Apple CEO Tim Cook: iPhone 11 Sales Are Off to a ‘Very, Very Good Start’

Ahead of today's earnings call covering the fourth fiscal quarter of 2019, Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview with Reuters that iPhone 11 sales are off to a "very, very good start" so far, and the launch has led to improved sales in key markets like China.

In China in particular, the lower $699 starting price of the ‌iPhone 11‌ is "more similar to the price points that [Apple] had great success with in the past," Cook said, which helped drive sales.


Apple is predicting strong holiday quarter sales with guidance between $85.5 billion to $89.5 billion, and Cook said that the guidance is based on strong sales of services and wearables as well as promising early sales of the new 2019 iPhones. Apple no longer provides specific sales data on the iPhone, so it's difficult to determine how many of the new devices that Apple sold.

Cook said that the numbers also reflect Apple's belief that the United States and China will resolve their trade dispute. "I don't know every chapter of the book, but I think that will eventually happen," Cook said. "I certainly hope it happens during the quarter, but we'll see about that."

Lowering iPhone prices for older iPhones in China has also helped slow mid-year sales declines. iPhone sales in China picked up towards the end of the quarter, and Apple also saw double-digit services revenue growth in China.

"iPhone had a remarkable comeback from the way we performed earlier in the year," Cook told Reuters.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro
Tag: China

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iPhone 11 and 11 Pro: Camera Features and Tips

With the new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro, Apple introduced updated dual and triple-lens camera systems, respectively, and added quite a few new camera features that are worth knowing about.

In our latest YouTube video, we've highlighted all of the most useful camera features and functions included in the ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro for those who are coming from an older iPhone and want to know what's new.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Photos Outside the Frame


When you take a photo with the telephoto or wide-angle camera on the ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ or the wide-angle lens on the ‌iPhone 11‌, there's a feature that automatically captures what's outside the frame using one of the other lenses, just in case you accidentally cut something out.

camera
You can turn this on in the Camera section of the Settings app and take advantage of it when editing pictures in the ‌Photos‌ app. Any photo with a square icon and a star has more outside the frame that can be used when changing the crop of the photo. It's a bit of a niche feature, but it can come in handy for group shots, landscape images, architecture photos, and other situations where you might want to change the crop of the image after taking a picture.

‌Photos‌ Outside the Frame doesn't work on all images all the time and you're not going to want to leave it on all the time because it disables another feature -- Deep Fusion.

Deep Fusion


When you upgrade to iOS 13.2, you'll get a new camera feature called Deep Fusion, which is something that works in the background and doesn't need to be turned on. Deep Fusion uses machine learning and the A13 chip in the ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro for pixel-by-pixel processing of photos, optimizing for texture, details, and noise reduction in each part of an image.


You're going to notice it most in photos of people and pets where fabric, hair, and other such textures are prominent. Deep Fusion is designed to work primarily on indoor photos and in situations where the lighting is kind of at a medium level - not too bright and not so dark that Night Mode is engaged. Deep Fusion is automatic and can't be turned on or off, but it does get disabled when you have ‌Photos‌ Outside the Frame turned on.

‌Night Mode‌


‌Night Mode‌ is one of the key features in the ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro so you've heard of it and probably tried it out if you have one of the new iPhones, but there are a few little tips worth knowing.


‌Night Mode‌ comes on automatically in situations with low lighting, and you know that it's activated when you see a yellow icon at the top of the iPhone's camera with a little moon icon and a number.


With ‌Night Mode‌ shots, Apple requires you to hold the camera steady for a few seconds while it takes multiple images of a scene to get the best possible lighting, so that number on the icon is the number of seconds that the shot will last.

Apple automatically selects the best exposure period based on the lighting conditions, but if you tap that moon icon, you can adjust the slider to the left to turn off ‌Night Mode‌ if desired or to the right to choose a longer exposure, which can slightly change the look of the photo.


In general, Apple's default settings are good and most people aren't going to need to adjust their ‌Night Mode‌ exposure times. Knowing how to turn ‌Night Mode‌ off is useful, though, as there are times that you might want to get a quick night time shot.

To get the best ‌Night Mode‌ shots, make sure to hold your iPhone as steady as possible for the recommended number of seconds, and choose a scene with a subject that isn't moving much.

Live Photos


In iOS 13 Apple will automatically group ‌Live Photos‌ in succession together, letting you watch them video style. If you have several ‌Live Photos‌ that you took at one time, you can press on the first of the bunch and it will show you the playback from all of the ‌Live Photos‌ that you took rather than just the few seconds from a single Live Photo.

photos
You can also select all of the ‌Live Photos‌ that you took, tap on the Share icon (square with an arrow through it) and then choose to save that as a video.

This probably isn't a feature that you'll use too often, but it's nice to know that it's available if you've done something like take a bunch of photos of a pet or child and want to turn it into a little video instead.

These ‌Live Photos‌ changes are available on the ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro, but can also be used on older iPhones running ‌iOS 13‌.

Quick Take


The ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro have a neat Quick Take feature that makes it easy to take a video without having to swap over into video mode. If you're shooting photos and decide to make a video instead, just hold down on the shutter button and it will start recording.

camera
If you want to keep recording for more than a few seconds, keep holding and swipe over to the right side of the screen to continue the video in the video mode.

Burst Mode


Holding down the shutter button is actually how Burst Mode works in older iPhones, so if you're missing Burst Mode, don't worry, there's still a method to use it.

Hold down the shutter button for Quick Take mode and then just swipe over to the left instead of the right to activate Burst Mode. Burst Mode takes multiple photos in quick succession and then lets you choose the best of the bunch.

Portrait Mode


When using Portrait Mode on the ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ and iPhone 11 Pro Max, you're no longer limited to just one lens. On the iPhone XS and XS Max, only the telephoto lens worked with Portrait Mode, but with the new iPhones, Portrait Mode works with both the telephoto and wide-angle lenses.

To swap lenses, swipe over into Portrait Mode, and then tap on the little "2x" or "1x" icons on the left side of the screen to zoom in or out. Using 1x mode will let you fit more into the photo and it's perfect for scenes with multiple people or objects, while 2x mode is great for zooming in on a single person, pet, or other item.

The ‌iPhone 11‌ doesn't have a telephoto lens, so it is limited to the wide-angle lens and no zooming in is possible.

Wider Selfies


The front-facing camera has also been updated with an option that lets you get more in the frame, which is perfect for group selfie shots.

With the front-facing camera activated, tap on the little arrow towards the bottom of the screen to zoom in or zoom out. Zooming in and out only works in standard Photo mode, and you can't use it with front-facing Portraits.

‌iPhone 11‌ and ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ Camera How Tos



More ‌iPhone 11‌ and ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ Tips


For more on what's new in the iPhone 11 and the iPhone 11 Pro, make sure to check out our dedicated roundups (linked above) that go over all of the features in the new devices.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro camera features or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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Apple Boosts iPhone 11 Component Orders But Cuts Them for iPhone 11 Pro Max

Apple has reportedly boosted component orders for the iPhone 11 after better-than-expected demand but reduced those for the iPhone 11 Pro Max after flat sales of the larger device, according to sources from Taiwan's supply chain (via DigiTimes).

Apple has increased ‌iPhone 11‌ components orders by 15%, and cut those for ‌iPhone 11 Pro Max‌ by about 5%, the sources said.
Today's report corroborates a similar report earlier this month that said ‌iPhone 11‌ and iPhone 11 Pro are seeing the strongest demand, with Apple revising orders for the ‌iPhone 11 Pro Max‌ down slightly to balance production with demand.

DigiTimes' sources speculate that brisk ‌iPhone 11‌ sales could influence Apple's 2020 iPhone plans, suggesting the company could choose to keep an LCD-based smartphone in next year's flagship lineup instead of adopting OLED wholesale.

According to reliable Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, Apple intends to complete its transition to an all-OLED iPhone lineup in 2020 with new 5.4-inch, 6.1-inch, and 6.7-inch devices.

Kuo also believes Apple will sell around 10 percent more iPhones in the first quarter of 2020, thanks to strong replacement demand for its ‌iPhone 11‌ series devices and the launch of the "iPhone SE 2" in March.

In addition, sources in today's report indicate that King Yuan Electronics (KYEC) continues to see strong demand for Intel baseband chips that Apple uses for the ‌iPhone 11‌, iPhone 8 and iPhone XR.

At the beginning of October, Apple reportedly asked suppliers to increase production of its new ‌iPhone 11‌ and ‌iPhone 11 Pro‌ lineup by up to 10 percent, adding up to 8 million units to its earlier production plans as it sought to meet better-than-expected demand.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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Mophie Launches Juice Pack Access Cases for iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max

Mophie this week launched new Juice Pack Access cases for the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max. This is Mophie's first set of battery cases for the new 2019 iPhone lineup, which were announced back in September.

Like other Juice Pack accessories, the Juice Pack Access case for iPhone 11 provides up to an additional 15 hours of audio or 5 additional hours of video to your ‌iPhone 11‌. The ‌iPhone 11‌ and 11 Pro cases have a 2,000 mAh battery while the iPhone 11 Pro Max case has a 2,200 mAh battery.


You can charge the accessory wirelessly on Qi-compatible charging mats or through USB-C, and then activate it by pressing the button on the lower bottom of the back of the case.

Mophie said that the case provides a compact design with high-impact protection. It includes internal rubberized support pads to protect the iPhone from drops, and raised corners to prevent scratches on the display.

Apple is believed to be working on Smart Battery Cases of its own for the ‌iPhone 11‌ line, but as of yet the company has not announced any solid details about new versions of its charging case accessory. For the iPhone XS generation, Apple didn't release Smart Battery Cases until January 2019, months after the September 2018 iPhone launch.

The Juice Pack Access is available for the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max, all priced at $99.95. Colors for all models include Black, Blush Pink, and Product(Red), although stock availability fluctuates on some options.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Mophie. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro
Tag: Mophie

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YouTube App Adds HDR Support for iPhone 11

Over the weekend, MacRumors forum users noted that the most recent YouTube App update added HDR support for the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro. YouTube has supported HDR on its iOS app since the iPhone X but has required updates to support new hardware.


To check to see if you are watching YouTube videos at their highest quality, you can simply press the three dots on the top right of the video, and you should see "HDR" options listed on supported videos. HDR options will also only be available on devices that support HDR.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro
Tag: HDR

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Apple on Course to Retake Second Place in Global Smartphone Vendor Ranking

Apple is on course to recapture second place from Huawei in the global smartphone vendor ranking in the fourth quarter of 2019, reports DigiTimes.


The change in ranking is said to be a combined effect of strong sales of Apple's iPhone 11 lineup and the impact of Huawei's trade ban in the United States.

Despite being blacklisted by the U.S. government in the middle of the second quarter this year, Huawei has managed to ship 60 million handsets, which is around the same amount it shipped in the previous quarter, according to data from Gartner.

However, as the trade ban drags on, Huawei is expect to see sales slide over the second half of this year. Gartner estimates that shipments could fall to about 50 million units in the third quarter, before bouncing back to 60 million units going into the holiday period.

According to IDC, Apple shipped 36 million iPhones in Q1 2019. Sales are said to have dropped to 34 million in the second quarter, with an expected slide to 30 million units in Q3 as people waited for Apple's next-generation flagship devices, iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max.

But with reports of higher-than-expected sales of its iPhone 11 lineup both domestically and abroad, Apple could see its handset shipments reach 70 million units in the fourth quarter, which would exceed the 60 million units Huawei is expected to ship in Q4 2019.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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Kuo: iPhone 11 Demand and Upcoming Launch of ‘iPhone SE 2’ to Boost Overall iPhone Sales Growth in Q1 2020

Apple will sell around 10 percent more iPhones in the first quarter of 2020, thanks to strong replacement demand for its iPhone 11 series devices and next year's launch of the "iPhone SE 2," claims Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo in his latest research note, seen by MacRumors.

We expect that combined iPhone shipments in 1Q20 will grow around 10% YoY thanks to the iPhone 11's replacement demand boosted by more affordable prices and iPhone SE2's shipments starting in 1Q20. We estimate that iPhone shipment in 1Q20 will be 45–50mn units (iPhone 11 Pro series and iPhone 11 to be 13–15 and 22–24mn units, respectively), which is better than around 42mn units of iPhone shipments in 1Q19 (iPhone XS series and iPhone XR to be around 12 and 14mn units, respectively).
The TFI Securities analyst estimates that iPhone 11 series shipments will reach between 70 and 75 million units in 2019, and he believes that figure may have been higher but for supply constraints. Kuo has previously indicated Apple may have upped orders from suppliers after stronger-than-expected demand for its latest flagship phones.

Specifically, Kuo estimates that shipments of the iPhone 11 Pro in 2019 will be around 37-40 million units, and shipments of the iPhone 11 will be around 36 to 40 million units.

If those figures are accurate, Kuo says Pro series shipments will be lower than last year's equivalent iPhone XS shipments, but only because of a tighter supply caused by "increased production difficulties" of specific iPhone 11 Pro components. Meanwhile, shipments of iPhone 11 will be higher than 2018's iPhone XR, mainly because the iPhone XR didn't start shipping until the middle of the fourth quarter.

Kuo says Apple has increased some suppliers' shipment forecasts or capacity requirements in the fourth quarter to ensure that shipments going into next year meet demand. Boosted by more affordable prices, the high replacement demand for the iPhone 11 could run into the first quarter of 2020, the analyst believes. As a result, Kuo estimates that "iPhone 11 shipments in 1Q20 (22–24mn units) will be better than those of iPhone XR in 1Q19 (14mn units) significantly."

Kuo has previously claimed that Apple plans to release a lower-priced "iPhone SE 2" in the first quarter of 2020. Earlier this month, he said the device will feature a similar form factor design and specifications as the iPhone 8, with a faster A13 chip and 3GB of RAM.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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Apple Reportedly Increasing iPhone 11 Lineup Production by Up to 10% Due to Strong Demand

Apple has asked suppliers to increase production of its new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro lineup by up to 10 percent, according to Nikkei Asian Review. The bump in production would add up to 8 million units to the current production plans as Apple seeks to meet stronger-than-expected demand.

"This autumn is so far much busier than we expected," one source with direct knowledge of the situation said. "Previously, Apple was quite conservative about placing orders," which were less than for last year's new iPhone. "After the increase, prepared production volume for the iPhone 11 series will be higher compared to last year," the source said.
The report claims the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro are seeing the strongest demand, while Apple is actually revising orders for the iPhone 11 Pro Max down slightly as it seeks to balance production with demand.

Nearly every year, stories circulate about Apple cutting production in the months following the launches of new iPhones, but it's frequently unclear whether production cuts are due to weaker-than-expected demand or simply anticipated scaling back following the initial rush of orders. Regardless, an increase in production this year appears to be a good sign for Apple.

With the launch of three new iPhone models with improved cameras, Apple's iPhone lineup may be appealing to a broad array of customers ready to upgrade from older models, particularly with the iPhone 11 starting at $699, which is $50 less than its iPhone XR predecessor.

Those looking for an even more budget-friendly new iPhone may have some welcome news early next year, with multiple reliable sources indicating that Apple is planning to launch a new "iPhone SE 2" that would actually look very similar to the iPhone 8 but with upgraded internals such as Apple's latest A13 chip and 3 GB of RAM.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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Haptic Touch vs 3D Touch: What’s the Difference?

With the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max, Apple did away with 3D Touch across its entire iPhone lineup, replacing the former 3D Touch feature with Haptic Touch.

In this guide, we'll go over everything you need to know about Haptic Touch and how it differs from the 3D Touch feature that's been available since the iPhone 6s.


What is Haptic Touch?


Haptic Touch is a 3D Touch-like feature that Apple first introduced in the 2018 iPhone XR and later expanded to its entire iPhone lineup.

Haptic Touch uses the Taptic Engine and provides haptic feedback when the screen is pressed on one of Apple's new iPhones. A Haptic Touch is a touch and hold gesture, and it can be used across the iOS 13 operating system.


Haptic Touch can be used by pressing in a relevant location until a little haptic pop is felt against the finger and a secondary menu pops up, with content varying based on where you're using the feature. A simple tap will activate one of the options on the secondary menu that pops up.

How is Haptic Touch different from 3D Touch?


3D Touch supports multiple levels of pressure, so you could have a softer press do one thing and a harder press do another thing. As an example, Apple used the multiple pressure levels for "Peek and Pop" gestures.

On a 3D Touch device, you were able "Peek" into a web link to see a preview, and then press harder to pop into it and open it up in Safari, for example. Those secondary "pop" gestures are not available with Haptic Touch because it's a single level of pressure (essentially a long press) rather than multiple pressure levels.


You can still sort of get the same functionality as Peek and Pop, but now it's more of a Peek and Tap. Just press and hold to activate a Peek with Haptic Touch and then tap the relevant section of the menu or preview that pops up.

Where does Haptic Touch work?


Haptic Touch works everywhere that 3D Touch works. You can use it on Home screen app icons to bring up Quick Actions, you can use it on links, phone numbers, addresses, and more to preview content or to activate different gestures on the iPhone or to bring up various contextual menus.


There are some notable differences in how Haptic Touch and 3D Touch behave. As an example, with 3D Touch, you could press anywhere on the keyboard to turn the iOS keyboard into a cursor. With Haptic Touch, you have to use that gesture on the space bar, which is an adjustment.

Deleting apps has also changed somewhat. Rather than pressing and holding briefly to make the apps "jiggle," a press and hold now brings up an option to "Rearrange" apps, which lets them be rearranged or deleted. You can still use the old method, but the press and hold needs to be a lot longer.

Below are some of the main things that Haptic Touch can do:

  • Activating Live Photos

  • Trackpad activation (with space bar)

  • Expand notification options

  • Activate Quick Actions on the Home screen

  • Bring up quick reply options in Messages

  • Preview links in Safari and access menu options

  • Open new tabs in Safari

  • Preview Photos and bring up menu options

  • Preview Mail messages and bring up quick actions

  • Activate the flash light on the Lock screen

  • Activate the camera on the Lock screen

  • Activate extra features in Control Center

  • Deleting apps (the new Rearrange option)


Haptic Touch essentially works across the iOS 13 operating system and in most of the Apple designed apps, along with some third-party apps. Almost all apps have extra elements that can be activated with a Haptic Touch gesture, so it's worth experimenting to figure out what's what.

Does Haptic Touch feel different?


Haptic Touch does feel different, mostly because it works a bit slower than 3D Touch gestures. Haptic Touch is a press and hold sensation, while 3D Touch is a faster press with force kind of gesture that activates quicker.

The actual haptic feedback component of Haptic Touch feels similar to the feedback received from a 3D Touch, so in that respect, it's close to indistinguishable. As mentioned, though, there's no secondary level of feedback when using Haptic Touch like there was with 3D Touch.

Why did Apple get rid of 3D Touch?


3D Touch was never available on the iPad, so Apple may have nixed it to make sure the iPhone and the iPad offer a similar experience.

With Haptic Touch and a long press on the iPad, the gestures used to get to additional contextual information like Quick Actions are the same. That was never the case with 3D Touch -- the iPad simply didn't have the extra gestures available.


3D Touch was also something of a fringe feature that was never mainstream, which could also be a reason why Apple decided to go with something that's simpler and ultimately more intuitive. One single press gesture is easier to use than a press gesture that supports multiple levels of pressure for different actions.

Where are the Haptic Touch controls?


Haptic Touch can be somewhat customized with an adjustable time that it takes to trigger Haptic Touch. You can choose between fast or slow activation, with the default setting being fast.


This feature is located in the Accessibility section of the Settings app:

  • Open up the Settings app.

  • Choose the Accessibility section.

  • Tap on "Touch."

  • Tap on "Haptic Touch."

There's an option to preview the Haptic Touch feedback options right in the Settings app. Most people are likely going to want to keep the Haptic Touch feedback set to Fast because even Fast is on the slow side compared to 3D Touch.

The Future of Haptic Touch


Now that 3D Touch has been eliminated in the 2019 iPhone lineup and many 3D Touch gestures have been tweaked to be more Haptic Touch friendly even on older iPhones, Haptic Touch seems to be the new standard.

We can expect Haptic Touch to be the new feedback feature in iPhones going forward, and it's not likely 3D Touch will be making a return.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Haptic Touch, know of a feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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Apple Releasing New iOS 13 Developer Beta Today With Deep Fusion for New iPhones

Apple will today release the first beta of an upcoming iOS 13 update, presumably iOS 13.2, which will introduce a feature that Apple promised at its iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro event: Deep Fusion.

According to The Verge, today's update is aimed at adding Deep Fusion to Apple's newest iPhones.


Deep Fusion is a new image processing system that uses the A13 Bionic and the Neural Engine. Deep Fusion takes advantage of machine learning techniques to do pixel-by-pixel processing of photos, optimizing for texture, details, and noise in each part of the image.

The feature is aimed at improving indoor photos and photos taken in medium lighting, and it's a feature that will automatically activate based on the lens being used and the light level in the room. The wide-angle lens will use Smart HDR by default for bright scenes, with Deep Fusion activating in medium or low light and Night mode activating for darker scenes.

The telephoto lens will use Deep Fusion primarily, but Smart HDR will activate instead when the lighting is very bright. Dark Mode activates when the lighting is dark. The ultra wide-angle lens uses Smart HDR only and does not support Deep Fusion (or Night mode).

The Verge has a rundown on how Deep Fusion works, with info sourced from Apple. Deep Fusion runs entirely in the background, and unlike Night mode, there's no option to toggle it on or off.

Deep Fusion is a complex process, with the hardware in the iPhone performing several actions when a photo is taken. Prior to when the shutter button is pressed, the camera captures three frames at a fast shutter speed to freeze motion. When the shutter press happens, an additional three photos are captured, and then one longer photo is taken to preserve detail.

The three regular photos and the long-exposure shot are merged into what Apple is calling a "synthetic long," which is different from Smart HDR. Deep Fusion chooses the short exposure image that has the most detail, and then merges it with the synthetic long exposure (it's just two frames that are merged).

The images are then run through a four-step processing procedure, pixel by pixel, aimed at increasing detail and providing instructions to the A13 chip on how the two images (detail, tone, color, luminance and more) should be blended together.

Taking a Deep Fusion shot takes just a bit longer than taking a normal Smart HDR image, right around a second, so Apple will initially show a proxy image if you tap over into Photos right after taking a Deep Fusion shot, though it will quickly be replaced with the full Deep Fusion image.

There are no specific details on when iOS 13.2 (and presumably iPadOS 13.2) are coming, but the update could be released any time now.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iOS 13, iPadOS, iPhone 11 Pro

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