How to Take Burst Photos on iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max

Burst Mode refers to when the camera on your iPhone captures a series of photos in rapid succession, at a rate of ten frames per second. It's a great way to shoot an action scene or an unexpected event, since you're always more likely to end up with the picture you were aiming for.

Apple has changed the way Burst Mode works in its redesigned Camera app for iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro devices. On older iPhones and on iPads, you simply tap and hold the shutter button at the bottom of the Camera interface for the duration of the scene that you're trying to capture.

However, on the iPhone 11 series you have to press the shutter button and drag it towards the square displaying the last image you shot. The shutter will stretch elastically under your finger as you do.


Notice that the counter increases in the shutter's original position for as long as you hold it down. This indicates how many shots are being captured in the current burst. Simply take your finger off the shutter when you want to end the burst of shots.

When you take a series of burst photos, they automatically appear in the Photos app under the Album name Bursts. You'll also find them in your main Photo Library. To learn how to view and select the best of your Burst photos in the Photos app, click here.




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Hands-On With the New iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro Max

It's iPhone launch day, which means the new iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max are now in the hands of customers.

We picked up a new iPhone 11 and an iPhone 11 Pro Max for an unboxing and quick first impressions overview to give MacRumors readers who are still considering a purchase or waiting on their new phone a look at the updated devices.

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Our iPhone 11 Pro Max is in midnight green, the popular new color that sold out within just a few minutes after preorders went live. Midnight green is greener on camera than it looks in real life, and in some lighting, it's quite similar to space gray.

This is the first new color Apple has introduced for its high-end iPhone in years, and it's a rather safe choice because of its subtlety. There's also a new matte finish on the Pro models, which gives them a frosted look.


Apple introduced two new iPhone 11 colors this year: purple and green. Our iPhone 11 is the purple color, which is a soft lavender shade that's quite pretty.


Unboxing the new iPhones is standard procedure and there's nothing that jumps out as new, but the iPhone 11 Pro Max (and the 11 Pro) come with a new 18W USB-C charger and a USB-C to Lightning cable instead of the traditional 5W charger.

With that new 18W cable, the iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max support fast charging right out of the box. You can charge an iPhone 11 Pro or Pro Max to 50 percent in 30 minutes. The iPhone 11, of course, supports the same fast charging, but it still ships with a 5W charger and a standard USB-A to Lightning cable.


The iPhone 11 Pro Max is heavier than the iPhone XS Max, and just a bit thicker. The extra weight isn't too noticeable, but it's worth noting that the Pro Max is Apple's heaviest iPhone to date. All that weight is attributable to a thicker, heavier battery and a major increase in battery life - the iPhone 11 Pro Max lasts 5 hours longer than the XS Max, and the 11 Pro lasts 4 hours longer than the XS.


Apple's iPhone 11 also has a longer battery life than the previous-generation iPhone XR, but it's just an hour longer because the XR already had pretty awesome battery life.

The iPhone 11 Pro Max looks similar to last year's iPhone XS Max from the front, but the back stands out because of the new triple-lens camera system and the relocated Apple logo, which is now in the center. There was some chatter that the logo was relocated for bilateral wireless charging, but that's ultimately not a feature that the iPhones launched with.


There's also a new dual-lens camera in the iPhone 11, so it too looks different from last year's iPhone XR. The new camera in both iPhones is an ultra wide-angle camera lens that lets you get super wide shots for landscapes, taking photos of architecture, and, well, anything else. It's a neat new camera feature and we're going to delve into it more in a dedicated camera video.


Perhaps the most interesting new camera feature is the new Night mode, which is designed to take crisp, clear shots in low lighting conditions using machine learning and photo aggregation techniques. We'll be testing this out later too, but so far, it looks promising.


When it comes to the display, the iPhone 11 features the same LCD display as the iPhone XR, but the Pro has a Super Retina XDR display capable of 1200 nits of peak brightness, which is going to be noticeable when it comes to HDR. It's not a big difference, though. The iPhone 11 display isn't as good as the iPhone 11 Pro's display, but it's definitely good enough for most people given the iPhone 11's much lower price point.

3D Touch is gone in all of the new iPhones this year, replaced with Haptic Touch. Haptic Touch does a lot of what 3D Touch does, but it's an adjustment because there's no pressure sensitivity.

Apple says Face ID is 30 percent faster in the new iPhones, and it does seem quicker. Face ID is also supposed to work from more angles, but it still doesn't seem to work from flat on a desk and it still needs to be pointed in the general direction of your face.

All of the new iPhone models use an updated 12-megapixel front-facing camera and there are some notable updates. You can turn the iPhone to landscape mode to capture a wider shot, which is great for group selfies, and there's a new slo-mo camera so you can capture what Apple calls "Slofies." On the iPhone 11, since there are now two cameras, Portrait mode works with all kinds of objects and not just people like it did in the XR.

Apple introduced a new A13 chip in the 2019 iPhones, but last year's iPhones were so quick that it's tough to notice a difference in performance in real-world everyday usage. When it comes to gaming, photography, and AR, though, you may see some faster speeds.

All in all, the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max aren't wildly different from last year's devices in terms of design and internal components, but the camera has received some major updates that really set these new iPhones apart from last year's models. Those who are heavily into iPhone photography might want to update, but the camera-focused update may not appeal to the average user who already has an iPhone XS, XS Max, XR, or even an iPhone X or iPhone 8.

iPhone users who have an older iPhone like a 5, 6, or 7 model will see more satisfying changes, and for these models, the $699 iPhone 11 is the most logical and cost effective update.

Did you get one of Apple's new iPhones? Let us know what you think in the comments. Stay tuned to MacRumors next week because we'll have more video coverage of the new iPhones, including a deep dive into the cameras.


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Apple Shares ‘Behind the Scenes’ Look at iPhone 11 Pro Photography

Apple today shared a new "Behind the Scenes" video highlighting how some of its iPhone 11 Pro footage used for promoting its newest devices was filmed.


The video demonstrates the photography rig used to capture Apple's professional footage, and the process that photographer Justin Bettman used to get some of the shots.
Photographer Justin Bettman creates elaborate and detailed scenes in unexpected locations. Check out the process behind the production as Justin creates a bigger picture using the triple-camera system of iPhone 11 Pro.
Photographs created by Bettman have been shared on Apple's Instagram account to highlight the iPhone 11 Pro's new triple-lens camera system with wide, ultra wide, and telephoto lenses.


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Just Upgraded to iOS 13? Start with These 8 Tips

Apple today released iOS 13, the newest version of the software that's designed to run on the iPhone. Apple's yearly software updates always bring long lists of new features and changes that can make your iPhone feel like a foreign device.

New updates can be intimidating, but installing them is often worthwhile because Apple's updates make sure your devices are safe, up to date, and have the latest feature improvements.

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If you're worried about performance taking a hit on older devices, rest assured that Apple has made an effort in both iOS 12 and iOS 13 to make older devices more efficient. In iOS 13, Face ID is faster, apps launch up to twice as fast, and are, in general smaller in size for quicker downloads and updates.

We're going to jump start you with the what you need to know to get up and running with iOS 13 right away.

1. Try Out Dark Mode


Your iPhone isn't going to look too much different when you install iOS 13, with one exception - a new dark theme that's available if you enable it. Apple will ask you if you want to turn on Dark Mode when you first update your iPhone to iOS 13, and if you do opt to turn it on, prepare for everything from apps to the Home screen to shift to a darker shade.


Dark Mode is one of those features that iOS users have wanted for ages, and it's great if you have eyes sensitive to light or want a darker theme for your apps at night. Most Apple apps, like Mail, Messages, Health, Reminders, the App Store, Apple Music, and more have dark themes that activate whenever you turn on Dark Mode, and third-party developers are also able to develop darker themes to swap to when Dark Mode is activated.

You can turn Dark Mode on permanently, toggle it on when you need it, or set it to come on at a set schedule, such as sunset to sunrise, all of which can be controlled via Settings or the Control Center. The opposite of Dark Mode is Light Mode, which is the same old mode that's been available on your iPhone for years, so that's an option too if you don't like the darker display.


For more on Dark Mode, including how to access it and how it looks, make sure to check out our Dark Mode guide.

2. Learn These New Gestures


Some of the gestures on your iPhone (and iPad) are a little bit different in iOS 13, but they're easy to adjust to. Here's a quick list of what's been tweaked:

  • Scrolling - Just grab the scroll bar and drag it upwards or downwards to get where you want to go instead of swiping.

  • Selecting Text - Drag a finger right over text to select it. Double tap to select a word, triple tap to select an entire sentence, and quadruple tap to select a paragraph.

  • Cursor Movement - To move the cursor when writing a note or an email, just stick your finger on it and drag it wherever you want it to go.

  • Cut, Copy, and Paste - Pinch up with three fingers to copy, pinch up with fingers two times to cut, and pinch down with three fingers to paste.

  • Undo/Redo - To undo and redo, swipe with three fingers to the left or the right.

  • Selecting Multiples - To select multiple items, like messages, files, or folders, tap with two fingers and then drag.



Can't remember all these? If you tap and hold with three fingers, an edit bar appears with undo, redo, cut, copy, and paste.

Bonus for iPhone XR and iPad owners: 3D Touch functionality is available in the form of Haptic Touch or a long press (on the iPad). Just long press where supported. It's available almost everywhere 3D Touch was available. New iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro users will also need to get used to Haptic Touch instead of 3D Touch.

3. Go Configure These Settings



  • Silence Unknown Callers
  • Automatic Safari Tab Closing
  • Optimize Battery Charging
  • Location controls for Shared Images


4. Set Up a Messages Profile


When you open up Messages for the first time after installing iOS 13, it's going to prompt you to set up your profile. Your profile is basically just a name and a photo that's shared with people when you converse with them.


Your profile can be customized with an image you took, an Animoji, or just a letter, and you can choose to share it with your contacts, everyone, or no one at all.

For more on Messages, make sure to check out our Messages guide.

5. Try Swiping Instead of Typing


iOS 13 has a new "QuickPath" keyboard, which is Apple's fancy way of saying that it's added swipe gestures for typing. You can now slide to type, dragging your fingers over letters instead of picking them up to type as you normally do.


If you've ever used a swipe-based keyboard, this is the same thing. Just swipe from letter to letter to form words. If you hate it, don't worry, you can still tap, or use swipes and taps interchangeably.

6. Memoji/Animoji Stickers for Everyone


Memoji and Animoji have been available on all devices with a Face ID camera, but in iOS 13, Animoji and Memoji are expanding to stickers that everyone can use.


There's a new Animoji Stickers app in the app drawer in Messages, where you can choose from already-available Animoji characters in a variety of poses or create new Memoji stickers that look just like you.

Animoji and Memoji stickers are available on all iOS devices that run iOS 13 and work like all other stickers so you can send them to people in Messages. You can also access your Animoji/Memoji stickers in other apps through the "Recently Used" menu.

Learn how to create and use Animoji/Memoji stickers in our how to.

7. Edit Videos in the New Photos App


When you open up the Photos app for the first time, it's going to look a bit different. There are new Years, Months, and Days organizational options you can tap in the main Photos tab.


Apple's aim with these new sections is to help you find your best photos so you can relive your memories whenever you want.

Editing photos looks different too, but all of the options you're used to are there, with some new editing tools to make your photos look better than ever. You can also edit videos for the first time ever, which is a fun new addition to iOS 13. It works just like editing photos, so it's a simple and quick way to trim down video footage or add cool effects.

For more on what's new in the Photos app and how to use all of the new features, make sure to check out our Photos guide.

8. Look Around in Maps


Maps in iOS 13 more or less looks the same, but Apple has continued to expand its redesigned Maps interface with more detail, so you may notice some changes right when you open the app.


One neat new feature you might want to check out is the "Look Around" option, which is Apple's equivalent to Google Street View. Look Around lets you get a street level look at what's around you or what you search for, which is great for scoping out restaurants, shopping, and more.

Maps has other neat features like lists of Collections and Favorites, and when Siri gives directions, you'll notice that they're much more natural. Siri will say things like "turn left at the next stoplight" instead of "turn left in 500 feet."

If you want to know about everything new in Maps, make sure to check out our Maps guide.

Compatible Devices


You can install iOS 13 if you have an iPhone SE, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone X, iPhone XR, iPhone XS Max, or iPhone XS (and it'll come pre-installed on the new 2019 iPhones). It's not compatible with the iPhone 6 and earlier, so if you have an older iPhone, you'll need to stick with iOS 12 (or earlier).

If you have an iPad, you need to know that instead of iOS, it's going to run iPadOS going forward. Don't worry, though, iPadOS is pretty much identical to iOS 13 and offers all of the same features, with a few other changes designed specifically for the larger screen of the iPad.

For iPads, the new iOS works on iPad Air 2, iPad Air (3rd Gen), iPad mini 4, iPad mini 5, iPad (5th-7th Gen), and any iPad Pro.

If you do have an iPad and want to know more about iPadOS, you'll find details in our iPadOS roundup.

Learn More about iOS 13


We have a lot more information on every new feature in iOS 13, large and small. If you want to learn more about what's new and what you can expect when installing iOS 13, we recommend reading our full iOS 13 roundup.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about the new features in iOS 13 or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.


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Vintage Prototype Macintosh Portable M5120 Shown Off in New Photos

It's always interesting to get a look back at Apple's past, especially when it comes to prototype devices that were never actually released to the public, so we thought we'd share some photos of a restored Macintosh Portable M5120, sent to us by Sonny Dickson.


Unlike the launch version of the Macintosh Portable, which was sold in the late 1980s in a beige color, this model is a prototype made from a clear plastic material. It's been restored and it is one of only six that are known to exist.


When it was released, the Macintosh Portable was priced at $7,300 and it was the first Mac powered by a battery. Despite the name, the Macintosh Portable weighed in at a whopping 16 pounds, but it was still more transportable than standard computers of the era.


There are no screws in the Macintosh Portable and it was designed to be taken apart with just the hands, a feat not possible with current laptop computers. It featured a 9.8-inch black and white active matrix LCD display, 9MB SRAM, a 1.44MB floppy disk drive, a typewriter-style keyboard, and a trackball setup that allowed the trackball to be positioned at either the left or the right.


A hinged design let the display be closed up over the keyboard when not in use, reminiscent of more modern laptop designs, and there's a built-in handle. The battery inside was a lead-acid battery, which, when the machines were launched, was able to last for approximately 8 to 10 hours.


Apple sold the Macintosh Portable alongside the Apple IIci, and it never really caught on due to its high price tag. After launching it in 1989, Apple made one followup version, the Macintosh Portable M5126, but it was discontinued just six months later, with Apple nixing the Portable line entirely in 1991.


After the Macintosh Portable was discontinued, Apple moved on to the PowerBook, which came out later that year.


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Google Expected to Unveil New Pixel 4 Smartphone at October 15 Event

Google is hosting an October 15 event in New York City, where it is expected to unveil its next-generation smartphone, the Google Pixel 4, reports Axios.

Like Apple's newest iPhones, the Google Pixel 4 will feature a square-shaped rear camera bump, which Google itself confirmed.


Ahead of the Pixel 4 launch, there were multiple leaks, so Google shared its own images of the upcoming device and also highlighted some of the smartphone's new features.

Rumors suggest Google's rear camera setup will include two lenses, a microphone, a flash, and a "spectral sensor" that's designed to account for light flicker when filming an LCD display.

Apple's iPhone camera setup positions three lenses in a triangle shape in the iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max, and two lenses vertically in the iPhone 11. Google's setup has the two lenses of the Pixel 4 arranged horizontally with the flash located at the bottom.

Google has already highlighted some of the other features coming to the Pixel 4, including a new Face Unlock feature that is equivalent to Face ID, using 3D facial scans.


Unlike prior implementation of facial recognition on Android devices, Google's version will support secure payments and app authentication. Google claims its facial recognition system will be a more fluid experience than Apple's, working in any orientation.


Google's facial recognition feature will also enable motion-based gestures called Motion Sense, allowing users to do things like skip songs, snooze alarms, and silence phone calls by waving a hand in front of the phone.

Google's Pixel 4 smartphone will be a major iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max competitor alongside Samsung's new Galaxy Note 10.


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Apple Stops Signing iOS 12.4, Downgrading From iOS 12.4.1 No Longer Possible

Following the release of iOS 12.4.1 on August 26, Apple has stopped signing iOS 12.4, the previous version of iOS that was available to consumers.

iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch owners who have upgraded to iOS 12.4.1 will no longer be able to downgrade to iOS 12.4.

Apple routinely stops signing older versions of software updates after new releases come out in order to encourage customers to keep their operating systems up to date, but iOS 12.4.1 was released because iOS 12.4 had a major vulnerability.

The vulnerability allowed hackers to create a jailbreak for iOS 12.4 and left devices vulnerable to hacking attempts. Apple fixed the bug in iOS 12.4.1, and the iOS 12.4 jailbreak will not work after upgrading.

iOS 12.4.1 is now the only version of iOS that can be installed on iPhones and iPads, but developers and public beta testers can download iOS 13, an upcoming update that's currently being beta tested and is set to be released next week.


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Apple Adds Now-Discontinued iPhone 7 Models to Clearance Site

Following the launch of the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max, Apple has discontinued the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

Remaining iPhone 7 and 7 Plus stock has been listed on Apple's clearance site, where the models will be available at a discounted price until leftover supplies are exhausted.


The iPhone 7 and 7 Plus are available for all carriers and in unlocked versions in both 32 and 128GB capacities. The iPhone 7 starts at $399 for 32GB of storage, while the iPhone 7 Plus starts at $499 for 128GB of storage.

At this time, jet black is the only available color, but Apple may add additional models to the site in the future.

At a starting price of $399, the iPhone 7 is not much more affordable than the iPhone 8, which Apple is continuing to sell at a lower price. The iPhone 8 is priced at $449 for 64GB of storage, while iPhone 8 Plus pricing starts at $549.

Apple's iPhone lineup now includes the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max, iPhone XR, iPhone 8, and iPhone 8 Plus.


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Apple Stops Selling iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus and Apple Watch Series 4 Models

Coinciding with the launch of the new iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max, Apple has reshuffled its iPhone lineup, discontinuing the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The devices will likely remain available for purchase for lower prices from select resellers around the world for the foreseeable future.


Likewise, with the introduction of the Apple Watch Series 5, Apple has stopped selling Apple Watch Series 4 models. Apple Watch Series 3 models remain available, and pricing for those now starts at a reduced $199.


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Apple Online Store Back Up, Pre-Orders Launch for Apple Watch Series 5 and 7th-Generation iPad

Apple's online store is back up and Apple has begun accepting pre-orders for the new 10.2-inch 7th-generation iPad and the Apple Watch Series 5.


The new 10.2-inch iPad is similar to the 9.7-inch iPad, but with a bigger display and a faster A10 Fusion chip. It comes in silver, space gray, and gold, with pricing that starts at $329.

Apple Watch Series 5 models feature an always-on display, a new Compass app and compass features for navigation improvements, and international emergency calling.

Apple Watch Series 5 models are available in aluminum, stainless steel, titanium, and ceramic, with pricing starting at $399 for the aluminum GPS models and $499 for the aluminum LTE models. Stainless steel models are priced starting at $699, titanium models are priced starting at $799, and ceramic models are priced starting at $899. You can choose to pair an Apple Watch body with whichever band you like thanks to Apple's new "Apple Watch Studio."

Pre-orders are starting today, with the new devices set to ship out to customers on their official launch date, Friday, September 20.

Apple is continuing to sell the Apple Watch Series 3 priced starting at $199. The Apple Watch Series 4 has been discontinued.

iPhone models won't be available for pre-order today, with Apple accepting preorders for the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max on September 13 at 5:00 a.m. Pacific Time or 8:00 a.m. Eastern Time.


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