Hands-On With LG’s Latest UltraFine 4K Display With Thunderbolt 3 Support

LG recently debuted a new 32UL950 32-inch UltraFine 4K display, but this latest model, priced at $1300, wasn't designed in partnership with Apple.

It still shares quite a few design similarities with prior UltraFine models, though, so we thought we'd check it out in our latest YouTube video to see whether it's a solid option for the purchase price.

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The LG 32UL950 UltraFine Display features a black front panel with slim bezels and a curved base with a plastic monitor arm. It's tilt and height adjustable, so you can get it into the perfect position, and it can even be used in portrait orientation.


As with many LG displays, it's VESA compatible so you can mount it on the wall to save desk space. It is equipped with two USB-C Thunderbolt 3 ports, which can be used for fast data transfer, 60W charging for your MacBook, and daisychaining an additional 4K monitor if desired. There are also two USB-A ports, a DisplayPort, an HDMI port, a 3.5mm headphone jack, and built-in speakers.


The 4K display of the LG 32UL950 UltraFine is great, with crisp, detailed images and sharp text, though it's not quite as nice as the 5K UltraFine that LG offers in partnership with Apple.

This is a 32-inch display, but it's not ultrawide, and it has a resolution of 3840 x 2160 at 60Hz. Running this display at full resolution makes the on-screen elements quite small, so buyers might want to use it at 3360 x 1890 or 3200 x 1800 instead. Other display features include HDR and DCI-P3 support for excellent contrast and color.


For content creation or digital media, the LG 32UL950 is a solid choice, but it's not the greatest for gaming because it maxes out at 60Hz. It does support Radeon FreeSync and Dynamic Action Sync, though.

LG charges $1300 for the display, but it's available on Amazon at a cheaper price of $1100. That still makes it more expensive than LG's 5K monitor, so it's not going to be for everyone.

Make sure to watch our video up above for a closer look at LG's new UltraFine display, and let us know what you think of it in the comments below.


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Apple Secures Rights to AirPower Trademark Amid Launch Rumors

Amid launch rumors that Apple is preparing to release the AirPower sometime soon, the Cupertino company has finally secured the rights to the AirPower trademark.

To get the AirPower trademark, Apple had to jump through quite a few hoops over the course of the last few months, ultimately seeming to purchase access from a company that had previously applied for the trademark.


Apple first attempted to trademark the AirPower name in the summer of 2018, but found that a company named Advanced Access Technologies had filed an earlier application to trademark the term.

The AirPower trademark registered by Advanced Access Technologies was then provisionally granted and published for opposition in December 2018. Ahead of when a trademark is officially granted, the USPTO takes opposition filings from anyone who believes the trademark could result in confusion with an existing product.

Apple opposed Advanced Access Technologies' trademark of AirPower in January 2019, claiming that it would interfere with similar trademarked Apple product names, including AirPlay, AirPort, AirPods, and AirPrint.

After fighting to prevent the AirPower trademark from being granted to Advanced Access Technologies for several months with multiple different filings with the USPTO, Apple yesterday suddenly withdrew its opposition and the dispute was terminated.


Just after Apple withdrew opposition on Advanced Access Technologies' trademark of the AirPower name, an Apple lawyer was appointed the attorney of the trademark case, suggesting that Apple purchased rights to the AirPower trademark from Advanced Access Technologies ahead of an imminent AirPower launch that would not give Apple time to secure the trademark through other means.

Advanced Access Technologies is still listed as the owner of the trademark, but Apple appears to be in the process of getting that changed, with Apple lawyer Thomas Perle now named as the attorney on the trademark application.


Apple's acquisition of the AirPower trademark comes amid new rumors suggesting a launch for the long-delayed accessory isn't too far off. There's new code in the iOS 12.2 beta related to charging multiple devices at once, which wasn't there before, indicating Apple may be planning to release the AirPower sometime around when iOS 12.2 comes out.

The Wall Street Journal recently confirmed that Apple approved production of the AirPower earlier this year, and just today, we found an image of the AirPower with an iPhone XS and the new AirPods Wireless Charging Case hidden in the source code on Apple's website in Australia.

It's still not clear when the AirPower is actually going to launch, but with increasing signs of its arrival, it could come at any time. Apple this week released new iPads, iMacs, and updated AirPods on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, leading to speculation the company was gearing up to introduce the AirPower, but there's still no sign of the device.

We could potentially hear word on when we can expect the AirPower at Apple's March event, which will take place next Monday. Apple is using the event to introduce a new Apple News service and streaming TV service. Rumors have, however, suggested the event will not focus on hardware, so we could be waiting until later in the spring for an AirPower update.


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Apple Updates Final Cut Pro, Motion, Compressor, and iMovie

Apple today updated a number of its video-related Mac apps, including Final Cut Pro, Motion, Compressor, and iMovie. Most of the updates are minor in scale, focusing on bug fixes and under-the-hood performance improvements.

For all four apps, Apple has added a feature that detects media files that could be incompatible with future versions of macOS after Mojave. In Final Cut Pro and iMovie, these files will be converted to a compatible format, while just highlighted in Motion and Compressor.


Apple is phasing out support for 32-bit Mac apps after Mojave, which is why this new feature has been introduced. All three software updates also include improved reliability when sharing video to YouTube.

In Final Cut Pro, Apple has also added a number of bug fixes, with the release notes listed below:
- Detects media files that may be incompatible with future versions of macOS after Mojave and converts them to a compatible format
- Fixes an issue that could cause share destinations to disappear from the share menu after quitting Final Cut Pro
- Fixes an issue that could cause the workflow extension button to disappear when resizing the interface
- Fixes an issue in which the Select Clip command could incorrectly select the clip beneath the playhead
- Fixes an issue in which a successful share notification appears after the share operation was cancelled
- Fixes an issue in which frames saved to the frame browser in the Comparison Viewer may appear differently than they do in the viewer
- Fixes an issue in which frequency information for Hum Removal may not be visible in the audio inspector
- Fixes an issue in which relinked media may appear with black thumbnails in the browser and timeline
- Fixes an issue in which the share menu may be obscured behind the viewer when using Final Cut Pro in fullscreen mode
- Improves reliability when sharing video to YouTube
Final Cut Pro, Motion, Compressor, and iMovie are all available from the Mac App Store. iMovie is a free download, while Final Cut Pro is priced at $299, Motion is priced at $49.99, and Compressor is priced at $49.99.


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Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 78 With Bug Fixes and Performance Improvements

safaripreviewiconApple today released a new update for Safari Technology Preview, the experimental browser Apple first introduced three years ago in March 2016. Apple designed the Safari Technology Preview to test features that may be introduced into future release versions of Safari.

Safari Technology Preview release 78 includes bug fixes and performance improvements for Pointer Events, Web Inspector, WebDriver, Web API, Accessibility, and Media.

The new Safari Technology Preview update is available for both macOS High Sierra and macOS Mojave, the newest version of the Mac operating system that was released to the public in September 2018.

The Safari Technology Preview update is available through the Software Update mechanism in the Mac App Store to anyone who has downloaded the browser. Full release notes for the update are available on the Safari Technology Preview website.

Apple’s aim with Safari Technology Preview is to gather feedback from developers and users on its browser development process. Safari Technology Preview can run side-by-side with the existing Safari browser and while designed for developers, it does not require a developer account to download.


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Prototype Development Board of Original iPhone Surfaces in Never-Before-Seen Photos

The Verge has obtained never-before-seen photos of a development board for the original iPhone, providing an interesting look back at the measures Apple took to ensure the smartphone remained as much of a secret as possible.


The large circuit board contains nearly all of the original iPhone's components, including its processor, memory, storage, 30-pin dock connector, camera, home button, SIM card slot, and antennas for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. There are also some non-iPhone parts such as two Mini-USB connectors for accessing the baseband.

While this particular Engineering Validation Test (EVT) prototype has an iPhone display attached, the report notes that some boards were even supplied without the screen, meaning that many Apple engineers working on the original iPhone back in 2006-2007 had no idea what the handset would eventually look like.


The Verge's Tom Warren:
If an engineer inside Apple received a development board like this without a screen, component video and RCA connectors on the side of the board could be used to connect it to a display. Engineers could also test headphone connectivity, thanks to stereo line out ports on the side. Even the iPhone's main camera is mounted on the board for testing, and there's a giant space left to test the battery. If engineers didn't have a battery connected, a DC connector at the top can be used for external power. Apple also left room for what is marked as "prox flex" for proximity sensor testing.
Nowadays, Apple uses security shields for iPhone prototypes, but this early board is a fascinating look back at Apple's secrecy leading up to Steve Jobs' famous introduction of the iPhone. The full article is a worthwhile read.


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Apple’s Online Store Goes Down Amid New iMac and iPad Rumors

Apple's online store has gone down this morning. The company typically takes the site down pending changes to its product lineup, so we may well see new product announcements later today.


Apple has several rumored products debuting soon, including a new affordable iPad, iPad mini 5, next-generation AirPods, and its long-delayed AirPower wireless charging mat.

At least some of these product announcements were expected to be made via press release during the company's March 25 "It's Showtime" event, which will reportedly be service-focused, but Apple could feasibly announce new products sooner.

Indeed, well-connected Bloomberg journalist Mark Gurman recently suggested Apple could decide to announce new iMacs and iPads ahead of its upcoming media event in order to underline how much it intends to focus on news and video services.


We'll follow up on this development shortly when we learn more.


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Review: Fans of Classic Mac Designs Will Love the iBot G3

If you're a fan of classic Mac designs, you may be interested in the iBot G3, a figurine that's modeled after Apple's iconic iMac G3, first released in 1998.

The iBot G3 was designed by Philip Lee, who previously released another Mac-related figurine called the Classicbot. The iBot G3 is Lee's latest project, and like the Classic bot, it's a fun take on one of Apple's original Mac designs.


There are two variants of the iBot G3, one in Bondi Blue and one in Tangerine, both of which are two classic iMac G3 colors. The figures are made from plastic and are injection molded with details that closely mimic the design of the original iMac G3.


Injection molding allows for the smallest of components to be included, which means you get the classic iMac G3 design with translucent teardrop-shaped enclosure, carrying handle at the top, side hatch that gives a peek into the internal components, and even a tiny round mouse and matching keyboard.


It's so accurate to the original design that the inside components have also been separately created so you can see the machine's hardware through the translucent outer shell.


You can see the CRT tubes, the speakers on the front, the vents, the CD drive, the power button (and the power button on the tiny keyboard), all of the ports (hidden by an access panel complete with mouse cord cutout), and the spot where the power cable plugs in. The only thing missing is an Apple logo, as not including one prevents Lee from running into trademark issues. The Apple logos traditionally at the top and the back of the iMac G3 have been replaced with little bot logos.


The display of the iBot G3 features two little eyes, because it is, as the name suggests, an iMac that's been transformed into a robot. It has detachable legs and magnetic arms, and it is able to stand (or sit) on its own. You can remove the arms and the legs if desired, add an included stand, and set it up as a more traditional looking iMac with the keyboard and the mouse as accessories.


I like that the iBot G3 converts because it allows those who prefer the iMac robot look to use it their way, while others who would rather have a little iMac that looks more similar to the traditional design can disassemble it and display it that way. You can also combine the two, with a sitting or standing iBot G3 that also has the keyboard and mouse nearby.


Speaking of the keyboard and mouse, these two accessories are quite cute. The mouse is about the size of my fingernail and is an accurate miniature replica of the original round mouse that came with the iMac G3, while the keyboard features a translucent plastic housing with black keys.


The arms and legs of the iBot G3 are made from the same translucent plastic of the enclosure, so everything matches up well. The display is printed on, which is worth noting. I think it would have been neat if it had an actual electronic display, but that would have driven the cost up and been a lot more difficult to implement.

It would, however, be nice to be able to purchase an iBot with different eye expressions, and I would have preferred a lighter film because the the face of the iBot can be a bit hard to see sometimes depending on the lighting conditions of the room.


I don't have an iMac G3 to compare the iBot to, but I do have an iBook G3 that used the same design elements. It's in Blueberry, which is pretty similar to Bondi Blue (though a touch lighter) so it looks like the color of the Bondi Blue iBot G3 is close to accurate. The Tangerine color also looks quite similar to pictures of the Tangerine iMac G3.


The iBot G3 is not a toy and it is meant for displaying. It is not made of the sturdiest of plastics, and I would not be too rough with it. I did snap off the little hatch that lets you look inside on accident on one of the models, but it snapped right back in place. Still, I was worried about breaking it when trying to put it back together.


The magnetic connection between the arms is not particularly strong and there are a lot of small components, so this is not an ideal toy for a child. It would be easy to lose the pieces since many of the components are so tiny, and there is a warning on the website that the laminated cover of the display is prone to scratching. I didn't have any issues, but I was also careful with it.


$39 is a little expensive for an inanimate toy, but that's not unusual for figurines with this level of detail and it seems like a fair price given the attention put in to making the iBot G3 look like an iMac G3.

Bottom Line


If you're an Apple fan looking for interesting Apple-related desk or shelf decor, I don't think you're going to be disappointed by the iBot G3. It's adorable, fits in well with Apple products, and looks good in any home or office environment.


Similarly, if you're looking for a gift for an Apple enthusiast, the iBot G3 is a great choice that will delight everyone who sees it. Hopefully the artist, Philip Lee, will continue to make additional figurines like the iBot G3 based on classic Mac designs because I'm sure Apple fans would love to have a collection of Apple device bots.

How to Buy


The iBot G3 can be purchased from the Classicbot website for $39.

Note: Classicbot provided MacRumors with two iBots for the purpose of this review. No other compensation was received.


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Mac Nostalgia: A Look Back at Clarus the Dogcow

In a new video shared this week by 512 Pixels, Stephen Hackett looks into the history of Clarus the Dogcow, a bitmapped image designed as part of the Cairo font for use on the Macintosh. While starting as part of a simple font language, Clarus grew to prominence on Mac over the years, becoming a popular part of Apple iconography throughout the 1980s and 1990s.


As Hackett explains in his video, Clarus was designed by graphic designer Susan Kare in 1983. Kare created the various fonts for the Macintosh's user interface, and one font in particular had a unique set of glyphs and images to represent the alphabet, referred to as a dingbat font. The letter "z" was represented by a small creature that appeared to merge a dog together with a cow.

Clarus became so endearing to Apple engineers that the Dogcow appeared in various printing programs on Macintosh computers, indicating to users which orientation the paper would be in when it was printed. Eventually, Scott Zimmerman coined the term "Dogcow" in 1987 and Apple employee Mark Harlan named the character Clarus in Technote 31 in the Developer Technical Support documents, to clarify the small animal people were seeing in the printing software.

Images via 512 Pixels

In the entry called "The Dogcow," Harlan stated, "Dogcows, by their nature, are not all dog, nor are they all cow, but they are a special genetic hybrid. They are rarely seen in the wild. Since dogcows are two dimensional, they will stand facing a viewer “on edge” to avoid being seen."
Hackett: "Apple was still performing well at this point, with the dark days of the mid-90s still several years off, and the company had a sense of humor about itself."
Clarus the Dogcow rose to prominence in the early and mid 1990s, thanks to a few videos of the character in early versions of QuickTime. One video shows Clarus riding a merry-go-round, while another has the character spinning in various directions.


At this time, the appearance of Clarus as an Apple icon really began to take off, with the Dogcow showing up in official Apple documentation about rendering on-screen graphics, mousepads, t-shirts, a brand of beer called "Moof Bräu", and even in the Icon Garden on Apple's Infinite Loop campus.

As the 1990s ended, so did the height of Clarus the Dogcow. According to Hackett, "While it's hard to pin the Dogcow's decline directly on Steve Jobs, Clarus became harder and harder to spot after his return to Apple. The Icon Garden came down, and Mac OS X used a less-fun image on the Page Setup screen. While Clarus made a brief appearance with OS X’s Address Book, it was hardly a comeback. The party, as they say, was over."

Clarus has made occasional appearances in recent years, with WWDC developers last year receiving a Clarus the Dogcow pin as part of their swag bags.

Those interested in the history of Clarus the Dogcow should check out the 512 Pixels video and Hackett's History of Clarus the Dogcow.


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Leaked Aquaman Movie Suggests iTunes 4K Stream Cracked for First Time

A 4K version of the movie "Aquaman" has popped up on torrent sites, and, as noted by TorrentFreak, it looks like the file may have come from iTunes, suggesting Apple's protections for 4K content have been breached.

The "Aquaman" file in question, which was shared earlier this week on Reddit, is labeled as a Web-DL, a name used in torrents to denote where it's from. Web-DL indicates a file pulled from a streaming service like Netflix, iTunes, and Amazon.

The title, "Aquaman.2018.2160p.WEB-DL.DDP5.1.HDR.HEVC-MOMA," suggests that this is a 4K release that was decrypted directly from iTunes. This is something that has never happened before with a 4K WEB-DL.
The file is indeed in 4K, and it popped up on torrent sites shortly after the movie was released on iTunes. There are no 4K releases of "Aquaman" from Netflix or Amazon, which led to immediate speculation that someone had managed to decrypt the file from iTunes.

4K files from iTunes have never been spotted on piracy sites before, making this a first that the piracy community is excited about. "4k Web-dl, history has been made today for pirates," wrote one reddit user on the r/piracy subreddit.

TorrentFreak says that it's "too early" to jump to conclusions about the origin of the file. While it's 4K, it could be mislabeled. There's a 4K version on VUDU, though the pirated version was uploaded ahead of the VUDU release.

If it is from iTunes, it's not yet clear how it was accessed. 4K content is only available on the Apple TV via tvOS, suggesting that if there's a security hole, it's in the tvOS operating system.
A source who has experience with the matter believes that it most likely comes from iTunes, as advertised. How, exactly, remains a mystery, but there may be a vulnerability in Apple's tvOS.

"Apple has 4k only on Apple TV running tvOS. I assume they skipped checks, if the device is jailbroken, and someone just dumped the encrypted stream and decrypted it via what's in memory as keys," says our source, who prefers to remain anonymous.
Since Aquaman appeared, two additional 4K Web-DL files for "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse" and "Can You Ever Forgive Me?" have surfaced on torrent sites.

If there is indeed a vulnerability that has been exploited by those who pirate movies to access 4K iTunes content, Apple is likely to implement a fix quickly to prevent pirates from stealing additional 4K movies.


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Apple Shares New ‘iPhone Can Do What?’ Features Page

Apple recently added a new features page to its website, which offers an in-depth look at the capabilities of Apple's modern iPhones.

The site is organized into tiles, each featuring an explanation of a feature along with a short video, a photo, and a link to one of Apple's support documents.


Topics covered include water resistance, privacy, AirDrop, Group FaceTime, photos search, Memoji, Do Not Disturb, Find My iPhone, Apple Pay, iMessage photo effects, and more.


Apple includes both major features like Face ID, along with smaller hints and tips like holding the space bar to move the cursor to quickly fix a typo or double tapping the space bar while typing for a period.


It's a useful site for anyone who isn't super familiar with the feature set on the iPhone, and it's also useful for more advanced users because it also has lesser known options that some people might not know about.


Apple has a whole range of support documents on every topic you might think of, but doesn't often link to them on its main site, which makes the features page unique. Apple is highlighting the new features page on its main Apple.com homepage.


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