Rack Mount Mac Pro Now Available for Purchase Starting at $6,499

Apple today released the rack mount version of the Mac Pro, offering a design that is suited to a rack configuration. Priced starting at $6,499, the rack mount Mac Pro features all of the same configuration options as the standard ‌Mac Pro‌.

Rather than feet or wheels, the rack mount version of the ‌Mac Pro‌ uses stainless steel slide rails that allow it to be slotted into a rack. The machine features the same 3D lattice design for maximizing airflow and top handles for accessing the internals.


The base model of the rack mount ‌Mac Pro‌ is the same as the base model standard ‌Mac Pro‌ featuring a 3.5GHz 8-core Intel Xeon W processor, 32GB RAM, and 256GB of storage.

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Mac Pro Hands-On: Adding Additional SSD Storage Using a PCIe Slot

When the Mac Pro became available for purchase a few weeks ago, we bought a base model and have since been demonstrating upgrades with third-party components for those interested in boosting their ‌Mac Pro‌'s capabilities without having to shell out for Apple's upgrades.

We covered upgrading the RAM in a ‌Mac Pro‌ in our last video, and today, we're demonstrating how to add additional SSD storage using one of the ‌Mac Pro‌'s PCIe slots.

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The base model ‌Mac Pro‌ comes with 256GB of storage space, which isn't a lot in a professional machine. Luckily, it's easy to add additional storage if you purchase a compatible third-party SSD.

Completely replacing the SSD in a ‌Mac Pro‌ with a new one requires visiting an Apple Store or an Apple Authorized Service Provider because the built-in SSD is tied to the T2 chip that provides encryption and other security benefits, but the existing storage can simply be augmented if you have a free PCIe slot.

The ‌Mac Pro‌ has eight PCIe expansion slots, which allow for extra USB ports, graphics cards, audio cards, and more storage, so that's an easy way to get additional storage space. Note that what we've done here means the SSD we're installing is extra storage space and not a boot disk - it's been added in addition to the existing 256GB SSD the base ‌Mac Pro‌ ships with.

We added a 4TB NVMe SSD from OWC, which is priced at $950. That's a good deal cheaper than the 4TB SSD upgrade option from Apple, which is priced at $1,400. You don't need to use OWC, but third-party SSD options are much more affordable than what Apple is offering.

Installing a new SSD is as simple as popping the case off of the ‌Mac Pro‌, unlocking one of the PCIe slots, unscrewing the brackets and inserting the card. That's all there is to it. Once the case is back in place and the ‌Mac Pro‌ is booted up after installing a new SSD, the drive will show up on the desktop.

The OWC Accelsior 4M2 SSD we installed claimed to offer transfer speeds up to 6000MB/s. In our testing, we didn't quite see those speeds, but we did see write speeds at 4786MB/s and read speeds of 5360MB/s, which is much faster than the built-in SSD, which hit write/read speeds of 1312 and 2232MB/s, respectively.

When it comes to real life usage, that meant we were able to transfer 50GB of RAW video files to the OWC SSD in just about 20 seconds, a process that took 40 seconds with Apple's SSD. So it's entirely possible to get a faster SSD than what Apple's offering at a lower price. An OWC model is not required, of course, and for those with a ‌Mac Pro‌ interested in upgrading, it's worth doing some research to find the best price to save money.

We'll have more ‌Mac Pro‌ videos coming in the future, including a look at the Promise Pegasus R4i MPX RAID storage module designed for the ‌Mac Pro‌.

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Apple Now Offering $2,600 8TB SSD Upgrade Option for Mac Pro

When the Mac Pro was released on December 10, Apple promised that an 8TB SSD option would be available in the near future, and as of today, it's possible to choose the 8TB upgrade option when customizing a ‌Mac Pro‌ on Apple's site.

The 8TB SSD upgrade option is priced at $2,600 when adding it to the base ‌Mac Pro‌ model, which ships with a 256GB SSD. The previous top tier SSD was a 4TB upgrade that cost $1,400.


It's not entirely clear why Apple needed to delay the 8TB SSD storage option for the ‌Mac Pro‌ as it became available just a little over a week after the ‌Mac Pro‌ launched.

Apple has also promised that Radeon Pro W5700X and dual Radeon Pro W5700X GPU options are also coming soon, but those did not get released along with the 8TB SSD upgrade option.

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Demo: Upgrading the RAM in the 2019 Mac Pro After Purchase

Apple designed the Mac Pro to be modular and upgradeable, and it's possible to upgrade components that include the SSD and the RAM.

We purchased a base model ‌Mac Pro‌ with the intention of upgrading the RAM after the fact using hardware from OWC, and in our latest YouTube video, we demo swapping out the RAM, which is a straightforward process, but still needs to be done carefully.

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The base model ‌Mac Pro‌ ships with 32GB 2933MHz RAM, but the machine supports up to 1.5TB and has a total of 12 DIMM slots. For the maximum amount of RAM, you do need the 24 or 28-core processors, as the 8, 12, and 16-core options are limited to 768GB of RAM.

Upgrading RAM can be done with other LR-DIMMs or R-DIMMs, but the different memory types can't be mixed with one another. Apple recommends ‌Mac Pro‌ owners make sure to use the same type of memory when installing additional DIMMs or replacing DIMMs.

Apple also recommends using Apple-approved DIMMs purchased by visiting an Apple retail store or an Apple Authorized Reseller, but Apple RAM is super expensive and most upgraders are likely going to want to go with something that saves some cash.

DIMMs can be installed in configurations of 4, 6, 8, or 12, and Apple has a visual aid on how different setups should work in its support document.

Swapping out or adding RAM to the ‌Mac Pro‌ requires the machine to be off, cool, and unplugged. Pulling off the outer aluminum casing is required, and then from there, the DIMM slots are accessible. Existing DIMMs can be accessed by unlocking the DIMM covers, sliding them open, and then using the DIMM ejectors to push it out of the slot.

Putting in new DIMMs can be done by adding a DIMM to an empty slot, seating it in place, and then making sure the DIMM ejectors click closed.

Apple has a very detailed support document that outlines replacing the RAM, and for ‌Mac Pro‌ owners, we recommend reading it thoroughly and following each of Apple's specific steps. Apple warns that causing damage by replacing components in the wrong way won't be covered under warranty, so it's best to use caution and be thorough when upgrading a part.

Apple has a bunch of support documents and tutorial videos dedicated to the ‌Mac Pro‌, which we've rounded up. Apple covers everything from installing new RAM to swapping out GPU modules to replacing the power supply and I/O card.

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Hands-On With Apple’s New 2019 Mac Pro

Apple last week finally launched its long awaited 2019 Mac Pro, providing its professional user base with the high-end high-throughput modular machine they've always hoped for.

We picked up a base model ‌Mac Pro‌ and in our latest YouTube video, we unbox it and share some initial first impressions.

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The ‌Mac Pro‌ arrives in an absolutely massive box weighing over 85 pounds, so getting it out of the packaging is no simple task. There are tabs, lids, velcro straps, and more to contend with, ensuring the machine is secure in its packaging.

Even out of the packaging, the ‌Mac Pro‌ is a heavy duty machine made from quality components, and that "cheese grater" design looks great in person. In reality, the lattice look is functional and meant to maximize airflow for quiet performance.

We have the base model ‌Mac Pro‌, priced at $5,999, with an 8-core 3.5GHz Xeon W processor from Intel, 32GB RAM, a Radeon Pro 580X GPU, and 256GB of SSD storage. We didn't opt for upgrades, but you can add everything from a 28-core processor to 1.5TB of RAM to 4TB of storage (soon to be 8TB), with a maxed out machine costing upwards of $52,000.

Luckily, this is a machine designed to be highly upgradeable, so most of the components can be swapped out later. iFixit gave the ‌Mac Pro‌ a repairability score of 9/10, and said it was a "masterclass in repairability," which is definitely a first for an Apple product.

We can swap out the GPU, add RAM, and take advantage of the eight PCIe slots, though upgrading the SSD will require Apple's assistance because they're tied to the machine's T2 security chip. We're going to be upgrading the RAM in our machine quite soon, so make sure to keep an eye out for that video.

Taking the casing off of the ‌Mac Pro‌ is a bit difficult because it's a tight fit and again, it's heavy, but once the casing has been removed, all of the internal components are easily accessible.

There are both single wide and double wide PCIe slots, with the half-length slot preconfigured with Apple's I/O card. The I/O card features a 3.5mm headphone jack, two Thunderbolt 3 ports, and two USB-A ports. There are also two HDMI ports, a spot for the power supply, and two 10GB Ethernet ports. You'll find two additional Thunderbolt 3 ports at the top of the tower near the power button.

Going back to that lattice design, the ‌Mac Pro‌ is indeed as quiet as Apple promised. There are three fans on one side to optimize airflow, and the housing has been designed to act as a tight seal with internal ducts to maximize the thermal capacity.

The ‌Mac Pro‌ comes with a nice braided power cable, a Lightning to USB cable with the same braided design, nifty black Apple stickers, and a high-quality instruction manual. It also ships with a silver and space gray aluminum Magic Mouse and Magic Keyboard, which is a design unique to the new ‌Mac Pro‌.

The ‌Mac Pro‌ is an impressively built machine, and we're excited to put it through its paces and see what it can do. Stay tuned to MacRumors for more ‌Mac Pro‌ coverage, and let us know what you think of Apple's new machine.

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Base and Middle Tier Mac Pro Models Offer Performance Similar to iMac Pro

Geekbench 5 benchmarks of some of the new Mac Pro processor options are now available, giving us an idea of how the Mac Pro performs relative to other Apple machines.

Based on the available scores, the 8-core, 12-core, and 16-core Mac Pro processors offer performance similar to the processors in the 2017 iMac Pro models.

8-core 2019 Mac Pro vs. 8-core 2017 iMac Pro

The base Mac Pro with an 8-core Xeon W chip has a single-core score of 1008 and a multi-core score of 7606, which is beaten out by the 8-core 2017 iMac Pro's single core score of 1076 and multi-core score of 8120.

Similar scores can also be seen in the higher-core Mac Pro models as well. The 12-core Mac Pro earned a single-core score of 1090 and a multi-core score of 11599, while the 16-core machine earned a single-core score of 1104 and a multi-core score of 14285.

Geekbench 5 single-core Mac scores (8-core model not pictured here but ranking can be seen in full chart)

The 16-core processor in the Mac Pro does win out over the 18-core processor in the 2017 iMac Pro when it comes to both multi-core and single-core performance, but there's not a huge difference in score.

In single-core performance, the new Mac Pro models are outshined by many of Apple's 2019 Macs, especially when it comes to the lowest-end 8-core machine. The higher-end 2019 MacBook Pro models (13, 15, and 16-inch), the high-end Mac mini, and 2019 iMac models all beat out even the 16-core machine when it comes to single-core scores.

In multi-core performance, it's only the iMac Pro models and the high-end iMac that outshine the 8-core Mac Pro, while 12-core and 16-core models are close to the top of the chart.

Geekbench 5 multi-core Mac scores

Though the base and middle tier models offer performance that's fairly similar to the performance you get from many of the 2017 iMac Pro models, the upgradeability and expandability of the Mac Pro should not be overlooked.

Every component is modular and can be improved and upgraded after purchase, with RAM upgrades, SSD upgrades, and GPU upgrades all possible, unlike the iMac Pro.

When it comes to the higher-tier 24 and 28-core processor options in the Mac Pro, we can expect to see performance that far exceeds what's possible with an iMac Pro as the 2017 iMac Pro tops out at the 18-core Xeon processor option.

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iFixit Shares 2019 Mac Pro Teardown: ‘A Masterclass in Repairability’

iFixit has shared its full teardown of the new Mac Pro, calling it "beautiful, amazingly well put together, and a masterclass in repairability."

Given its modular design, the new Mac Pro unsurprisingly earned a nearly perfect repairability score of 9/10, with iFixit noting that basic repairs and upgrades can be performed with standard tools or even no tools at all. Major components also use industry-standard sockets and interfaces.


From a repair standpoint, the only downside is that while the SSDs are modular, they are not user replaceable since they are tied to the Apple T2 security chip. If you need to remove and replace the SSD modules, a support document says to contact Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider instead.

iFixit also has a service manual for the new Mac Pro.

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New Mac Pro Deliveries Begin, European Orders ‘Assembled in China’

Apple's new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR became available to order last week and, on schedule, the first deliveries to customers have begun. The photos below were shared by MacRumors forum member K. Johansen from Oregon.


As suspected, it appears the new Mac Pro is only assembled in Texas for orders placed in the United States, Canada, and other countries in the Americas. French blog MacGeneration has confirmed that a new Mac Pro delivered to a customer in France today has fine print indicating it was assembled in China.


The new Mac Pro starts at $5,999, while the Pro Display XDR retails for $4,999.

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iFixit Shares Mac Pro Uncasing and First Impressions

Repair site iFixit managed to get a Mac Pro on Friday, and has kicked off its traditional teardown with an uncasing and first impressions video.

The video shows the process of removing the ‌Mac Pro‌'s aluminum case and it takes a look at some of the internal components.


For those interested in a quick look at what's inside the ‌Mac Pro‌ and how the different components work, the video is worth checking out.

iFixit plans to share a full ‌Mac Pro‌ teardown next week, likely on Tuesday.

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First Mac Pro Orders Begin Shipping Out to Customers, Delivery Expected on Monday

Just two days after the Mac Pro first became available for purchase, the first orders have begun shipping out and are set to be delivered on Friday.

MacStadium's Brian Stucki ordered a couple of new Mac Pros right when Apple began accepting purchases, and his first ‌Mac Pro‌ is coming in just a few days on December 16, which is earlier than the delivery dates that Apple had listed.


Apple's initial delivery estimates were at one to two weeks after purchase, but orders placed now will not be delivered until December 31 to January 8 due to demand for the machine.

The 2019 ‌Mac Pro‌ is the first new ‌Mac Pro‌ we've had in six years, and it's the followup to the 2013 "trash can" ‌Mac Pro‌ that ultimately failed due to thermal limitations. Apple listened to the needs of professional users with this iteration and designed the updated machine to be modular and easily upgradeable.


Pricing on the ‌Mac Pro‌ starts at $5,999, but goes up depending on the configuration. It supports workstation-class Xeon processors with up to 28 cores, up to 1.5TB RAM, eight PCIe slots, 4TB SSD storage (soon to be 8TB) and dual Radeon Pro Vega Duo GPUs.

A fully equipped ‌Mac Pro‌ will cost over $52,000, with the price tag even higher for those who add Apple's $4,999 Pro Display XDR, a 6K display that's being sold alongside the ‌Mac Pro‌.

With ‌Mac Pro‌ orders set to be in the hands of users starting next week, we should see additional impressions and opinions of the new machine. MacRumors has a new ‌Mac Pro‌ on the way, so expect to see some hands-on content as soon as our new device arrives.

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