Apple Leaks Video of macOS 10.14 Showing Xcode 10 With Dark Mode, News App, and More

Steven Troughton-Smith today discovered a brief video on Apple's servers that appears to show Xcode 10 running on macOS 10.14.


The well-known developer says he found the 30-second clip buried within an API on the backend of the Mac App Store. He shared a direct link to the video, embedded below, with 9to5Mac's Guilherme Rambo.


Given the video originates from Apple's servers, and is for its own Xcode development tool, everything shown is very likely real.


That includes:
  • Xcode 10 has a new dark interface, while the Trash icon in the dock is also darker, suggesting that macOS 10.14 may feature a systemwide dark mode, including in apps. On macOS 10.13, there is a partial dark mode, but only for the dock and top menu bar.
  • There is an Apple News icon in the dock, suggesting that it will be expanding to the Mac with a desktop app.
  • The desktop background could be a picture of the Mojave Desert in California during the night, hinting at a macOS Mojave name for the next version. MacRumors recently noted that Mojave could be Apple's top choice based on the company's recent trademark activity.
The video itself also likely confirms rumors that the Mac App Store will be redesigned on macOS 10.14 to more closely resemble the App Store on iOS 11, including the addition of preview videos like this one for apps.

The leak comes just two days before Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference, where the company is expected to preview macOS 10.14 alongside iOS 12, watchOS 5, and tvOS 12. WWDC opens with a keynote on Monday at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California.

MacRumors will be in attendance at the keynote, with live coverage of the event beginning shortly after 8:00 a.m. Pacific Time. Stay tuned to MacRumors.com and our @MacRumorsLive account on Twitter.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.14

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Recent Trademark Filings Hint at Possible Names for macOS 10.14 – Mojave, Sequoia, Ventura or Sonoma

A series of trademark applications Apple filed in Cambodia and the Philippines may point towards the name we can expect to see used for macOS 10.14, the next-generation version of macOS that Apple will unveil at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June.

In the two countries, using a presumed shell company, Apple has filed several new trademarks on a series of California landmark names that originally surfaced in 2014. In the Philippines, Apple has filed trademark applications for Mojave, Sequoia, Sonoma, and Ventura, while in Cambodia, Apple has filed a trademark for Mojave alone.


It is not clear why Apple is filing new trademarks for these names in these specific countries, but these new filings suggest one of these four names could be used for macOS 10.14. Given that Mojave is the name that was filed in both locations, it could be Apple's frontrunner.

Other California landmark names that were trademarked alongside these back in 2014 have not seen any new trademark filings by Apple, with trademarking activity limited to Mojave, Sequoia, Sonoma, and Ventura.

The Ipanah Valley in the Mojave Desert, via the National Park Service

With trademark filings, Apple is required to continually file extensions to hold on to a name because trademarks must be used. Apple has kept several of the names from its original 2014 filing active, including Rincon, Grizzly, Farallon, and Monterey. All of these names could also be used for future versions of macOS. Mojave, Sequoia, Sonoma, and Ventura are the only four names where Apple has filed new applications, however.

Other names from 2014 have been abandoned by Apple and are likely out of the running as future macOS titles. Diablo, for example, was marked abandoned by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in October of 2015, and Apple failed to renew several other names last fall that were marked abandoned this spring, including Redwood, Big Sur, Pacific, Miramar, Redtail, Condor, Tiburon, and Shasta. An additional two names, Mammoth and California, are suspended.

For the last several years, Apple has been using names related to the Sierra Mountains. We've had macOS 10.10 Yosemite, macOS 10.11 El Capitan, macOS 10.12 Sierra, and macOS 10.13 High Sierra, and with few other available names in that vein, Apple may be planning to move on to a new location at this time. California landmarks have been Apple's naming scheme of choice since the release of OS X Mavericks in 2013.

Mojave is a desert in California, while Sonoma and Ventura are cities, one located in Northern California and popular as a wine country destination, while the other is Southern California and famous for its surfing spots. Sequoia is short for Sequoia National Park and is home to giant sequoia trees.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.14

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macOS 10.14 Wishlist: Features MacRumors Readers Hope to See in the Next Version of macOS

Apple is expected to preview the next-generation version of macOS, macOS 10.14, at the keynote event for the Worldwide Developers Conference, set to be held on June 4. Though the keynote is less than two weeks away, we've heard little about what we might expect to see in the new version of macOS aside from the possibility of cross-compatible Mac and iOS apps.

With so few rumors about macOS 10.14 available, we turned to the MacRumors community to ask our readers what they would like to see the most in the next version of macOS.



  • Unified macOS and iOS design - With rumors of apps compatible with both iOS devices and Macs, MacRumors reader Glmnet1 would also like to see a more unified design between Macs and iOS devices. What that might look like is unclear, and while it could happen at some point, it's not likely for this year as we're not expecting major design changes with iOS 12 or macOS 10.14.


  • Apple iOS apps for Mac - In the same vein, based on cross platform app rumors, several MacRumors readers would like to see iOS-exclusive apps like Apple News, Health, Activity, and Home made available on the Mac. A dedicated Apple Music app that's separate from iTunes is also on at least one reader's wishlist, as is an improved version of iTunes.


  • HomeKit - A way to control HomeKit devices on Mac is a highly requested feature, either through the aforementioned Home app for the Mac or through Siri. At the current time, while Siri is available on macOS, the personal assistant can't control HomeKit devices from the Mac.


  • Complications as Menu Bar items - Complications are limited to the Apple Watch, but since the device's debut, Apple Watch users have been hoping for their expansion to other platforms, including macOS and iOS. MacRumors reader ButteryScrollin would like Apple Watch-style complications to be added to the Mac's Menu Bar, introducing new quick-access shortcuts.


  • Split-Screen improvements - MacRumors reader bmac89 would like some iPad-like improvements to the Mac's split-screen functionality, with options for dragging to resize or dismiss a split-screen view, opening apps into a split-screen view from the Dock or Spotlight, and initiating split-screen in the same way.


  • APFS improvements - With macOS High Sierra, Apple introduced a new Apple Filesystem. The rollout of APFS was something of a nightmare for Apple customers who have Fusion drives that combine SSDs with traditional hard drives, and to this day, Apple has not implemented APFS support for Fusion drives. MacRumors reader Ncrypt would also like to see Apple use APFS to allow for macOS updates to install in the background to cut down on installation times.


  • Group FaceTime - Group FaceTime is on both the macOS 10.14 and iOS 12 wishlists, and while it's something Apple is rumored to be working on, it's not clear if this is a feature that's ready for debut.


As with iOS 12, many readers listed performance and stability improvements at the top of their wishlists for macOS 10.14, and it's likely this is on Apple's to-do list as well. Apple is rumored to have delayed some macOS 10.14 and iOS 12 features to 2019 in order to focus on internal improvements following a slew of high-profile bugs that have impacted iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra.

What new features are you hoping Apple adds to macOS 10.14? Let us know in the comments. Make sure you check out our macOS 10.14 roundup for more on what we might see in the update, including possible naming choices. We've also got a separate iOS 12 wishlist that has a list of what MacRumors readers are hoping will come to iOS in 2018.

Related Roundups: WWDC 2018, macOS 10.14

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Craig Federighi Says Apple Intends to Address APFS Support for Fusion Drives ‘Very Soon’

Apple is planning to share news on APFS support for Fusion Drives "very soon," Apple software engineering chief Craig Federighi told MacRumors reader Jonathan in an email this afternoon.

Federighi shared the detail after Jonathan sent him an email asking whether or not APFS was still in the works for Fusion Drives, which combine a hard drive with flash storage to provide the speed of an SSD with the affordability of a standard hard drive. Fusion Drives are used in iMacs and Mac mini machines.


In response to Jonathan's question, Federighi gave a short but enticing answer, which we verified:
Hi Jonathan,

We intend to address this question very soon...

Thanks,

- craig
With the launch of macOS High Sierra, Apple introduced a new Apple File System for Macs that have all-flash built-in storage. At the time macOS High Sierra was introduced, Apple said that the initial release of the software would not allow Fusion Drives to be converted to APFS, but confirmed APFS support would be coming at a later date.

Since then, iMac and Mac mini owners who have Fusion Drives have been eagerly waiting for Apple to implement support for the feature, but in update after update, no APFS support for Fusion Drives has materialized.

Federighi's statement suggests that APFS will be added as a feature in an upcoming software update, perhaps the macOS 10.14 update that's expected to be unveiled at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June.


For those unfamiliar with the new Apple File System, it's a more modern file system than HFS+ and has been optimized for solid state drives. It is safe and secure, offering crash protection, safe document saves, stable snapshots, simplified backups, strong native encryption, and more.

Related Roundup: macOS 10.14

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How to Remove Third-Party Accounts Like Facebook From Your Mac

With the release of iOS 11, Apple nixed its built-in integration with Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, and Vimeo, a feature that allowed iPhone and iPad users to store their third-party account information and access it within apps that needed to use those services.


Apple has yet to remove the equivalent feature from macOS, although this is likely to change in a future version. In the meantime, this article shows you how to manually remove third-party accounts like Facebook from your Mac, which some users may find a germane step in light of the recent data scandal.

Note that the following guide only deletes associated third-party accounts at the system level of your Mac – you'll still be able to access your Facebook account and related data by logging into Facebook.com (where you can delete your account permanently) or via the official iOS app, for example.
Continue reading "How to Remove Third-Party Accounts Like Facebook From Your Mac"

Gruber: Apple’s Cross-Platform App Support to Debut in 2019, Not 2018

Rumored cross-platform functionality that will allow Macs to run iPhone and iPad apps is planned for macOS 10.15 and iOS 13 rather than macOS 10.14 and iOS 12, according to well-known Apple journalist John Gruber.

Gruber shared the tidbit in a blog post covering "scuttlebutt" he's heard about the cross-platform UI project, which he says is indeed in the works at Apple.


News of support for universal apps able to run on iPhone, iPad, and Mac was first shared by Bloomberg's Mark Gurman in December. At the time, Gurman said Apple would introduce the functionality in iOS 12 and macOS 10.14, with an announcement likely to happen at the Worldwide Developer's Conference in June.

Gurman and Axios' Ina Fried later confirmed in January that the combined app framework was on the table for 2018 despite other planned iOS 12 and macOS 10.14 features being pushed back, but Gruber says he's "nearly certain" it's a 2019 project for macOS 10.15 and iOS 13, which could also be part of an updated UI for iOS said to be coming next year. "I would set your expectations accordingly for this year's WWDC," he writes.

According to Gruber, from what he's heard through first and second-hand sources, Apple appears to be working on declarative control APIs for iOS and macOS, which suggests Apple wants to make it easy for developers to create modern cross-platform user interfaces. Gruber's info is not as definitive as outright support for cross-platform iOS and macOS apps as has been previously reported, but it is an indication that Apple is working towards that goal.
There's nothing inherently cross-platform about a declarative control API. But it makes sense that if Apple believes that (a) iOS and MacOS should have declarative control APIs, and (b) they should address the problem of abstracting the API differences between UIKit (iOS) and AppKit (MacOS), that they would tackle them at the same time. Or perhaps the logic is simply that if they're going to create a cross-platform UI framework, the basis for that framework should be a declarative user interface.
It's not clear who is correct on the timing of the universal app project given the conflicting information, but we don't have long to wait to find out. macOS 10.14 and iOS 12 will be introduced at the keynote event of the Worldwide Developers Conference, which is set to take place on June 4.

Gruber's full writeup with additional details on the project can be found over at Daring Fireball.

Related Roundups: WWDC 2018, macOS 10.14, iOS 12

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Mac Desktop Extension Software Duet Display Rendered Inoperable in macOS 10.13.4

Users of popular Mac desktop extension app Duet Display are being advised not to update to macOS 10.13.4, due to "critical bugs" that prevent the software from communicating with connected iOS devices used as extra displays.

When installed on a Mac and an iPad (or iPhone) and the two devices are connected using a Lightning cable or 30-pin connector, Duet allows users to extend their macOS desktop space on the Retina display of the iOS device. However, unspecified changes in the latest update to macOS High Sierra, released by Apple yesterday, causes the Duet client app to hang, and users are being advised to hold back from upgrading, at least for now.


The critical issue was highlighted by Duet's ex-Apple developers in a blog post on the Duet support site, quoted from below.
Unfortunately, the upcoming version of macOS has several critical bugs that make it impossible for Duet to work properly. We have alerted Apple to their issue, but we have not received a concrete timeline on a fix. These features continue to work as expected in 10.13.3.
Duet's developers are recommending that users contact Apple through the company's online bug reporting form to get the issue prioritized. In the meantime, the developers are "actively looking" into workarounds to reinstate Duet's functionality in macOS 10.13.4.

Duet Display is priced at $19.99 in the App Store, and unlocking the Pro features to turn the iPad Pro into a drawing tablet costs an additional $19.99 per year through an in-app subscription. Duet Display is available from the App Store. [Direct Link]

Related Roundup: macOS 10.14

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Apple Still Expected to Allow iPhone and iPad Apps to Run on Macs Later This Year

While multiple reports suggest Apple has decided to place a greater focus on improving the performance and security of iOS and macOS, which will delay some new features until next year, it appears the company still aims to introduce the ability for Macs to run iPhone and iPad apps later this year.


Mark Gurman and Ina Fried, reporting for Bloomberg News and Axios respectively, both claim the framework for combined apps remains on Apple's software roadmap for 2018, despite some planned iOS 12 features likely being pushed back to 2019, including a new home screen with a redesigned grid of app icons.

Apple's software engineering chief Craig Federighi reportedly revealed the plans during a meeting with employees earlier this month.

Last month, Gurman reported that developers will be able to design a single third-party app that works with both a touchscreen, and a mouse or trackpad, depending on whether it's running on an iPhone, iPad, or Mac. Apple would presumably also streamline its own apps on the desktop and mobile.

The report didn't explain how all of this will work, but Apple could be planning to release a new SDK with new APIs that enable true cross-platform functionality. Right now, Apple's UIKit and AppKit frameworks provide the required infrastructure for iOS and macOS app user interfaces respectively.

It's worth noting that Apple already has a private framework called UXKit, used for the Photos app on Mac. In 2015, Jason Snell said UXKit "sits above the Mac's familiar AppKit frameworks and strongly resembles UIKit on iOS."

Apple tentatively plans to begin rolling out the change in iOS 12 and macOS 10.14, so there will likely be an announcement at WWDC 2018 around June. Following a few months of beta testing, major new versions of iOS and macOS are typically publicly released in September and October respectively.

The project is reportedly codenamed "Marzipan" within Apple. Gurman speculated that universal apps would make it easier for Apple to one day create a single operating system for all of its devices, should it ever go down that avenue. At the very least, it could bring some renewed attention to Mac apps.

Apple would be following in the footsteps of Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform, aimed at helping developers create universal apps that run across Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile, the latter of which is being phased out.

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Apple Plans to Let Developers Release Universal Apps That Work Across iPhone, iPad, and Mac

Apple aims to allow developers to release universal apps that work across iPhone, iPad, and Mac as early as next year, according to Bloomberg News.

Starting as early as next year, software developers will be able to design a single application that works with a touchscreen or mouse and trackpad depending on whether it’s running on the iPhone and iPad operating system or on Mac hardware, according to people familiar with the matter.
Apple tentatively plans to begin rolling out the change in iOS 12 and macOS 10.14 next year, and it could announce the news as soon as WWDC 2018 in June, according to the report. The exact timeline is subject to change.

Apple currently requires developers to design separate apps for iOS and macOS, but Mac apps often receive less attention than their iPhone and iPad counterparts. It's unknown if Apple will go one step further and eventually merge the less-popular Mac App Store with the App Store for iPhone and iPad.

The project is reportedly codenamed "Marzipan" and is considered to be one of the biggest changes on Apple's roadmap next year. The report speculates that universal apps would make it easier for Apple to one day create a single operating system for all of its devices, should it ever go down that avenue.

Apple would be following in the footsteps of Microsoft's Universal Windows Platform, aimed at helping developers create universal apps that run across Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile, the latter of which is being phased out.


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