Apple’s Design Chief Jony Ive to Speak in Dublin With Stephen Fry This June

Apple's chief designer Jony Ive is set to speak at the Dalkey Book Festival in Dublin, Ireland on Saturday, June 15 at 6:00 p.m.

Ive will be joined by actor and comedian Stephen Fry for a session titled "The Object of Language and the Language of Objects."

Actor, comedian, raconteur, and author, Stephen Fry shares his wit and wisdom with Jony Ive, the man who, by designing three of the most iconic products of our age - the iPod, iPad, and iPhone- has changed your world probably more than any other single living human being.

Truly a one-off event featuring treasured polymath, Stephen Fry, and Apple design guru, Jony Ive. Two global superstars mark the tenth anniversary of the festival by sharing one stage at Dalkey!
Tickets were available for the event from the Dalkey Book Festival website for 30 euros, but have all sold out at this time.

Stephen Fry and Jony Ive know one another, and in 2015, Fry wrote a profile on Ive following the announcement of his chief design officer title. In the past, Fry has also profiled Steve Jobs, and he's long been acquainted with Apple executives.


This article, "Apple's Design Chief Jony Ive to Speak in Dublin With Stephen Fry This June" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Jony Ive Remains ‘Eager to Create’ and ‘Completely in Awe’ About Creative Process

Apple design chief Jony Ive, who was awarded the 2018 Stephen Hawking Fellowship in September, delivered the Stephen Hawking Fellowship Lecture at The Cambridge Union, the University of Cambridge's debate society, on Monday.

Jony Ive speaking at The Cambridge Union via Apple/The Independent

Ive spoke about a wide range of topics, reflecting on his career at Apple, technology, and design as a whole, according to The Independent. We've rounded up some of his comments from the speech below.

How using a Mac for the first time led Ive to find out more about Apple and ultimately join the company in 1992:
With the Mac, in 1988, I think I learned two things. Firstly, I could actually use it. I loved using it and it became a very powerful tool that helped me design and create. Secondly, and I think this is in some ways a rather embarrassing admission because this was at the end of four years of studying design, I realized that what you make represents who you are.

It stands testament to your values and your preoccupations, and using the Mac I sensed a clear and direct connection with the people who actually created the Macintosh. For the first time, I remember being moved by obvious humanity and care beyond just the functional imperative.
How the idea behind Multi-Touch was conceived around 2002 to 2003 and eventually led to the App Store in 2008:
This was a project that we came to describe as multi-touch. Some of you may remember the first time you experienced the interface. Perhaps it was on one of the first iPhones or later on an iPad. But multi-touch describes the ability to directly touch and interact with your content to be able to pinch to zoom an image or flick through a list with your fingers.

Importantly, it defined an opportunity to create applications with their own unique, very specific interface. So, not being generic but being specific inherently describes the application's function. We came to see that we could make applications purposeful, compelling and intuitive to use. And so, as the potential for a vast range of apps became clear, so did the idea for an app store.
Ive on how he remains "eager to create":
I remain completely in awe, completely enchanted by the creative process. I love the unpredictability and the surprise. The whole process is fabulously terrifying and so uncertain. But I love that on Monday, there's nothing. There is no idea, there is no conversation, the room is silent, there's certainly not a drawing. Prototypes are way in the future. On Monday, there is nothing, but on Wednesday, there is. No matter how partial, how tentative. Now, the problem is: which Wednesday?"
Ive on how there is a "fundamental conflict" between "curiosity and the resolve and focus that is necessary to solve problems":
Honestly, I can't think of two ways of working, two different ways of being, that are more polar. On one hand to be constantly questioning, loving surprises, consumed with curiosity and yet on the other hand having to be utterly driven and completely focused to solve apparently insurmountable problems, even if those solutions are without precedent or reference. And so, of course, this is where it becomes sort of ironic and teeters towards the utterly absurd.
More Coverage: Apple designer Jony Ive explains how 'teetering towards the absurd' helped him make the iPhone by David Phelan


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Apple Design Chief Jony Ive Talks iPad Pro Design in New Interview

Following Tuesday's event, Apple Design Chief Jony Ive did an interview with The Independent, where he shared some thoughts on Apple's new product lineup and what makes a device "appear magical."

Ive explained that the design of the iPad Pro is "so singular and integrated" that it stands out from "99 percent of other complex technology products."


Specifically, Ive pointed out the display of the device, which uses a subpixel anti-aliasing technique to produce rounded corners that flow into the sides of the screen smoothly and without distortion.

Ive said he finds traditional displays with square corners "disappointing" because it turns the display into a distinct component when assembled into a design without square corners.
If you look at the iPad Pro, though, you can see how the radius, the curve in the corner of the display, is concentric with and sympathetic to the actual enclosure. You feel it's authentic, and you have the sense that it's not an assembly of a whole bag of different components: it's a single, clear product.
Ive said that one of Apple's goals with the iPad was to create a sense that the product is not oriented in a specific way. The new iPad Pro, says Ive, doesn't have an orientation because there's no Home button, speakers are all around the device, and Face ID works in landscape and portrait modes.

The simple flat edge of the iPad Pro is also an achievement, something Apple was able to implement when the engineering teams were able to pare down the thickness of the iPad Pro. Ive says Apple couldn't have attempted a straightforward edge detail like that when the products weren't as thin.

These seemingly simple changes are "the most difficult thing to do." Ive said Apple is most proud of the things that should be there but aren't. "It's an odd thing when you're most proud of those things which aren't there.

As for the second-generation Apple Pencil, the way that it snaps onto the side of the iPad Pro is an example of "a magical feeling." The new Apple Pencil connects to magnets built into the iPad Pro's enclosure, and when connected, it both pairs and charges.

Ive says that designing products like the Apple Pencil that introduce features no one knew they wanted until they debuted is a "fundamental part" of his job. He doesn't work with articulated problems and he says it's rare that new Apple designs come in response to a known problem.

Ive said when changing a well-known and loved product like the iPad, there's a need to not "fall into the trap of just making things different." It's important when changing things not to "make it different, but make it better."
"If you are making changes that are in the service of making something better, then you don't need to convince people to fall in love with it again. Our sense of habit and familiarity with something is so developed, there is always that initial reaction that is more of a comment on something being different rather than necessarily better or worse. In my experience, if we try very hard to make material improvements, people quickly recognise those and make the sort of connection they had before with the product."
Ive's full interview, which goes into more depth about the design decisions made for the iPad Pro, can be read over at The Independent.


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Jony Ive Discusses His Team’s Move to Apple Park, Remains Tight-Lipped About Prospects of Apple Car

Apple's design chief Jony Ive sat down for an interview over lunch with Financial Times reporter Nicholas Foulkes earlier this month, discussing a wide range of topics, including the Apple Watch, Apple Park, and prospects of an Apple Car.

Jony Ive portrait via Financial Times

Questioned on why Apple's design team was among the last to move into the company's new Apple Park headquarters, Ive said that was the plan all along, adding that relocating some 9,000 people takes time:
It wasn't late, it was always scheduled to be then. When you're moving 9,000 people, you don't do it in one day. We're one of the last groups. It's a loaded and significant event because it meant leaving a studio that has decades of history, where we designed and built first prototypes. This is the studio I went back to on the day that Steve died. And it's the place where we figured out the iPhone and the iPod.
Ive said his team's move to Apple Park has allowed for increased collaboration among different areas of creative expertise:
Moving to Apple Park represents the coming together, at last, of these different areas of creative expertise that are incredibly diverse. I'm fairly confident that this has never happened before, to have industrial designers next to font designers, next to prototypers, next to haptic experts. The best haptic experts in the world are sat next to a bunch of guys who have PhDs in material science.
On the prospects of an Apple Car, Ive remained tight lipped. In general, he said it's important to work on the associated issues and challenges with any new product, rather than talk about it and risk having the ideas and technologies copied:
We explore so many different thoughts and so many different technologies for products or services. Some companies use the fact that they are exploring lots of different ideas as a PR tool — we don't. If you are genuinely working on something, it's better to be working on it and struggling with the associated issues and challenges, rather than talking about it. Our capital, our equity, is our ideas and the technologies that we're developing. It's important that as long as possible that remains ours, to try and postpone that point when they will then be copied — which is what history suggests.
When asked if the Apple Watch is best described as a watch, Ive instead referred to it as a "very powerful computer":
No, I think that this is a very powerful computer, with a range of very sophisticated sensors, that is strapped to my wrist. That's neither very descriptive nor very helpful. You and I share the same perspective and we had this same challenge with the product that we called the iPhone. Clearly the capability of the iPhone extends way beyond the function of what we would traditionally call a phone.
Ive went on to say that Apple believes it has a responsibility to understand and mitigate the implications and consequences, both positive and negative, of the products it creates — i.e. Screen Time in iOS 12. "It keeps me awake," he said:
If you genuinely have a concern for humanity, you will be preoccupied with trying to understand the implications, the consequences of creating something that hasn’t existed before. I think it's part of the culture at Apple to believe that there is a responsibility that doesn't end when you ship a product… It keeps me awake.
Also See: Jony Ive Talks Secrecy, His Future, and More at WIRED Anniversary Event




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Apple Design Chief Jony Ive Talks Secrecy, His Future, and More at WIRED Anniversary Event

Apple design chief Jony Ive sat down with Vogue's Anna Wintour this morning for an interview at WIRED's 25th anniversary event, where he talked about secrecy at Apple, his future with the company, and more.

WIRED didn't stream the event, but CNET's Shara Tibken and Washington Post's Geoffrey Fowler were on hand and shared details on what Ive had to say on Twitter.

Image via Shara Tibken

On the topic of iPhone addiction, Ive said that it's good to be connected, but the "real issue" is what's done with that connection. According to Ive, when it comes to innovating, it's impossible to predict all of the consequences. "In my experience, there have been surprising consequences," he said. "Some fabulous and some less so."

Apple introduces new features like Screen Time because the company doesn't believe that its responsibility for a product ends when the product is shipped. Apple, says Ive, wants to design its technology to be more human to "restore some humanity" in the way people connect with one another.

When questioned about why Apple is so secretive and keeps its projects under wraps as much as possible, Ive said that not being secretive would be "bizarre." Not many creators would want to talk about what they're doing "when they're halfway through it," he said.
I've been doing this for long enough where I actually feel a responsibility to not confuse or add more noise about what's being worked on because I know that it sometimes does not work out.
According to Ive, he's at Apple for the long haul. He continues to see a lot to do with Apple, and is happy with the team that he works with. The "energy and vitality" at Apple is "extraordinary" and "very exciting" Ive said.
Ive: "If you lose that childlike excitement, I think then it's probably time to do something else.

Wintour: "Are you at that point?"

Ive: "Oh goodness, no."
Ive is still learning at Apple with each new project, and when asked about the last thing he learned, he said that it was a detail on how you can connect glass to a structural frame. "We're still surprised and learning so much," he said.

It's not yet clear if WIRED plans to share the full interview Anna Wintour conducted with Jony Ive, but should a video or additional details be published, we'll update this post.


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Apple Design Chief Jony Ive Awarded 2018 Stephen Hawking Fellowship

Apple Design Chief Jony Ive has been awarded the 2018 Stephen Hawking Fellowship, the Cambridge Union announced on Tuesday.

Charles Connor, Cambridge Union Society President, said Ive was one of the "most influential individuals in modern technology" when announcing the award.

Ive will speak during the Michaelmas term (the first academic term) at Cambridge University's Debating Chamber, where he is expected to offer "reflection on his career, split with a more general reflection on technology and design as a whole."

The fellowship, which is an honorary scholarship to recognize the recipients' contributions to STEM fields and social discourse, was created by the Cambridge Union Society in partnership with professor Stephen Hawking in 2017.

Stephen Hawking delivered the Inaugural Fellowship Lecture in November of 2017 after the Union Society approached him about the creation of a fellowship in his name. It was one of his last public appearances before his death in 2018.


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Jony Ive on Apple Watch Series 4: ‘Every Bone in My Body Tells Me This is Very Significant’

Apple's chief designer, Jony Ive, recently discussed this week's reveal of the Apple Watch Series 4 with The Washington Post, stating that "Every bone in my body tells me this is very significant."

Ive's comment references new health-related features in the Apple Watch Series 4, including the ability to detect if you've fallen down and a new feature that lets you take an ECG measurement -- the first time that’s been possible in a wrist-worn device. In the interview, the designer further states that the new watch "will be a more marked tipping point in understanding and adoption of the product."


According to Ive, Apple plans to focus on further separating the Apple Watch from the iPhone in the future, in addition to increasing the reliability of internet and cellular connectivity.
Ive won’t give away how Apple wearables could spiral beyond the watch, though company watchers expect an augmented reality device could be in the works. He hints that the watch, on the other hand, could evolve in the years to come.

“The clues for the future are when you can have a high degree of confidence that you personally are connected to the Net — not your phone, you,” said Ive. Sporting a new watch with a white rubberized band, Ive said the gadget has helped him lessen his dependence on his phone.
Ive says that he became "zealous" about the Apple Watch following the thousands of user letters sent to the company, in which people describe how the wearable saved their life. These life-saving Apple Watch stories have grown frequent in the years since Apple debuted the Apple Watch in 2015, with many referencing the device's ability to pick up on abnormal heart patterns and others using the Apple Watch's emergency 911 feature.
“I’m so zealous about the watch because I see it as making a material difference to people’s quality of life and actually their ability to be alive,” Ive said.
Ive also mentions that the increased display area of Apple Watch Series 4 is beneficial to users who want to reduce the screen time on their iPhones. Ive says that while the Series 4 displays are bigger, they aren't so expansive that you'll become sucked into a social media spiral.
“The screen size isn’t so expansive that you somehow feel you’ll fill every minute browsing whatever you browse, whether it’s your social media, ” said Ive. He added: “It addresses that functional imperative of being able to be in touch. ”
We've got plenty of other Apple Watch Series 4 coverage for those looking for more information on the device, including an announcement post, hands-on, breakdown of every Series 4 collection, and comparison to the Series 3. Those interested will be able to pre-order Apple Watch Series 4 -- as well as the iPhone XS and XS Max -- beginning at 12:01 a.m. PDT on September 14.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 4, watchOS 5
Buyer's Guide: Apple Watch (Caution)

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Apple Design Chief Jony Ive to Speak at WIRED’s 25th Anniversary Event in October

Apple design chief Jony Ive will be one of the speakers at WIRED's upcoming 25th anniversary event that's set to take place in San Francisco, California from October 12 to October 15, the magazine announced today.

Ive does not often participate in public discussions, so WIRED's event represents a rare opportunity where he will speak on stage. Ive is set to participate in the event on Monday, October 15.

WIRED's summit features many high-profile speakers in addition to Ive, including Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki, Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, and more.

There are no details on what Ive will discuss specifically, but the event is focused on "a day of smart, relevant business conversations." WIRED editor in chief Nicholas Thompson called the event "a great way to look back at everything that has changed, and to look ahead at what will change next too." From the event website:
In 1993, WIRED made a bold prediction--that technology would radically change our world. This year, the silver anniversary edition of our annual Business Conference will gather the titans of tech from the past 25 years on one stage. They'll reflect on the innovations that made the whole world WIRED and introduce you to the ideas and leaders who will shape the 25 years to come.
An all access pass to WIRED's event, which includes the discussion with tech leaders, a festival, and an event at WIRED's office is priced at $1,125. A ticket to the summit where Ive will speak is priced at $993. Pricing is valid until August 20, at which point the ticket cost will increase.


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Jony Ive on Apple Watch: ‘Everything We Did Was in the Pursuit of What We Thought Was the Best Solution’

Apple's design chief Jony Ive, who is responsible for overseeing the creation and design language of almost all of Apple's products, even down to its stores and campuses, recently sat down for an interview with Benjamin Clymer, the founder of watch-focused site Hodinkee.

Ive shared details on the creation process behind the Apple Watch, some of Apple's inspiration for the device, and the experts the company consulted with, along with background on the first watches he purchased, Apple's focus on health, what he finds inspiring, and more.


Ive's first watch of note was an Omega Speedmaster, which he says he bought in 1992 on a trip to Kowloon. Ive says he was "utterly seduced" by its use in space exploration. "Somehow it epitomizes the optimism, ambition, and courage of invention," he said. Ive said he also admires the Nautilus by Patek Philippe, which he describes as a "bizarre, bizarre object."

According to Ive, Apple CEO Steve Jobs had no particular interest in watches, and so early discussions for the watch didn't take place until 2012, a few months after Jobs passed away. The death, said Ive, caused Apple to "think about where we wanted to go" and what trajectory Apple was on as a company. Apple was also exploring its contribution to its users. "I think, incontrovertibly, that Apple since the 1970s has made difficult-to-comprehend and inaccessible technology easy to understand and accessible."

The Apple Watch, with its focus on the personal, was the next logical step in device development, and its creation was different from many of the products that came before it because there were existing references. "Normally there are no parallel products from which to learn," said Ive. Given the historical context of the watch, though, Apple did something "highly unusual" and consulted a range of experts.

Ive says Apple asked seven experts for their assistance with the Apple Watch while it was still in development, and he provided details to Hodinkee. Apple consulted Will Andrewes (a horologist with 40 years of expertise), Jonathan Betts (Curator Emeritus at the Royal Observatory), Dominique Fléchon (a specialist in antiquarian horology), Grégory Gardinetti (Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie historian), Claudia Hammond (a writer and psychology lecturer), David Rooney (Keeper of Technologies and Engineering at the London Science Museum), and Chris Lintott (an astrophysicist at the University of Oxford). Marc Newson, who Ive said is his best friend, was also involved in the Apple Watch's development as he had designed several watches in the past.

Apple wasn't aiming to solve a particular problem with the Apple Watch, according to Ive. It was more so a "matter of optimization - of opportunity." In the vein of "opportunity" Ive also alluded to future Apple Watch development and how much more impressive the idea of opportunity is to him because he knows the technology Apple has in development.
You can look at Apple Watch in terms of trade docs - what it does, etcetera - or you can look at what would be possible if you knew that you had this much technology with you at all times. Many of us have our phones with us all the time, but they aren't connected to you. Imagine having something this powerful with you at all times, and what opportunities that might present to the user.

That the opportunity is phenomenal. Particularly when [you] don't understand just where we are today in terms of technology and capability, but where we are headed.
Despite the early input from horological experts and the storied history of the watch, Ive says there were no homages in the Apple Watch. "Everything served a purpose," said Ive. "Everything we did was in the pursuit of what we thought was the best solution." Ive used the digital crown as an example, which he said "took a modicum of courage" to implement with Apple's typical disposition towards "direct manipulation."

According to Ive, one of Apple's aims with the Apple Watch was to "broaden how relevant we were," which is why the company explored new materials like the gold and ceramic that's been used for higher-end Edition watches. Ive says that working in gold and ceramic was "purposeful" for expanding "who Apple is" and from a materials science perspective as it will help with the development of future products.

Health-based capabilities were "an early and significant focus" of the Apple Watch, and Ive says that feedback from customers who have had health benefits from the Apple Watch has been hugely motivating. In fact, he says that he finds customer feedback much more motivating than Apple's new position as the largest watchmaker by revenue.
I am honestly far more motivated by hearing from one customer who believes that the Watch has materially improved his or her life. It's a privilege to work on products that people develop an affection for and that become an important and positive part of their daily lives.
The full Ive interview, which goes into much greater depth on many topics surrounding Apple Watch development, can be read over at Hodinkee.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 4
Buyer's Guide: Apple Watch (Neutral)

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Jony Ive Talks About His Design Process, Apple Secrecy, Steve Jobs, and More in New Interview

Apple chief design officer Jony Ive recently sat down with model and actress Naomi Campbell for an interview, discussing topics like his design process, Steve Jobs, Apple secrecy, and more (via Vogue).

Campbell asked about Ive's personal involvement in the manufacturing process, bringing up a rumor she heard that he slept on factory floors when Apple was making the first iPhone. Ive didn't specifically confirm the rumor, but he mentioned he has "stayed for months" in the places that Apple makes its products. "I don’t know how you can be an effective designer and not do that," he said.

Image via Vogue

On the topic of Apple's secrecy:
I don't really see it as being secretive – if I'm working on something and it's not finished, I don't want to show somebody! One of the defining things about the nature of ideas is just how fragile they are: when you're not sure whether some-thing is going to work, the idea is vulnerable. Part of protecting the idea is to be careful about who you show it to; premature criticism can shut something down that perhaps deserves more of a chance.
Ive also discussed former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, mentioning that the two "looked at the world in the same way," and that he appreciates and misses Jobs more as time goes on. When Campbell asked about lessons learned from Jobs, Ive said that Jobs' way of thinking has stuck with him: "There was an incredible liberty in the way he would think. He wouldn’t obey rules that were perceived to be accepted wisdom, and he had an extraordinary optimism and enthusiasm."

Ive also stated that he thinks of Jobs and his values when hiring new people at Apple:
The main thing is how they see the world. Ultimately, Steve's legacy is a set of values and, I think, the belief in trying. Often the quietest voices are the easiest to overlook, but he was brilliant at listening as well as leading and speaking. A lot of com-munication is listening – not just listening to figure out what you want to say in response.
The Ive-Campbell interview has been published ahead of Ive's sponsorship of former fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa's work at London's Design Museum in May. Ive said that he used to watch Alaïa design and was in "utter awe": "It was incredible to see the way that he understood material, and the way he would be frustrated with material and so create new ones. And then these beautiful forms would emerge."

To read the full interview, visit Vogue's website.


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