect together. Instead of 30 panels able to connect to one base station (the limit on the triangular panels), up to 1,000 square panels can be outfitted together at once. Still, for every 60 panels strung together you will need a power booster -- set to be sold by Nanoleaf -- in order to "maintain optimal brightness."

Nanoleaf said that it plans to keep the new square panels "as affordable as possible," but the company isn't confirming a price range at CES. The new panels are expected to launch at some point later in 2018.


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CES 2018: Nanoleaf Debuts New $49 HomeKit-Enabled Remote for Controlling Nanoleaf Light Panels

Nanoleaf, the company behind the popular HomeKit-enabled Nanoleaf Light Panels (formerly called the Aurora), today announced the upcoming launch of the Nanoleaf Remote.

The Nanoleaf Remote, priced at $49.99, is a neat-looking dodecahedron-shaped device that's designed to let you change your HomeKit scenes and dim the lights just by manipulating the remote.


There are 12 sides to the Nanoleaf Remote, each of which can be set to a different HomeKit scene. You can choose lighting scenes that are for the Nanoleaf Light Panels, or more complex scenes that incorporate multiple HomeKit products.

While designed to work with the Nanoleaf Light Panels, the Bluetooth-enabled Remote is a standalone device that works with any HomeKit setup so long as you have a Home Hub, aka a Nanoleaf Rhythm module, an Apple TV, or an iPad. Android users will need the Rhythm module for the Remote to work.


Nanoleaf plans to launch the Remote in the spring of 2018, but it will be shown off at CES. Nanoleaf will also be demonstrating Light Panels in new shapes at CES, prior to a launch later in 2018.

Nanoleaf's existing Light Panels with Rhythm module can be purchased from the Nanoleaf website for $230.


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Review: Nanoleaf’s Fun $49 ‘Rhythm’ Add-On Lets Your Aurora Light Setup Respond to Music

Nanoleaf, the company behind the HomeKit-enabled Aurora smart modular lighting system, recently introduced a $49 accessory that allows the Aurora lights to respond to music, adding a whole new sound-based dimension to an already great product.


Called the Nanoleaf Aurora Rhythm, the add-on module is a small three-triangle accessory that snaps right in to an existing Nanoleaf setup using the same plastic connector tabs that connect the Aurora lights together.


It can be plugged in to any of the triangle-shaped lights in an Aurora setup, because all of them are able to provide power to the accessory. Setting up the Rhythm is as simple as attaching it to an Aurora setup -- there are no other steps involved.
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