Maps: What’s New in iOS 13

Apple introduced updates to many of the built-in iOS apps in iOS 13, and Maps is no exception. The updated version of Maps has a long list of new features that are designed to make the Apple Maps app better able to compete with mapping apps from other companies.

There's a new Look Around street view level feature, a Collections feature for aggregating lists of your favorite places, a Favorites option for getting to your most frequently traveled places quickly, and some other smaller updates that are worth knowing about.

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In this guide, we've highlighted all of the new features that are in the Apple Maps app in iOS 13.

Maps Redesign


Apple in iOS 12 debuted a rebuilt, updated Maps app that uses an Apple-designed Maps engine to bring more detailed views of things like foliage, pools, buildings, pedestrian pathways, and more.

The work done in iOS 12 is continuing in iOS 13 as Apple expands the new Maps app to additional states in the U.S. in 2019 and new countries in 2020.


Apple on stage when introducing iOS 13 mentioned these map updates and promised improved detailing for roads, beaches, parks, buildings, and more. Maps in iOS 12 overall looks similar to iOS 13 in states where new Maps have already rolled out, but there could be more detail coming in the future and there are some small changes worth pointing out.

Road Hazards and Traffic Conditions


When viewing the main Maps interface, the app now displays road hazards and traffic conditions so you can see the route ahead at a glance. Previously, this information was available, but only when turn-by-turn directions were activated.


In iOS 13, traffic information is visible on the main map too.

Junction View


iOS 13 adds a Junction View option that's meant to help drivers avoid wrong turns and directional misses by lining them up in the correct lane before a turn or an elevated road.

Siri Directions


Siri gives more natural directions in iOS 13. Instead of saying something like "in 1,000 feet turn left," Siri might instead choose to say "turn left at the next traffic light," which is an easier instruction to follow since there's no distance estimation involved.

Venue Navigation Improvements


When you're navigating to something like a concert at a large venue, Apple Maps now offers up improvements that are better suited towards getting you to your end-point destination.

Real-Time Transit Schedules


The Maps app now includes real-time transit schedules, arrival times, network stops, and system connections for transit directions to provide better overall route planning.


Real-time information like outages, cancellations, and other changes are also listed in the Apple Maps app.


ETA Sharing


There's a new option to share your estimated time of arrival with friends, family, and coworkers. Your ETA will update dynamically, changing even when there's a significant traffic delay.

Flight Status


Maps is now able to display up-to-the-minute information about flight terminals, gate locations, departure times, and more.

Place Cards for Businesses


Place Cards for businesses have been updated to be more helpful and easier to use. You'll see information like times of Today at Apple sessions when looking up an Apple Store, for example, or movie times when looking up a movie theater.


Look Around


Look Around is a new Apple Maps feature that's designed to be Apple's equivalent of Google Street View. Look Around offers up a street-level view of what's around you or a location you search for in the Maps app.


You can use Look Around in the main Apple Maps view whenever there's a pair of binoculars visible. Tapping on the binoculars icon delves into a close-up street level view of the location in a little card, which you can tap again to get to a full screen Look Around view.


Look Around can also be brought up when searching for specific supported locations by tapping on the Look Around card in the search results.


When in Look Around mode, tapping on the display lets you move through the Look Around area, and tapping a spot far off in the distance does a neat zoom in maneuver that's fun to watch.

In Look Around, all notable points of interest, like restaurants, businesses, parks, and more, are highlighted with identifying icons and place names so you can tell what's what.


Look Around is limited to areas where a car can go because it's using data captured from a 360-degree camera on a vehicle. That means you can't zoom into areas like parks or beaches, for example, but you can see what's visible from the street.


Right now, Look Around is limited to parts of California and Nevada, but Apple plans to expand availability over the course of 2019.

Collections


Collections lets you search for and aggregate lists of different locations, such as restaurants you might want to try or places you might want to visit.


Collection lists can be shared, so you can make up lists of places for friends and family visiting you in your city and then share it with them, for example.

Favorites


Favorites is a new Maps feature that lets you search for specific places and then add them to a list. Favorites are meant for places that you visit frequently, and Home and Work are already added by default.


You can add any place you go to often to the Favorites list, such as a favorite restaurant or coffee shop, or a friend's house. Tapping on one of your Favorites brings up directions to that spot right away, so think of it like a speed dial option for Maps.

Maps Feedback Form


Apple introduced a redesigned customer feedback interface in iOS 13, which is designed to make it easier for Apple Maps users to submit corrections for things like incorrect addresses, business locations, or operating hours.

CarPlay


All of the new features introduced in the Maps app in iOS 13, such as Favorites, Collections, and Junction View have been added to CarPlay. The Maps app in CarPlay also provides updated route planning, search, and navigation.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Maps, know of an iOS 13 Maps feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.


This article, "Maps: What's New in iOS 13" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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iOS 13: Everything You Need to Know About Apple’s Find My App

Apple in iOS 13 and iPadOS merged the Find My Friends and the Find My iPhone apps into one app that's just called "Find My," because, well, it's used for finding whatever you need to find.

Find My works similarly to the Find My iPhone and Find My Friends apps that were previously available, but it has a nifty new feature that's designed to let you find your lost devices even when you don't have a WiFi or LTE connection.

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Note that this guide is designed to walk through all of the Find My features on iPhone and iPad, but it also applies to the Mac, which also has a new Find My app in macOS Catalina.


Locating Lost Devices


The Find My app is organized into three sections, accessible by tapping the tabs at the bottom. On the left, you can find people, in the middle, you can find your own devices, and on the right, there's a "Me" tab introduced during the beta testing process.

As with the prior Find My iPhone app, all of your Apple products are listed. Devices where you're signed into iCloud and have the Find My feature enabled will be locatable through the Find My app.


All of your devices are displayed on a map, and you can zoom in or out to get a better picture of their location. Tapping on a single device provides you with options to get directions to its location in Apple Maps, Play a Sound for locating a nearby lost device, or get a notification when it's found if it's offline.


There's an option to mark a device as lost, which locks the lost device, disables Apple Pay, and allows contact information to be put right on the lock screen, and as a last resort, there's a tool for deleting all of your data.

Find My Compatible Devices


Almost all Apple products are Find My compatible, including iPhone, iPad, Macs, Apple Watch, and AirPods.

Family Sharing


If you have Family Sharing enabled, all of your family's devices will be listed in Find My right alongside your own, so you can also find devices from your partner or children through the Find My app.

Locating Friends


The Find My app allows you to locate friends and family members that have shared their location with you. You can view their location using the "People" tab within the Find My app.

The Find My app lists people who have shared their location with you and, if you haven't shared your own location, offers up an option to do so.


Sharing Location


If you press the "Share My Location" button, you can share your own location with any of your contacts even if they haven't shared a location with you. Tapping on a person's name in the list provides an option to bring up their Contacts card for sending a message or an option to get directions to their location.

You'll also find tools for removing friends and turning off your own location sharing with the person if it's a mutual location sharing contact. You can opt to share your own location permanently, for an hour, or until the end of the day.

Notifications


For any person who's sharing a location with you, you can turn on notifications to get notifications when they leave or arrive at a specific location. There's also an option to notify your friend when you leave or arrive at a specific notification.

Me Tab


The "Me" tab in the Find My app displays your current location and includes toggles for sharing location, allowing friend requests, choosing who to receive location updates from, and naming a specific place.


Locating Devices Without a Connection


One of the headline features of iOS 13 is a new Find My option that lets your lost devices be located even when not connected to WiFi or LTE by leveraging Bluetooth and proximity to other nearby Apple devices.

When your lost device is offline but close to another device, it's able to connect to that other device over Bluetooth and relay its location. That means that your devices are more trackable than ever, and there's a better chance you can find a device that's been lost.

The iPad Pro and MacBook in this screenshot are locatable without a connection. The iPad Pro has WiFi turned off while the MacBook was closed.

Tracking a device in this way requires Bluetooth to be enabled because location is shared with another device using Bluetooth. Turning off Bluetooth or power makes your device untrackable, but if it's on, has Bluetooth, and is near another Apple device, it will potentially be trackable even if it can't connect to WiFi or LTE.

You're not going to notice a difference in the Find My app when tracking a device over Bluetooth rather than a cellular or WiFi connection -- it simply shows up in the list of devices like any other device that does have a standard connection. Offline devices do have their distance from you listed in gray instead of blue, and you can tell when the location data was last updated by the time listed.

In testing, setting an iPad into Airplane mode and enabling Bluetooth continued to allow the iPad to be tracked thanks to another nearby iPhone, but turning off Bluetooth prevented it from being found even from a device to device connection.

How It Works


Implementing the device to device location feature while preserving privacy was quite a feat and the technical details of how it works are quite complicated, but Apple has given a high level overview of how it functions.

Basically, it's been designed with an encryption system that prevents people from abusing the feature for doing things like tracking you. That encryption system makes your personal location unavailable to people aiming to intercept your device's Bluetooth signal and from Apple itself.

Find My requires Apple users to have at least two devices. Each of your devices emits a constantly changing public key that nearby Apple devices pick up, encrypt, and upload with your geolocation data.

To decrypt that location signal, you need a second Apple device logged in with your Apple ID credentials and protected with two-factor authentication. Essentially, only your own devices can decrypt the encrypted location signal that's being sent from a lost device, no one, not even Apple, can intercept it and locate you or your devices.

As an example scenario, if you were on an airplane, had your iPhone in Airplane Mode with Bluetooth on, and then left it behind on the plane accidentally, it would potentially still be trackable.

In this situation, a flight attendant or an airport worker with an iPhone might come across it. The flight attendant's own iPhone would connect to your lost iPhone over Bluetooth by picking up your public key.

The flight attendant's iPhone would then upload your device's encrypted location and a hash of your public key (for identification purposes) to Apple's servers, where one of your own devices will be able to receive the encrypted info and decrypt it to make the offline device able to be tracked.

Privacy


Because the entire Find My system is end-to-end encrypted, other people can't get the location of your devices using Bluetooth, nor can Apple. Lost devices are trackable only by you.

Device Impact


According to Apple, Find My's background Bluetooth location tracking feature uses just tiny bits of data piggybacked on existing network traffic so there's no impact on device battery life, data usage, or privacy.

Find My Rumors


Rumors have suggested Apple plans to expand Find My's functionality through the introduction of a new hardware product that's similar to the Tile Bluetooth item tracker.

Apple is said to be working on a tag that can be attached to any item that would allow it to be tracked. Like Tile, Apple's rumored tracker reportedly lets users receive a notification when a device gets too far from the tag, potentially cutting down on lost items.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Find My, know of a feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

This article, "iOS 13: Everything You Need to Know About Apple's Find My App" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Photos: What’s New in iOS 13

The Photos app is one of the most important apps on the iPhone and iPad, housing all of the pictures that you've taken and offering up editing tools to make those images even better.

Over the course of the last few years, Apple has been steadily improving the Photos app with machine learning and other technologies to present your pictures in new and unique ways so you can do more than just view your photos - you can relive your memories. iOS 13 is no exception and has a slew of improvements that make the Photos app more useful than ever.

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Updated Photos Tab Organization


The main Photos tab in the Photos app has been overhauled in iOS 13, with a new design that's meant to put your best photos front and center. In addition to the iOS 12-style option to view all of your photos, there are new options to view them by day, month, and year.

Each of the time-based viewing options cuts out clutter, like screenshots, photos of receipts, and duplicate images, displaying all of your best memories without the cruft. Photos are displayed in a tiled view, with your best images displayed as large squares surrounded by smaller related photos.


The Days view in the Photos app shows you the photos that you've taken organized by each day, while the Months view presents photos categorized into events so you can see the best parts of the month at a glance.


In the Years view, you can see subsections for each year. In the current year, it will flip through each month automatically so you can get an overview of each month, but Apple did something unique for past years. When you tap into an older year, like 2018 or 2017, you'll see photos taken around the same time of year.


So, for example, if it's June and you tap the 2017 tab in June, you'll see photos that were taken in June 2017. Tapping into a specific year in this view swaps over to the Month view, where you can further tap into a target month, which then swaps to the Day view. You can also swipe a finger over the photos in the Years view to see a glimpse of key images from each month.

In all of the sections, Apple highlights titles like location, concert performances, holidays, and more, so you know where your photos were taken.

The new Photos tab is separate from the "For You" section introduced in iOS 12. For You also shows you curated photos, but the Photos tab organizes them around specific dates while For You focuses on aggregating content from multiple dates like beach days, trips, specific people, pets, and more.


Both the new Photos tab and the For You view are great for surfacing your best memories, making the Photos app a great tool just for browsing through your photo library.

Autoplay Live Photos and Videos


In the new Photos tab, Live Photos and videos will autoplay silently so you can see a glimpse of action in the Day view, which brings the Photos tab to life and makes looking through your images a more dynamic, fun experience.

Extended Live Photos


When you have two or more Live Photos taken within 1.5 seconds of one another, there's a new Live Photos option that will play both at once as a short little video rather than just a quick animation in the Day view of the Photos tab.

Birthday Highlights


For your contacts you have photos of in the People album, if you have their birthdays assigned to them in the Contacts app, Apple will show you photos of the person in the "For You" section of the Photos app.

Screen Recordings Album


In iOS 13, if you capture a screen recording, it will be saved to a new Screen Recordings album automatically, much like screenshots go in the Screenshots album.

Overhauled Editing Interface


Apple in iOS 13 updated the editing interface in Photos, which you can get to whenever you tap on the "Edit" button on one of your pictures.

Rather than hiding editing tools down at the bottom of the image in a series of small icons, iOS 13 puts them front and center in a new slider that lets you scroll through each adjustment option. It kicks off with the standard Auto adjust, but if you swipe to the left on the editing tools, you can choose the specific adjustment that you need.


You can tap each edit you apply to see what the photo looks like before and after, so it's clear what each of the adjustments is doing. This new interface more closely mirrors third-party photo editing apps and puts more tools right at iPhone users' fingertips, making photo editing easier for everyone.

The editing tab in the Photos app has been updated to account for the new editing interface. When you open up edits, the adjustment tools are front and center, but if you tap the concentric circles icon on the left you can get to Live Photos adjustments where you can choose a new Key Photo.

On the right of the adjustment tool, there are filter options, and next to that, options for cropping and changing orientation.

Intensity Slider


For each editing tool, there's a slider that lets you tweak the intensity of the adjustment, which allows for more controlled edits than before. So, for example, you can select the "Exposure" adjustment tool to brighten or darken a photo and then use the slider to quickly get the desired effect. Intensity has specific numbers, so it's easy to tell how much of an effect has been applied at a glance.


New Editing Tools


In addition to overhauling the editing interface in Photos, Apple also added new tools for things like adjusting vibrance, white balance, sharpness, and more. Below, there's a list of all of the editing tools available in Photos in iOS 13:

  • Auto

  • Exposure

  • Brilliance

  • Highlights

  • Shadows

  • Contrast

  • Brightness

  • Black Point

  • Saturation

  • Vibrance

  • Warmth

  • Tint

  • Sharpness

  • Definition

  • Noise Reduction

  • Vignette


Apple has also improved the auto cropping and auto straightening features designed to make your photos look better with just a tap. When editing, you can use pinch to zoom to see the close-up details of a photo to get a better look at just what edits are doing to a particular area in an image.

Filter Intensity Adjustments


Though there are new editing tools available, the filters that Apple has long provided are there too. Filters in iOS 13 are more functional because the intensity of the filter can be adjusted using a new slider tool.


High-Key Mono Lighting Effect


iOS 13 adds a new effect to Portrait Lighting, High-Key Mono. High-Key Mono is a black and white effect that's similar to Stage Light Mono, but designed to add a white background rather than a black one.


High-Key Mono Lighting is limited to the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR.

Portrait Lighting Adjustment Tools


The Portrait Lighting effects added to Portrait Mode photos can be adjusted with a new slider option in iOS 13, which allows you to further tweak the added lighting. It's designed to allow you to adjust the intensity of the lighting, which can drastically change the look of a portrait image.


Portrait Lighting adjustment tools are limited to the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR.

Video Editing


There have been photo editing tools available in the Photos app for quite some time, but in iOS 13, many of the same tools are available for editing video for the first time.

Apple offers editing tools to adjust parameters like exposure, contrast, saturation, brightness, and more, plus there are built-in filters that you can apply. You can also use the same Auto adjust feature in videos that's long been available for photos to get a quick improvement.



Video editing tools, like photo editing tools, feature sliders to control the intensity of your adjustments so you can make dramatic or subtle changes to the lighting, brightness, and other elements and there continue to be available tools for adjusting video length.

There are also tools for straightening a video, adjusting the vertical alignment, adjusting the horizontal alignment, flipping the video, changing the orientation of the video, and cropping it.

None of these video editing tools were available in iOS 12, and these kinds of video edits have in the past required iMovie or another video editing app, but now video editing is as simple and straightforward as photo editing.

The Photos app isn't going to be suitable for complicated video edits where footage needs to be added or removed, but for simple tweaks, it's a useful tool that's going to be easy for even novice videographers to use.



Guide Feedback


Have questions about Photos, know of an iOS 13 Photos feature we left out, or or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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macOS Catalina and iPadOS: How the New Sidecar Feature Works to Turn an iPad Into a Secondary Mac Display

macOS Catalina and iPadOS include support for a new feature called Sidecar, designed to let you use your iPad as a secondary display for your Mac. Sidecar is quick, simple to use, and can either mirror content on your Mac or turn it into a secondary display for extra screen real estate no matter where you are.

This guide covers everything you need to know about Sidecar, from how to use it to compatibility to Apple Pencil integration.

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How to Activate Sidecar


Using Sidecar requires a compatible Mac running macOS Catalina and a compatible iPad running iOS 13. There are multiple ways to activate Sidecar, all of which can be done from Catalina.

The easiest way to get to Sidecar is to use the AirPlay interface on the Mac. When you click the AirPlay icon at the top of the Menu bar (it's the one that looks like a screen with an arrow), if you have an iPad that's compatible with Sidecar, it will show up in the AirPlay list.


From there, simply choose the iPad that you want to connect to and it will automatically turn on and be activated as a secondary Mac display.

You can also get to Sidecar by clicking and holding the green window expansion button on any Mac app, and you can access Sidecar in the Sidecar section of System Preferences.

Using Sidecar


Sidecar is designed as a secondary Mac display, so it works like any other secondary display you might use with your Mac. You can drag windows from the Mac to the iPad and vice versa, and interact with both using your Mac's trackpad.


Sidecar is not designed to work with touch gestures, so while you can tap some on-screen control options or scroll through some webpages, you're mostly meant to control things with either the trackpad or mouse of your Mac or with the Apple Pencil. That's because Sidecar is not meant to bring touch controls to Mac - it's just a secondary display option.

Apple Pencil Integration


When using Sidecar, the Apple Pencil (first or second generation depending on your iPad) serves as a mouse alternative for clicking, selecting, and other on-screen control tasks. Think of the Apple Pencil as a mouse or trackpad when using it with Sidecar.


In apps like Photoshop and Illustrator, the Apple Pencil does even more. You can draw right in Photoshop or other similar Mac apps, which transforms the iPad into a graphics tablet for your Mac, not unlike a Wacom graphics tablet. It's a great way to create art, edit photos, and more with the interactivity of your Apple Pencil but the power of your Mac.

Keyboard Integration


When using a keyboard like Apple's Smart Keyboard with an iPad, the keyboard serves as an alternative to the Mac keyboard, letting you type like you would on the Mac in any open window.


Wired or Wireless Connection


Your Mac can be connected to your iPad over a wired or wireless connection. For a wired connection, you'll need an appropriate cable, such as a USB-C to USB-C cable for the newest iPad Pros or a USB-C to Lightning cable for Lightning-equipped iPad models.

Using a wired connection allows your iPad to charge and it should cut down on any latency issues you might see from a poor wireless connection. Using Sidecar over a wireless connection works well, though it might not work quite as well when connection speeds are low.

Using a wireless connection requires your iPad to be within 10 meters of your Mac, which is actually pretty far.

Touch Bar and Controls


Sidecar puts a control sidebar on your iPad for doing things like hiding or showing the dock, bringing up the on-screen keyboard, closing a window, or accessing controls like Shift, Command, Option, and Control.

Sidecar also adds a Touch Bar to the bottom of the iPad, which is the same as the Touch Bar on the Touch Bar-compatible MacBook Pro models. Even if your Mac doesn't naturally have a Touch Bar, these Touch Bar controls will show up.

Touch Bar controls will pop up for Apple apps and for third-party apps that have implemented support for the Touch Bar.

Accessing Sidecar Settings


If you click on the AirPlay icon while your Mac is connected to your iPad, you can see some quick controls for doing things like hiding the sidebar or hiding the Touch Bar, and there's also an option to swap between using the iPad as a separate display or mirroring the Mac's current display.

Additional Sidecar options can be found by opening up System Preferences and choosing the Sidecar section. In this spot, you can move the sidebar to the left or the right of the screen, move the Touch Bar to the bottom or the top of the screen, or enable double tap on Apple Pencil.

Compatibility


Apple hasn't provided specific details on which Macs are compatible with Sidecar, but macOS Catalina's code suggests it is limited to newer Macs. Sidecar works with the following machines:

Many older machines are blacklisted from taking advantage of Sidecar, but some older Macs can use the feature via a Terminal command provided by developer Steve Troughton-Smith. There are few details on this method, but those interested can check out our original article on compatibility.

Sidecar should be compatible with all iPads that are capable of running iPadOS, which includes the following models:

  • All iPad Pros

  • iPad (6th generation)

  • iPad (5th generation)

  • iPad mini (5th generation)

  • iPad mini 4

  • iPad Air (3rd generation)

  • iPad Air 2


All of the compatibility information above will be updated once we hear word from Apple on which iPads and Macs are getting official Sidecar support.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Sidecar, know of a feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.


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iPhone Accessories Guide: Our Favorite Picks for 2019

The iPhone has been around for more than 10 years, which has given accessory manufacturers time to come up with all manner of useful add-ons that enhance, protect, and charge your iPhone.

There are so many iPhone accessories on the market that we can't go through them all, but in this guide, we're highlighting some products that we think are among the best accessories you can get for the iPhone. We'll be updating this guide over time to add new items, remove old items, and highlight great products we come across, so make sure to check back in from time to time.


Cases and Screen Protectors


There are an endless number of iPhone cases and screen protectors on the market, and here at MacRumors, we've tested much of what's available. I'm not going to go through every iPhone case that you can get because that list would be endless, but will instead highlight some of the favorites that we've used over the years and some of the favorite brands of our readers.

- Silicone Cases from Apple ($35 to $39) - Apple designs iPhone cases to go along with its iPhones, and because these are Apple created, they're a perfect fit for every iPhone. Apple's silicone cases are grippy, thin enough not to add a lot of bulk, and, most importantly, protective. I've been using silicone cases almost exclusively on my iPhones since the iPhone 6, and through many, many drops, some quite significant, my iPhones have always survived intact. If you don't like the feel of silicone, which some people don't, Apple also has a great selection of leather cases that are just as protective.
Continue reading "iPhone Accessories Guide: Our Favorite Picks for 2019"

Apple Trade-In Guide: Getting the Most Money Back

Trading in an old iPhone, iPad, or Mac can get you some extra cash to spend on a new device. Depending on where you decide to sell your device, you can get cash back or a gift card for a specific company like Apple, Amazon, or Best Buy.

What's most important to know when trading in a device is that there's no one best site or service. There are so many options out there and prices vary based on device and promotions that might be running, so your absolute best bet if you want to do a trade-in using a trade-in site is to spend 15 to 20 minutes doing price checks on some of the most prominent trade-in sites listed below.


Using a comparison site like Flipsy or uSell to compare trade-in prices can also be beneficial when you want to do some shopping around to get the best price for your particular device.

Trade-in Options


There are generally three options when you have an old device you want to get rid of: Trading it in through a company like Apple or a service like Gazelle, selling it in person via a service like Craigslist, or selling it to a person online through a service like eBay or Swappa.

Using a trade-in service is always going to be more simple than selling to a person, but the convenience of doing so will cost you. You're never going to get quite as much money from a trade-in service as you can get from direct sales, but there are some tips and tricks worth knowing before considering a trade-in.

Device Condition


Device condition is going to make a huge difference in the amount of money that you're able to get back for an iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Most trade-in sites offer tiered payback based on condition, like Good, Fair, and Poor.

A functional device in good condition with no scratches or other damage is going to fetch the most money. Some sites will let small wear and tear issues slide, while others will deduct cash if a device isn't in perfect condition.


All trade-in sites will ask you specific questions about the condition of your device, making sure it powers on, is fully functional, has no display issues, and no cracks.

Cracks, display issues, and other problems will drastically lower the amount of money you can get for a device, and some trade-in sites will refuse to take broken devices at all.


Services that receive your device will inspect it on their end to make sure the quality of your device matches up with how you described it. Most services have an option to pay less if the condition doesn't match up or send it back to you.

Activation Lock


You'll also be asked to make sure Activation Lock has been disabled by turning off Find My iPhone, which is standard operating procedure when trading in a device. Companies ask this to make sure the device will be usable after it's turned in.


Apple Trade-ins


If you're trading in an Apple product and want to upgrade to another Apple product, going the Apple trade-in route is a great idea. As seen in the price comparison listings below, Apple offers fair prices -- sometimes much higher than other trade-in sites -- and provides money for your old products in the form of an Apple gift card.

The Apple gift card you receive can be put towards a purchase from the Apple online store or an Apple retail store, but Apple trade-ins are limited in scope because there's no option to get cash.


Apple will send you a full trade-in kit so you can box up your device properly and send it in conveniently without having to hunt down a box and shipping materials.

Major Retailer Trade-in Programs


Companies like Best Buy, Amazon, and Target have trade-in programs, but they're generally not as good as Apple's trade-in program and are not the best for Apple devices.

Best Buy's trade-in program offers Best Buy gift cards, Amazon's offers Amazon gift cards, and Target's offers Target gift cards or cash via PayPal.

If, for some reason, you prefer to do a trade-in in person to get a gift card or cash right away, Target and Best Buy both offer in-store trade-ins. Other big box retailers like Walmart, Game Stop, and all carrier stores offer trade-in options. With carriers, you can often trade your device in when purchasing a new smartphone to get a discount.

There are so many that we can't go through them all, but it's worth knowing that all of them offer similar prices for devices, though some stores will sometimes do promos.

Other Trade-in Sites


There are dozens of trade-in sites that want to buy your old gear. We'll list a few of the most popular below, but remember, as noted above, it's a good idea to shop around and visit a few sites to get price comparisons for your specific device.

  • Gazelle - Gazelle is perhaps one of the best known independent trade-in sites. Gazelle's prices are not always the best, but it does offer promotions at times when new devices come out, and it's streamlined with a free shipping label provided. Gazelle has trade-in ecoATMs at various locations where you can get cash back instantly.

  • Decluttr - Based on our pricing spot checks, Decluttr offers trade-in prices on Apple devices that are higher than most other trade-in sites. There are a few mixed reviews to be aware of, though, with reports that Decluttr sometimes drops price offers or takes several days to provide payment.

  • BuyBackWorld - BuyBackWorld is another site that offers higher than average trade-in prices. Most reviews are positive as with Decluttr, but there are some negatives such as complaints about checks taking a long time to arrive. The site's customer service is also said to be lacking.

  • MacRumors Trade-in - Lots of tech sites, MacRumors included, offer trade-in programs that will give you cash back for your devices. These services are usually comparable to buyback sites like Gazelle, but aren't typically the best deal you can get. MacRumors' program is through MyPhonesUnlimited and while it's convenient and quick because a box is sent right to you, you can do better if you want to put in more effort.

  • It's Worth More - It's Worth More is similar to Decluttr, offering higher than average prices than you'll get from big box trade-in programs. Reviews for It's Worth More seem to be largely positive, but as with all of these trade-in programs, there are some complaints of offers being lower than expected once the devices are inspected.


Beyond the list here, there are literally dozens if not hundreds of other sites that will buy your old devices, but most of them are fairly similar. We'll be adding to this list if we come across any standout trade-in services that are worth highlighting.

Selling a Device Outright


You're always going to get the best price for an older device selling it yourself either in person using a platform like Craigslist to arrange a meetup or through a service like Swappa or eBay.


When using one of these sites to arrange a sell, your best bet is to search for similar devices to your own so you can see what the general price is, which will help you set your own price. You're generally going to want to price your device in the vicinity of the asking price of other devices so it will sell in a timely manner.

  • eBay - For smartphones and other electronics, eBay has an Instant Sale feature that estimates how much you can get on the site, which is handy. With Instant Sale, you can get an eBay voucher (rather than cash) right away from eBay. Not all devices are eligible for Instant Sale, so you may need to do a traditional listing and ship directly to a buyer. If you want cash, you can also do a standard listing.

  • Craigslist - Craigslist is designed to let you find buyers in your immediate area so you can cash for your devices quick. Setting up an in-person sale can be a hassle, and it will require meeting up with the potential buyer. Craigslist can let you sell your stuff without having to ship, and because it's a direct sale, you often get a lot more money than you do using a trade-in site.

  • Swappa - Swappa is basically like eBay, in that you can list your device for sale and sell it directly to a person to make more money than you'll get selling to a trade-in site. To sell on Swappa, your devices need to be fully functional, ready to activate (not locked or blacklisted) and without any cracks.

Sample Price Comparisons


Below, we priced out two devices. A newer iPhone and an older iPad to give you an idea of the differences you'll see on different trade-in sites. Remember, every device is going to vary in price from site to site, so it's best to shop around. Prices can even vary day to day, and we didn't always get the same price checking a few days after getting a price quote.

A 64GB iPhone X in silver color from Verizon in good or excellent condition, equating to no damage but some minor scratches from general use.

  • MacRumors - $390

  • Amazon - $357

  • Target - $330

  • Best Buy - $360

  • Verizon - $370

  • Gazelle - $352

  • It's Worth More - $516

  • BuyBackWorld - $480

  • Decluttr - $517

  • Apple - $500

  • Craigslist - ~$600

  • Swappa - ~$600

  • eBay - ~$550


A 32GB Wi-Fi only iPad mini 2 in good or excellent condition, equating to no damage but some minor scratches from general use.

  • MacRumors - $35

  • Amazon - $55

  • Target - $59

  • Best Buy - $70

  • Verizon - $45

  • Gazelle - $48

  • It's Worth More - $65

  • BuyBackWorld - $70

  • Decluttr - $63

  • Apple - $76

  • Craigslist - $75 - $100

  • Swappa - ~$100

  • eBay - ~$100


How to Get Your Device Ready to Sell or Trade-in


You're going to want to erase your iPhone, iPad, or Mac before you trade it in to make sure your personal data is gone and safe, and you'll also need to disable Find My iPhone and remove it from your iCloud account to make sure it's no longer Activation Locked.

Bottom Line


If you're selling an Apple device to buy another Apple device, going with Apple's trade-in program is a good idea. Apple sends you a box to make it easy, provides decent prices that beat out many other trade-in sites, and gives you an Apple gift card to put towards another Apple purchase.

If you want cash and convenience, a site like Gazelle or Decluttr is worth checking out, but if you want the absolute most money, use eBay, Swappa, or Craigslist to sell a device directly to a person.

When you need to buy a new phone from a carrier, many carrier trade-in programs could be worth checking out just for the convenience, but no carrier or big box retailer is going to offer the best prices.

Guide Feedback


Know of a great trade-in option we left out or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.


This article, "Apple Trade-In Guide: Getting the Most Money Back" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Everything You Need to Know About HomeKit

The HomeKit ecosystem may seem daunting and confusing if you're unfamiliar with smart home products, their functionality, and their benefits, but getting started is actually simple and straightforward.

Learning the ins and outs of HomeKit after setup does take a bit of effort, but it's not a difficult process and having interlinked electronics that can interact with each other and be automated can save time and really streamline your life.



What is HomeKit?


HomeKit is Apple's smart home platform, which is designed to let you control various internet-connected home devices -- ranging from thermostats and plugs to window blinds, light bulbs, and more -- with Apple devices.

These days, more and more products are internet connected, which is why you've heard the phrase "Internet of Things."

The Internet of Things is a confusing mix of "smart" products that connect to the internet and can be controlled by a range of different platforms, from Amazon's Alexa to Google Home to Samsung SmartThings.

HomeKit is Apple's "Internet of Things" solution that connects HomeKit-enabled smart accessories together in a way that lets you operate them using your Apple products.

What You Can Do With HomeKit


HomeKit isn't a product or software, it's a framework that links smart home products together and adds new capabilities to devices like lights, locks, cameras, thermostats, plugs, and more.

HomeKit lets you control smart home products using apps on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac, or simple Siri voice commands.

While controlling smart home products with Siri or with an iPhone is convenient, the real magic of HomeKit comes when you have multiple HomeKit-enabled products because you can control them all at once using scenes or set up automations so that they activate automatically.


You can, for example, create a "Good night" scene that makes sure the doors are locked, closes the garage, turns off the lights, lowers the thermostat, and then activates a night light whenever motion is detected. With automation, you can set individual HomeKit devices to come on or off at specific times, or you can set entire scenes, like the aforementioned "Good night" scene to come on at a set time.


HomeKit setups, scenes, and automations can be as complex or as simple as you like, and now that HomeKit is in its fifth year of availability, there are all kinds of HomeKit products you can purchase. With a bit of time and some money, you can have a whole smart home ecosystem that's streamlined, automated, and easy to control.

Setting It Up


Getting started with HomeKit is as simple as purchasing a HomeKit-enabled device, whether it be a smart plug, light bulb, AirPlay 2 speaker, Apple TV, HomePod, thermostat, or something else.

From there, open up the "Home" app, which comes pre-installed on all iOS devices. Tap on the "Add Accessory" button that's on the main screen of the Home app, and then follow the steps after it opens up to the rear camera.

All HomeKit products come with a HomeKit QR code on them, which you need to scan with the camera. Scanning the HomeKit code adds a device to the HomeKit framework, and then you can follow a few additional steps to assign it to a room, a necessary step for organizing your HomeKit devices.

Types of HomeKit Devices


There are all kinds of HomeKit devices on the market, some that are more capable than others. The following HomeKit categories are available:

  • Lights

  • Switches

  • Outlets

  • Thermostats

  • Window Blinds

  • Fans

  • Air Conditioners

  • Humidifiers

  • Air Purifiers

  • Sensors

  • Locks

  • Cameras

  • Doorbells

  • Garage Doors

  • Sprinklers

  • Speakers

  • Receivers

  • TVs
Apple maintains a full list of HomeKit-compatible devices on its website, complete with links, so this is the best place to get an overview of all of the different HomeKit devices that you can put in your home.


Smart home devices that are compatible with HomeKit will have "Works with Apple Homekit" labeling on the packaging to make it clear that they support HomeKit.

Basic HomeKit Setup Tutorials


Using the Home App


Setting Up Remote Access


HomePod and AirPlay 2


HomeKit Requirements


Using HomeKit requires an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running the latest version of iOS, along with at least one HomeKit-enabled device.

Using the Home app on the Mac requires macOS Mojave, and to control devices when away from home, an Apple TV, iPad, or HomePod is required to serve as a Home Hub.

Ways to Control Your HomeKit Devices


The great thing about HomeKit is the myriad ways that you can control your HomeKit compatible devices.

You can use Siri voice commands on the iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac, Apple Watch, HomePod, or Apple TV to ask Siri to complete HomeKit tasks.

Devices can be controlled manually in the Home app, or in the app that comes with the device. Each HomeKit device will have an app downloadable from the iOS App Store that offers a way to control it.

You can also purchase HomeKit-enabled button-type devices that serve as remotes to activate HomeKit scenes physically, and there are switches for controlling HomeKit products such as lights.

Reviews of HomeKit Accessories


Lights


Sensors


Buttons/Remotes/Switches


Locks


Cameras


Thermostats


Plugs and Outlets


Miscellaneous



Security and Privacy


Security and privacy are topics that Apple takes seriously, and thus every manufacturer that creates a HomeKit-compatible device has to follow Apple's security guidelines, better ensuring your devices are safe from hackers.

Apple's commitment to privacy and demand that HomeKit products be secure is reassuring at a time when our homes are filled with smart devices that can hear us and see us.

For a long time, Apple required all HomeKit products to include a hardware-based HomeKit authentication coprocessor for HomeKit certification, and many HomeKit devices continue to offer this. In 2017, Apple began allowing manufacturers to obtain HomeKit certification with software-based authentication, but HomeKit is no less secure as a result.

All HomeKit devices use the same security features, including end-to-end encryption, non-reusable encryption keys, and two-way authentication (Apple verifies your HomeKit device and your HomeKit device verifies your Apple device) when connecting to a HomeKit setup.

A HomeKit camera, for example, sends video and audio streams directly to an iOS device and those streams are encrypted using randomly generated keys to prevent someone from intercepting your video feed.

All HomeKit data stored on your devices is fully encrypted, and HomeKit syncing between devices is done via iCloud and iCloud Keychain, both of which have their own security. Apple also must approve each and every device that gets the HomeKit labeling. In a nutshell, Apple has worked to make HomeKit a secure smart home platform that people can trust.

HomeKit is not without its bugs, though, and there have been some security snafus. In December 2017, there was a bug that left HomeKit accessories vulnerable to unauthorized access, but Apple was quick to fix it.

For those interested, the nitty gritty details about HomeKit security are available in Apple's iOS Security Guide and are well worth checking out if you have security concerns about using smart home devices. [PDF]

Solving HomeKit Connectivity Problems


When using HomeKit devices, you might sometimes see an error that a device is unreachable in the Home app or have other problems connecting to a HomeKit product.

The Home app, and most HomeKit apps that accompany HomeKit products, provide very little info on why a HomeKit product isn't working properly or connecting to your network, which can make troubleshooting HomeKit issues frustrating.

There are a few basic steps you can follow that will sometimes solve connectivity issues.

  1. Make sure the HomeKit device has power, is turned on, and is in range of your router if it's a Wi-Fi device.

  2. Turn the HomeKit device off, wait a good 10 seconds, and turn it back off. Do the same thing with your iPhone or other device you're attempting to use with HomeKit.

  3. Check the Wi-Fi connection and reset your router. Make sure your iOS device is up to date, connected to the internet, and that you're signed into iCloud.

  4. Make sure your HomeKit device is on the right Wi-Fi band. There are a lot of HomeKit devices that are 2.4GHz while most devices connect to 5GHz networks, and that can sometimes cause problems. If you have a 2.4GHz accessory, make sure it's on the 2.4GHz network. Steps for this will vary based on your setup.

  5. Remove the device from HomeKit in the Home app and then re-add it by scanning it. For some HomeKit products, this is probably a last resort step because it eliminates scenes and automations.

  6. Remove the device from HomeKit and reset it. This is a step that's necessary when removing some HomeKit devices from a HomeKit setup. You're going to need to consult the manual of your device because resetting is different on every product.

If none of these steps work, you're going to want to contact the support staff for whichever product you're having problems with to get further information on what to do for troubleshooting purposes.

Many HomeKit manufacturers have online troubleshooting databases, so in some cases, you can just Google for a solution.

There are more drastic steps to take, such as logging in and out of iCloud or resetting your entire HomeKit setup, but we recommend contacting a manufacturer before trying these last resort options just because of the hassle involved.

Discuss HomeKit


Have a setup question or a HomeKit issue you just can't figure out? You might want to check out the HomeKit forums on the MacRumors site for additional help. There are quite a few HomeKit users on the forums, and most people are happy to help.

Guide Feedback


Want to offer feedback on this guide, ask for feature additions, or point out an error? Send us an email here.


This article, "Everything You Need to Know About HomeKit" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Powerbeats Pro: Apple’s Sporty AirPods Alternative

Apple's Beats brand in April unveiled the Powerbeats Pro, a redesigned wire-free version of its popular fitness-oriented Powerbeats earbuds. Like the AirPods, Powerbeats Pro come with a dedicated charging case that offers 24 hour battery life and an H1 chip for fast connectivity to your devices and Hey Siri support.

Our Powerbeats Pro guide has all of the details you need to know about Apple's newest earbuds, which are a highly appealing alternative to the AirPods.


Design and Fit


The Powerbeats Pro feature a design that's similar to prior Powerbeats models, but Apple says they've been entirely overhauled for an ideal wireless fit.

Apple aimed for the best possible fit for most people, testing more than 20 configurations before arriving at the final design. Apple says the Powerbeats Pro use a new "ergonomically angled acoustic housing" that fits comfortably in the concha bowl of the ear.


Apple designed the Powerbeats Pro to be 23 percent smaller and 17 percent lighter than the previous-generation Powerbeats 3 earbuds.

Like prior Powerbeats models, the Powerbeats Pro feature earhooks that fit over the ears to keep them in place. Apple says the earhook is adjustable, and the Powerbeats themselves can be customized with four sizes of ear tips.


The Powerbeats Pro are designed to create a tight fit in the ear to isolate sound, and there's no ambient noise mode, which is something to keep in mind.

Powerbeats Pro come with a clamshell-style charging case that's available in black. Like the AirPods charging case, it uses a magnetic closure to keep your Powerbeats Pro safe when not in use.

Sound


According to Apple, sound was its "highest priority" when developing the Powerbeats Pro. The earbuds were reengineered "from the inside out" to add an upgraded linear piston driver that leverages pressurized airflow to create a "powerful acoustic response" in a small package.


Apple says Powerbeats Pro users will get "incredibly low sound distortion" and "great dynamic range" across the entire frequency curve.

Water Resistance


Apple says the Powerbeats Pro are sweat and water resistant, making them ideal for working out and other fitness activities. Apple told The Verge that the Powerbeats Pro have been engineered to handle "all of your sweat without fail."


Battery Life


Each Powerbeats Pro earbud features nine hours of listening time, which can be extended to more than 24 hours with the included charging case. At nine hours of listening time, the Powerbeats Pro offer a longer battery life than the AirPods 2.

A Fast Fuel feature lets you get 1.5 hours of music playback after five minutes of charging, and 4.5 hours of playback after 15 minutes of charging.


The Powerbeats Pro come on when taken out of the charging case and power off when they're placed inside. A motion accelerometer is included to detect when the earbuds are idle, putting them into sleep mode to conserve battery life.


The charging case itself does not support wireless charging so you will need to charge it up with a Lightning cable through the included Lightning port.


Physical Buttons


There are physical volume and track controls on each of the Powerbeats Pro earbuds, so you can control volume and skip tracks on the earbuds themselves.


There's also a button for answering and declining incoming phone calls.

Sensors and H1 Chip


The same H1 chip that's in the second-generation AirPods is in the Powerbeats Pro, allowing for fast connections to your devices and faster switching. The H1 chip also enables "Hey Siri" functionality, allowing for hands-free access to Apple's personal assistant.


There are optical sensors in the Powerbeats Pro that allow the earbuds to detect when they're in your ears, playing and pausing music appropriately.

Phone Calls


There's a speech-detecting accelerometer in the Powerbeats Pro, along with two beam-forming microphones on each side that are designed to filter out external sound so incoming phone calls sound crisp and clear.

Connectivity


Along with an H1 chip for "Hey Siri" support and quick connections to your devices, the Powerbeats Pro use Class 1 Bluetooth technology for extended range and "exceptional cross-body performance."

As with the AirPods, you can use both Powerbeats Pro earbuds at once or choose to use just one.


Powerbeats Pro connect to your iPhone or Mac just like AirPods. Simply open the case to prompt a pairing mode, and Powerbeats Pro will pair automatically with any supported devices signed into your iCloud account. This feature requires an iCloud account and macOS 10.14.4, iOS 12.2, and watchOS 5.2 or later.

Compatibility


Full functionality, such as quick device connections and Hey Siri support will require an iOS device, but Apple says the Powerbeats Pro will also work fine with Android devices.

Colors


The AirPods are only available in white, but Apple is making the Powerbeats Pro available in Black, Ivory, Moss, and Navy.


Price


Powerbeats Pro are priced at $249.95 in the United States, which is $50 more than the AirPods 2 with wireless charging case and $50 more than the wired Powerbeats 3.

Launch Date


Apple plans to launch the Powerbeats Pro in May with the earbuds set to be available from the Apple online store and Apple retail stores.

Powerbeats Pro will launch in the United States and in 20 other countries and regions, including Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Lichtenstein, Luxembourg, Macau, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK.

Powerbeats Pro will expand to additional countries and regions in the summer and fall of 2019.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about the Powerbeats Pro or know of details we've left out? Let us know in the comments or Send us an email here.


This article, "Powerbeats Pro: Apple's Sporty AirPods Alternative" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Best Alternatives to Apple’s Now-Canceled AirPower

Apple on Friday made the unprecedented move of canceling work on the AirPower, the wireless charging mat that was supposed to charge the Apple Watch, iPhone, and AirPods all at once.

There are already a number of AirPower-like alternative products on the market, and we're likely going to be seeing additional replacements in the future. None of these accessories do exactly what the AirPower promised because there are dedicated spots to charge each device, but each option will charge more than one device at one time.


1. Nomad Base Station Apple Watch Edition ($139) - Nomad's Apple Watch Base Station has an Apple Watch charging puck for charging the Apple Watch, along with a double coil Qi wireless charging pad. You can use the wireless charging pad to charge the iPhone horizontally, but if you put the iPhone vertically, it frees up a little spot for charging the AirPods, so all three devices charge at one time. We reviewed the Nomad Base Station and liked it quite a lot, though it is quite expensive.


2. Belkin Boost Up Wireless Charging Dock ($127) - This is another expensive dock, but it's another that we reviewed and liked quite a lot. Belkin's Boost Up Wireless Charging Dock has an upright charging space for wirelessly charging an iPhone and a space for the Apple Watch, but this isn't a dock suitable for the AirPods. Still, it's a good option for dual device charging.


3. SliceCharge 2 Wireless Charging Mat ($60) - The SliceCharge 2 has an Apple Watch charging puck in the middle and two wireless charging coils at the sides, so you can either charge two iPhones or an iPhone and an AirPods 2 Wireless Charging Case. It's affordable, slim, and supports 7.5W wireless charging for the iPhone.


4. ZENS Dual + Watch Wireless Charger (99 euros) - The Dual + Watch Wireless Charger from European company ZENS is another option that we recently reviewed and were impressed with. It has a stand for charging an Apple Watch, along with a base that can wirelessly charge two iPhones at one time. It's 99 euros which is pricy, but ZENS does ship worldwide. This dock is temporarily out of stock, but it's coming back in May.


5. NytStnd AirPods Trio ($109) - The Nytstnd will charge your AirPods, Apple Watch, and iPhone all at once, but there's a catch - there's no wireless charging for AirPods. The Apple Watch charges via a standard Apple Watch charging puck (that you supply), while there's a wireless charging pad for iPhone, a Lightning port for AirPods, and one extra Lighting port. On the plus side, you can charge all three items at once and there's also an extra spot for storing keys or other odds and ends. You also don't need the new AirPods 2 with Wireless Charging Case to use it.


6. Unravel Wireless Charger ($99) - This interesting little charger features three charging stations, one for AirPods, one for Apple Watch, and one for iPhone. You can lay them flat or roll them up in a configuration that works for you if you only need to charge two devices at once. We haven't tried this, but it's a neat design and the reviews look to be largely positive.


Affordable AirPower Alternatives From Amazon


If you go to Amazon and type in "AirPower" or "Wireless Charging Station" you'll see a whole slew of cheap wireless chargers that promise to charge your Apple Watch, iPhone, and AirPods all at once. We haven't tested any of these options and can't verify whether they work, and at these price points, there's no way they're using Apple-certified components.


Still, if you're looking for an alternative to the AirPower that's super affordable, these might be what you want. We'll list some of the options that are getting better ratings below.

  • Conido Wireless Charging Station ($42) - This charging station has an upright charger for the iPhone, an Apple Watch charging puck with stand, and a slot for charging the AirPods, but with Lightning instead of wirelessly.


  • OLEBR Charging Stand ($39) - The OLEBR is similar to the Conido, but it uses Lightning for the iPhone and the AirPods while offering a charging puck for the Apple Watch. So this one isn't wireless at all, but still charges multiple devices at once.


  • MQOUNY Wireless Charger 3-in-1 ($39) - This stand is rather compact, offering an upright wireless charger for the iPhone, an Apple Watch charging puck, and above that, a holder for the AirPods that charges them over Lightning.


  • Bestand 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Stand ($48) - This wireless charging stand has an upright wireless charger for the iPhone, a charging arm for the Apple Watch, and a Lightning connector for charging the AirPods.


  • IBIS 9W Dual Wireless Fast Charging Station 3 ($40) - There's no space for the Apple Watch on this one, but it will charge your iPhones and your AirPods with Wireless Charging Case.


More Charging Options


The iPhone and the AirPods Wireless Charging Case will work with any Qi-based wireless charger on the market, so there are an endless number of single device wireless chargers you can get as well.

Feedback


Have a favorite AirPower alternative that we didn't list here? Let us know in the comments.


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Apple TV+ Guide: Everything We Know So Far

Apple is working on dozens of original TV shows and movies with high-profile directors, producers, and actors, with all of that content set to be available through a new Apple TV+ app that's going to be released this fall.

In the guide below, we've rounded up everything that we know about Apple's new streaming TV service.


What is Apple TV+?


Apple TV+ is the name of Apple's new television service that will be home to the original TV shows and movies that are funded by Apple. There are more than 30 in the works, with a list available in our dedicated Apple TV show guide.

Apple is aiming to compete with existing streaming services like Hulu, Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, HBO, Showtime, and others with its original content and has brought on huge names ranging from Steven Spielberg and J.J. Abrams to Oprah.


Well-known actors and actresses like Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon, and Steve Carell are involved in Apple's upcoming TV shows.

What's Apple's goal with original content?


Apple says that it wants to make Apple TV+ the home for the "world's most creative storytellers," providing funding and a platform for TV shows, movies, and documentaries with "inspiriting and authentic stories with emotional depth and compelling characters."

Apple wants Apple TV+ to offer the "highest quality" original storytelling available.

Are there ads?


Nope. Apple says that Apple TV+ will be ad-free and available to watch on demand.

What's the price?


Apple hasn't announced pricing for Apple TV+ yet, but if the company wants to be competitive with Hulu, Netflix, HBO, and other streaming services, it will need to be priced in the range of $10 to $15.

There were rumors suggesting Apple was going to make its original content available for free, but it doesn't look like that's happening.

When's it coming?


Apple says that Apple TV+ will launch this fall, which is presumably when enough of its TV shows will be done filming to make it worthwhile. Much of the content is still in development.

How do I watch?


Apple TV+ will be built into the Apple TV app, which is being overhauled this May. The new Apple TV app will provide access to Apple TV+ content right alongside content from third-party providers, with new machine learning and AI techniques used to recommend content that's perfect for you.

What's the difference between Apple TV+ and Channels?


The revamped TV app will also include "Channels," which are will let you subscribe to and watch services like HBO, Starz, SHOWTIME, CBS All Access, Smithsonian Channel, EPIX, Tastemade, Noggin, and MTV Hits, right in the TV app without needing to open a different app. Channels are completely separate from Apple TV+, which can be thought of as Apple's own channel.

Along with Channels and Apple TV+, the Apple TV app will make recommendations and suggestions for shows and movies from iTunes and more than 150 streaming apps and cable services like Canal+, Charter Spectrum, DIRECTV NOW and PlayStation Vue, though content that is not Apple's own and not included in a channel will need to be watched in a third-party app just like the original TV app.

Where will Apple TV+ be available?


Apple's revamped TV app is coming to more than 100 countries this May, and because Apple TV+ features only Apple's own content, it will be able to be released worldwide wherever the TV app is available.


Apple TV+ content will not be available outside of the TV app.

What devices will support Apple TV+?


Apple TV+ will work wherever the TV app is available, which includes iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple TV, along with the Mac. There's no TV app for Mac right now, but Apple plans to introduce one this summer.

Apple is also expanding its TV app to Samsung Smart TVs in the spring, and Sony, Vizio, and LG TVs later in the year. The TV app is also coming to Amazon Fire TV and Roku.

Guide Feedback


See something we left out of our Apple TV+ guide or have a question not answered here? Let us know in the comments or Send us an email here.


This article, "Apple TV+ Guide: Everything We Know So Far" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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