Apple-Certified Third-Party Lightning to USB-C Cables Expected Early Next Year

Apple-certified Lightning to USB-C cables should be available from select third-party accessory makers starting early next year.


Last week, Apple informed members of its Made for iPhone or "MFi" licensing program that Lightning to USB-C cables for charging and syncing are now permitted to be manufactured. These cables require a new Lightning connector with part number C94, which Made for iPhone program members can now order.

Apple is selling the new Lightning connector to eligible hardware manufacturers for $2.88 per, and it is estimated to ship in six weeks, according to documentation shared with MacRumors by Hong Kong website ChargerLab.



This means that third-party accessory makers enrolled in the Made for iPhone program, such as Anker, Aukey, Belkin, and Incipio, should have the part necessary to create MFi-certified Lightning to USB-C cables by mid-January and, allowing time for production, could be available to purchase by February or March.

A Lightning to USB-C cable is required to fast charge the iPhone 8 and newer with an 18W-plus power adapter. Otherwise, the new C94 connector is expected to provide a maximum of 15W of power with a standard power adapter.

Apple is currently the only retailer of certified Lightning to USB-C cables at a cost of $19 for the one-meter option and $35 for two-meters in the United States. The one-meter cable was originally $25, but it received a price cut in November 2016 alongside some of Apple's other USB-C adapters and cables.

The biggest advantage to third-party Lightning to USB-C cables is that many will likely be significantly less expensive than Apple's own, while still meeting Apple performance standards under the Made for iPhone program. Many third-party options will likely have more durable designs too, such as a braided cable.

Apple first informed its Made for iPhone program members about its plans to allow third-party Lightning to USB-C cables earlier this year.


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Moment Launches MFi-Approved Battery Photo Case for iPhone X and iPhone XS

Smartphone lens maker Moment has begun shipping the first MFi-approved Battery Photo Case compatible with iPhone X and the new iPhone XS.

The battery case first drew interest earlier this year as a Kickstarter campaign highlighting several notable features, some of which are clearly aimed at photographers.


The case has a 3,100mAh built-in battery for charging your iPhone on the go, and it's wireless-charging compatible, so it can be placed on any Qi-compatible charging pad.

The case also features an integrated Lightning port to charge an iPhone X/XS, rather than the typical micro-USB found on charging accessories, while a wrist/neck strap can be easily attached for safety.


In addition, there's a two-stage shutter button on the case for taking pictures, so pressing the button halfway focuses the lens and a full press takes the picture.

The Battery Case is compatible with the Moment lens lineup, which includes telephoto, wide, super fish, macro, and a soon-to-be-released Anamorphic lens.

The case costs $99 and can be ordered today on the Moment website, which will offer upgraded versions for iPhone XS Max and iPhone XR come November.


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Apple Will Soon Let Hardware Developers Make MFi-Certified USB-C to Lightning Cables

Apple will soon allow hardware developers to manufacture Made for iPhone (MFi) certified USB-C to Lightning cables, reports Japanese site Mac Otakara. Apple is said to have recently informed developers who participate in the MFi program about the change.

Right now, there are no Apple-approved USB-C to Lightning cables available for purchase, which means customers who want a USB-C to Lightning cable must purchase one directly from Apple for $19. With the new MFi update, third-party hardware manufacturers will be able to create USB-C to Lightning cables.


These cables are necessary for fast charging the iPhone X, iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and Apple's upcoming 2018 iPhones when paired with an 18W+ power adapter.

Rumors have suggested that Apple is planning to ship its 2018 iPhones with an upgraded power adapter and a USB-C to Lightning cable, enabling fast charging right out of the box with no need to make an additional purchase.

The approval of Made for iPhone USB-C to Lightning cables indicates that this rumor could be true, with Apple and third-party manufacturers starting to make a shift from standard USB-A Lightning cables to the new fast charge compatible USB-C version.

According to Mac Otakara, developers who want to manufacture a Lightning to USB-C cable will need to use a new C94 Lightning connector provided by Apple, which offers a maximum of 15W of charging with a non-fast charging compatible power adapter and 18W with a compatible power adapter.

Apple has also upgraded its other Lightning connectors, charging about 50 cents more for the new technology.
Apple plans to move C48 Lightning connector to C89 Lightning connector, C68 Lightning connector to C78 Lightning connector, ​​C12 Lightning connector to C79 Lightning connector, the price will also be about $ 0.5 higher.
Mac Otakara expects the first third-party USB-C to Lightning cables to start appearing in mid-2019.


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Apple Updates Made For iPhone Licensing Program With USB-C Ports, Lightning to 3.5mm Output Cable

Apple recently updated its Made for iPhone/iPad/iPod (MFi) licensing program to include specifications for USB-C ports and a Lightning to 3.5mm output cable (via 9to5Mac).

With the new specifications, accessory makers will be able to include USB-C ports on MFi-certified charging accessories designed for the iOS and Mac, with those accessories able to use the USB-C cables that ship with new Macs.


Third-party MFi accessories that include Lightning ports are able to offer passthrough charging, but Apple's new specifications do not allow the USB-C port built into an accessory to be used for passthrough charging or syncing of an iOS device.

Apple's documentation suggests speakers and battery packs could benefit from the use of a USB-C port for charging purposes.

As for the Lightning to 3.5mm stereo output plug, it is designed to let users connect to a 3.5mm input using a Lightning port on an iOS device, something that was previously only possible with adapters.

Apple also recently revamped its Made for iPhone/iPad/iPod logos, introducing support for the San Francisco font and replacing device icons with standard Apple logos.


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Apple Updates ‘Made for iPhone, iPad, and iPod’ Logos

Apple has updated its Made for iPhone, Made for iPad, and Made for iPod logos, and accessory makers have 90 days from when the change was announced in mid February to begin using them, according to ChargerLab.

Apple's new Made for iPhone, iPad, and iPod logos via ChargerLab

The new decals look similar, but they have Apple logos in place of iPhone, iPad, and iPod icons. Apple has also moved iPod from first to last in the list, as the iPhone and iPad have long overshadowed the portable media player. The new logos use Apple's San Francisco font, compared to Myriad Pro previously.

Apple's old Made for iPod, iPhone, and iPad logo

Made for iPhone, Made for iPad, and Made for iPod logos inform customers that an electronic accessory has been certified by the developer to meet Apple's performance standards. To use the logos, accessory makers must apply to be a MFi Program licensee, and receive approval from Apple.

MFi-licensed technologies include the Lightning connector, CarPlay, GymKit, HomeKit, game controllers, and hearing aids, among others. MFi Program certification is not required for accessories that only make use of standard Bluetooth profiles supported by iOS, or accessories that only use the 3.5mm headphone jack.

For customers, this isn't a significant change. But, next time you're shopping for Apple-certified accessories, be aware the logos will soon change on packaging. It doesn't appear the similar Made for Apple Watch decal has changed.

(Thanks, Nick!)


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