Kuo: 2019 iPhones and New iPad Pro Models in Late 2019 to Early 2020 to Adopt New Antenna Technology

Apple plans to use modified-PI (MPI) material for most antennas in 2019 iPhones, rather than the liquid crystal polymer (LCP) material used for the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, and iPhone XR antennas, according to the latest research note from reputable analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, obtained by MacRumors.


Kuo believes that LCP limits the RF performance of the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, and iPhone XR antennas due to current technology limitations and production issues. This puts the RF performance of MPI material at least on par with LCP, despite MPI being easier and cheaper to produce.

While switching to MPI material for 2019 iPhone antennas appears to be a no-brainer decision for Apple, Kuo expects that LCP will still be the primary material for 5G antennas in 2020 iPhones, as he believes that the production issues limiting the RF performance of LCP will be resolved by then.

In today's note, Kuo also said he expects Apple to use LCP material in future iPad models, starting from the late fourth quarter of 2019.


In a separate research note last month, which has only been seen by Taiwanese media so far, Kuo said two new iPad Pro models with the same 11-inch and 12.9-inch screen sizes as the current models will enter mass production between the fourth quarter of 2019 and the first quarter of 2020.

Kuo said those new iPad Pro models will feature flexible circuit boards using LCP, but we've yet to receive that research note in English, so we cannot confirm any further details at this time.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, 2019 iPhones

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Apple Rumored to Add USB Mouse Support to iPad Pro as Accessibility Feature

On the latest episode of the Connected podcast on Relay FM, MacStories editor-in-chief Federico Viticci suggested that USB mouse support could eventually be coming to the iPad Pro as an accessibility feature.


"What I heard is without adapters, you will be able to use any USB mouse on your iPad, but as an accessibility device," said Viticci. "The iPad Pro has a USB-C port, so just plug in a USB mouse and if you have physical impairments, if you have any other kinds of motor impairments, just use a USB mouse in accessibility mode."

It has long been possible to use a compatible adaptive accessory like a joystick or trackball with Apple's accessibility feature AssistiveTouch to control an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, but USB mouse support would seemingly eliminate the need for any specialized hardware or adapters.

Viticci cautions that this is something that he "heard months ago" and that he doesn't "know if it'll happen," but well-known developer Steve Troughton-Smith tweeted that "as far as I'm aware, that is indeed in the works."


As noted by Viticci, this wouldn't be the first time Apple enables a feature "under the catch-all umbrella of accessibility." Any user would presumably be able to toggle on USB mouse support in the Settings app, with Troughton-Smith adding that "I feel like every pro user will turn that on, day one."

In a follow-up tweet, Troughton-Smith speculated that iOS could perhaps have "a small circle or dot" for a cursor rather than a traditional pointer, but the exact implementation of mouse support if any remains to be seen.

No specific timeframe has been provided for USB mouse support on the iPad, but it could presumably be added as early as iOS 13, which is expected to be unveiled at Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June. The software update should be publicly released in September alongside new iPhones.

Listen to Connected on Relay FM. Viticci's remarks about the potential for USB mouse support on the iPad begin at the 1:08:35 mark.

Via: iDownloadBlog

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Apple Shares New Videos Highlighting What iPad Pro Can Do

Apple today uploaded six new videos focused on showing off iPad Pro features, continuing on with its "What You Can Do With iPad" series promoting the new 11 and 12.9-inch tablets.

Most of the videos are over a minute long and feature different iPad Pro apps, features, and capabilities, ranging from handwriting a note with Apple Pencil to creating music.







Multitasking with multiple windows, making notes with Apple Pencil, browsing the web, using Maps, watching videos, reading with the Books app, annotating photos, using drag and drop, video editing, typing with both the on-screen keyboard and the Smart Keyboard Folio, and making music with GarageBand are all shown off in the video.

Apple also highlights charging the iPhone with the iPad Pro, shooting in 4K, plugging in USB-C accessories, and Group FaceTime.

Several third-party apps are shown off in the videos, such as LumaFusion, Animation Desk, NBA 2K, Felt, Notability, Trello, Calm, Procreate, Affinity Designer, Impress, Universe, and more.

All of Apple's videos link to a "Look what you can do with iPad Pro" website that first launched in January. Apple says that all of the videos were filmed with the iPad Pro, as were the previous videos in the series.

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Apple’s Smart Keyboard Folio vs. Third-Party Alternatives

Apple designed a Smart Keyboard Folio for the 11- and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models, but while it's super slim, it's also expensive and with flat keys that some iPad users might not like.

Luckily, third-party companies like Zagg and Logitech have come out with some alternate iPad Pro keyboards, and in today's video, we're comparing the Smart Keyboard Folio from Apple to two popular alternatives - the Slim Folio Pro from Logitech and the Slim Book Go from Zagg.

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We tested keyboards for the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, but both Logitech and Zagg make variants for both iPad Pro models. Zagg's Slim Book Go is priced at $99 for the 11-inch model and $130 for the 12.9-inch model, while the Slim Folio Pro from Logitech is priced at $120 for the 11-inch model and $130 for the 12.9-inch model.

Both third-party keyboard options are cheaper than the Smart Keyboard Folio from Apple, which costs $179 for the 11-inch iPad Pro and $199 for the 12.9-inch model, so you can save a decent amount of cash with a third-party option.

Apple's Smart Keyboard Folio is super slim and adds a minimal amount of bulk to the iPad Pro, and that thin profile is a feature that Logitech and Zagg haven't been able to match. The Slim Folio Pro and the Slim Book Go both add a considerable amount of bulk to the iPad Pro, doubling the weight of the device and making it a good deal thicker.

Zagg Slim Book Go

Of the two, the Slim Book Go from Zagg is the heftier model, but both are pretty bulky. If you're someone who prefers a device without a thick case on it, these keyboards may not be for you. There are, however, some benefits to these cases beyond price, such as the feel of the keyboard.

The Smart Keyboard Folio from Apple has flat, fabric covered keys that have little travel and don't feel much like a standard keyboard. Zagg and Logitech's solutions, though, are thicker and thus accommodate keys with more travel, a more satisfying press, and just a better overall feel.

The Slim Book Go from Zagg is designed to protect the entire iPad Pro, providing solid drop protection. The case itself is made from a hard plastic, while the keyboard has a cloth feel on the front and felt material surrounding the keys.

Zagg Slim Book Go

You can detach the keyboard cover from the case if you want, leaving just the case itself on the iPad. Zagg left a lot of space at the bottom of the keyboard on the Slim Book Go, so it's comfortable to rest your wrists, but when using it on your lap, it's wobbly.

That's not a problem in a situation where you're using it on a desk, and with the adjustable stand there are multiple viewing angles, something you don't get with Logitech's version. The keyboard is pleasant to type on, but there's no backlighting for the keys. It's not clear why, but there's no sleep/wake function in the cover, so shutting it won't turn off your iPad. Multi-device support is included, something not available in the Slim Folio Pro.

Logitech Slim Folio Pro

Logitech's Slim Folio Pro, unlike the Slim Book Go, is all one piece without a detachable keyboard option. It has a thick rubber frame that protects the iPad, and a single viewing angle for using while typing.

The Slim Folio Pro and the Slim Book Go both offer a better typing experience than the Smart Keyboard Folio for those who like more traditional keys, but we preferred the feel of the Slim Book Go a bit more because the keys have more travel and a more satisfying click. On the plus side, it's a bit less bulky and not as heavy, and it has backlit keys, a nice bonus feature.

Logitech Slim Folio Pro

Both the Slim Book Go and the Slim Folio Pro connect to the iPad Pro using Bluetooth, making the Smart Keyboard Folio the only keyboard accessory that uses the Smart Connector on the new iPad Pro models. Bluetooth isn't as convenient as the Smart Connector, but these keyboards don't need to be charged often and when they do, you can use USB-C.

So which should you choose? If you hate bulk, get the Smart Keyboard Folio or plan to remove these keyboard cases when not in use, something that can be a hassle.

If you want the best typing experience that's closest to a laptop and don't mind the thickness, choose the Zagg, but if you want something a bit slimmer with backlighting and more stability for on-lap use, choose the Logitech (and make sure to check out our full review). You can, of course, choose none of the above and opt for a much cheaper standalone Bluetooth keyboard.

Which iPad Pro keyboard do you prefer? Apple's, Logitech's, Zagg's, or something else? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Growing Number of iPad Pro Owners Complain of Screen Stuttering Issues

Some iPad Pro owners who have 2017 and 2018 models have increasingly been running into issues with screen stuttering, based on a slew of threads on the Apple Support communities and the MacRumors forums.

Affected users have iPad Pro models that sometimes refuse to register touch gestures, stutter when scrolling, miss keystrokes, and have other similar issues. We here at MacRumors have not been able to replicate this issue, but the sheer number of complaints suggests something may be going on with the iPad Pro's display.


MacRumors reader Flasch describes the issue he had with his iPad Pro right out of the box:
I bought a new 12.9" iPad pro on the first available day last Wednesday. The o, k, and to a lesser extent i and j keys on the on-screen software keyboard consistently recognized touch with a click and change in colour of the key but the letter would often not appear in any program. For o in particular, it often required several attempts to make the letter register.

Spent time on the phone with apple and they didn't have a solution. A full restore to factory settings didn't help.

I returned it to the store today and picked up a new 12.9" iPad pro. Brought it home and this one is worse. Ofter 5 or more presses of o or k to get it to register. When the iPad is turned clockwise to landscape mode, the q and w are then in the same region of the device and they don't work either. Seven presses of the q before a letter appeared on the screen. It seems the bottom right of the touchscreen has an issue.
Other iPad Pro users are having the same issue with touchscreen unresponsiveness, which can also impact scrolling and general usage. From MacRumors reader Codeseven:
Newest 12.9'" iPad Pro, 1 TB/6 Gb model running iOS 12.1.3., no Screen Protector applied. Seems to occur on all areas of the screen.

Screen freezes. Started cropping up just in the last few weeks, seems to be getting worse. Reacts as though the screen was very dirty or my finger isn't contacting then screen completely. Interestingly, the freeze will sometimes stop when the iPad is changed from any angle to level. Also, sometimes if allot of finger pressure is used then the freeze is gone.
The problem appears to be primarily impacting new 2018 iPad Pro models, though there have also been complaints from some 2016 and 2017 iPad Pro owners.

A video demonstrating the stuttering issue

MacRumors reader Roger, who let us know about the issue, says that after approximately a month, his 2018 iPad Pro had issues with scrolling and wouldn't register input. He was able to get a replacement, as were many other customers who have experienced this issue, but he said that the replacement model has also been exhibiting the same issues.

It's not clear if this is a software or a hardware issue, and there are certainly many 2017 and 2018 iPad Pro models out there that have no problems like this at all, which makes it difficult to determine what's going on. Some of the issues with the 2017 model appear to have started with the release of iOS 11.3, but have persisted through software updates. Many users who are running iOS 12.2 are still reporting problems.

Some users have noticed that the stuttering problem goes away on the 2018 models when the Apple Pencil 2 is attached to the iPad, perhaps suggestive of an Apple Pencil-related connectivity issue.

On the whole, though, it's not clear what's causing issues for iPad Pro owners who are having touchscreen responsiveness problems. Anyone with an unresponsive touchscreen should bring it into an Apple Store or an Apple Authorized Repair Shop for service as some users have been able to get replacement units.

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Picking the Best iPad to Buy in 2019

In March 2019, Apple updated its iPad lineup with two new tablets: the fifth-generation iPad mini and the 10.5-inch iPad Air. These models are now part of Apple's full iPad line, also including the 9.7-inch iPad, 11-inch iPad Pro, and 12.9-inch iPad Pro to make five models total.

iPad Comparison



Which iPad is right for you?


If price is your biggest consideration, you'll want to look at the basic 9.7-inch iPad, knowing it has older technology in it. If you're looking for portability, check out the iPad mini, and if you want a mid-sized iPad with a bit more to offer than the entry-level iPad, check out the new iPad Air.

What about the iPad Pro? Apple's high-end iPads are in a class by themselves, and it shows in the price. Unless you're a pro-level user or cost is no object, you'll probably want to look to cheaper options, but the iPad Pro models deliver cutting-edge technology for those who need it.

With that quick overview out of the way, let's take a look at what each model has to offer.

iPad Models


9.7-inch iPad


Starting at the low end of the iPad price spectrum, Apple has the basic 9.7-inch iPad starting at $329 for the Wi-Fi only model. This iPad is perfect if you're on a budget as it's also frequently on sale, and is popular in the education field.

It has the most important features users are looking for in an iPad, like a generous display, Touch ID, and a decent rear camera, as well as support for the first-generation Apple Pencil if you're into drawing, handwritten notes, and other tasks that don't work quite as well with your finger.

iPad Comparison Chart
That low-end price tag does mean there are a few sacrifices, however, as the front FaceTime camera is relatively low resolution compared to other iPads and the display is a definite step down as it lacks rich wide color support, True Tone technology that automatically adjusts overall tone based on ambient light, and an antireflective coating that helps minimize glare on other models. The display also isn't laminated to the cover glass, so you'll notice a bit of an air gap rather than feeling like you're directly touching the screen.

Key specifications include:
  • A 9.7‑inch Retina display

  • Home button with Touch ID

  • A10 Fusion chip

  • 8MP back camera with HDR and 1080p HD video

  • 1.2MP FaceTime HD front camera with HDR

  • Compatible with first-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Bluetooth keyboards

  • Lightning port

  • Colors include: silver, space gray, and gold

iPad mini


Next up is the newly-updated iPad mini, which starts at $399 for Wi-Fi only models. Apple's refresh of this smaller-sized tablet improved its internals and introduced support for the first-generation Apple Pencil, making it a capable mid-range tablet with ultra portability.

With a display size of 7.9 inches, you can't quite call it pocketable, but the iPad mini is definitely great for having something small on the go that still offers a much larger screen size than even Apple's largest iPhones.


Looking beyond the display size, this is a very capable device using the same A12 Bionic chip from Apple's latest iPhones, so it's a speedy tablet. You'll get an improved display compared to the entry-level iPad, a much better front FaceTime camera, and support for the first-generation Apple Pencil.

Key specifications include:
  • Fully laminated 7.9‑inch Retina display with True Tone

  • Touch ID

  • A12 Bionic chip with Neural Engine

  • 8MP back camera with HDR and 1080p HD video

  • 7MP FaceTime HD front camera with Auto HDR

  • Compatible with first-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Bluetooth keyboards

  • Lightning port

  • Colors include: silver, space gray, and gold

10.5-inch iPad Air


In the middle of the iPad family now sits the 10.5-inch iPad Air, starting at $499 for Wi-Fi only models. Apple's brand-new iPad Air is now the perfect mid-tier option with a nice screen size, speedier internals, and first-generation Apple Pencil support.

The iPad Air and iPad mini have nearly identical specs aside from the display size, so size is likely going to be the most significant factor if you're deciding between the two.


The only other significant difference is that the iPad Air has a Smart Connector for easy connection to a Smart Keyboard accessory if you prefer a hardware keyboard for your iPad. The iPad mini's smaller size means it doesn't support a Smart Keyboard, although you can still pair a Bluetooth keyboard with it if you like.

Key specifications include:
  • Fully laminated 10.5‑inch Retina display with True Tone

  • Touch ID

  • A12 Bionic chip with Neural Engine

  • 8MP back camera with HDR and 1080p HD video

  • 7MP FaceTime HD front camera with Auto HDR

  • Compatible with first-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Smart Keyboard and Bluetooth keyboards

  • Lightning port

  • Colors include: silver, space gray, and gold

iPad Pro


If you're looking for true portable workstation power, then the last two iPads in the lineup -- the iPad Pro models -- could be what you're interested in. These tablets were updated in late 2018 with Face ID and a near bezel-less design that mirrors the look of the iPhone X family.

These iPads, which start at $799 for the smaller 11-inch model and $999 for the 12.9-inch model, are a step up from the iPad Air in almost every way, from an improved "Liquid Retina" display with rounded corners and ProMotion technology for smoother display performance to a more powerful A12X chip and a better 12-megapixel rear camera with flash. You'll also get support for the second-generation Apple Pencil, which magnetically attaches to the iPad Pro and charges wirelessly.


To be honest, the iPad Pro is overkill for most mainstream users, but if you're a pro-level user or just want the latest technology, the iPad Pro has a lot to offer.

The main difference between the two iPad Pros is their screen sizes, so the following key specifications are for both models:
  • 11‑inch and 12.9-inch Liquid Retina displays with ProMotion technology and True Tone

  • Face ID

  • A12X Bionic chip with Neural Engine

  • 12MP back camera with Smart HDR and 4K video at 30 fps or 60 fps

  • 7MP TrueDepth front camera with Portrait mode, Portrait Lighting, and Smart HDR

  • Compatible with second-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Smart Keyboard Folio and Bluetooth keyboards

  • USB-C connector instead of Lightning

  • Colors include: silver and space gray

Customization Options


Now that we've looked at the base specs of each of iPad models, it's time to think about various options like storage, cellular connectivity, and AppleCare+.

Storage: There are several storage options for each iPad, so think about how much you might need. On the low end, the 9.7-inch iPad is available in two sizes not seen anywhere else in the iPad family: 32GB ($329) and 128GB ($100 upgrade at $429).

For the just-released iPad mini and iPad Air, Apple is offering two storage options: 64GB ($399 for mini and $499 for Air) and 256GB (a $150 upgrade on the previous prices).


Lastly, the iPad Pro has the most storage capacity options. You can choose from the base 64GB option ($799 for 11-inch and $999 for 12.9-inch), or 256GB ($150 upgrade from base), 512GB ($350 upgrade from base), and 1TB ($750 upgrade from base).

Power-heavy users should always look to the higher-capacity iPad models to ensure they don't have to worry about constantly deleting apps and other files for storage space. Otherwise, Apple's iCloud is a great way to offload files and lets you opt for a cheaper iPad with less storage.

Unless you're storing a large local music library, downloading lots of video for offline playback, have a ton of huge apps, or doing pro-level work requiring lots of large files, mainstream users can usually get away with the lowest-tier storage options.

Cellular Connectivity: If you need to ensure that you can use your iPad at any time, including when you're not near a Wi-Fi connection, you can opt for a Wi-Fi + Cellular option to ensure you're always connected.

Cellular support adds $130–$150 onto the price of all corresponding Wi-Fi iPad models, depending on which iPad and which storage capacity. You'll also have to sign up for a data plan for an additional cost with a supported carrier, like AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon in the United States.

All told, it's not a cheap upgrade, and many users prefer using their phone as a hotspot to deliver connectivity to a Wi-Fi iPad while on the go. But if you're phone plan doesn't allow for hotspot usage or you just want the convenience of having your iPad connected directly to a cellular network at all times, the option is there.

AppleCare+: New iPads come with one year of hardware repair coverage through Apple's limited warranty policy, as well as up to 90 days of complimentary support. But if you want more coverage, Apple offers optional AppleCare+ packages priced at $69 for the 9.7-inch iPad, iPad mini, and iPad Air or $129 for the iPad Pro.

AppleCare+ extends your iPad's coverage to two years from the purchase date and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, subject to a service fee of $49 plus applicable taxes in the United States. Prices vary elsewhere.


iPad AppleCare+ plans also cover accidental damage to the Apple Pencil for up to two years with a $29 fee plus tax per incident. AppleCare+ provides 24/7 priority access to support advisors via online chat or phone for up to two years after the iPad's original purchase date.

Apple charges high fees for accidental damage to a new iPad without AppleCare+, so as with most forms of insurance, the plan can pay for itself if ever used. AppleCare+ must be added within 60 days of purchasing a device.

Accessories


Each iPad has a plethora of accessories to choose from for protection, style, or usability, many of which Apple creates and sells itself on Apple.com and in Apple retail stores.

Apple Pencil: The Apple Pencil is a stylus most popular with artists but also used by others, providing a comfortable and streamlined way to interact with the tablet. The second-generation Apple Pencil introduced sleek design changes, magnetic charging on iPad Pro, and gesture controls, none of which are available on the original Apple Pencil.


It might be unclear which iPads support which Apple Pencil models, but with the new iPad mini and iPad Air it's become a bit simpler. In short, the iPad Pro uses the second-generation Apple Pencil while all other iPad models work with the first-generation Apple Pencil.

- First-Generation Apple Pencil ($100): 9.7-inch iPad (2018), fifth-generation iPad mini (2019), 10.5-inch iPad Air (2019)
- Second-Generation Apple Pencil ($130): 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro (2018)

In the end, if you're only looking to purchase an iPad as a convenient app-browsing, email-checking, or FaceTime device, you don't need an Apple Pencil. But if you're an artist or other creative with a penchant for drawing or taking digital handwritten notes, Apple's stylus is definitely an enhancement to the iPad experience.

For a more in-depth look at the differences between the two Apple Pencils, check out our comparison.

Cases: Apple sells Smart Cover and Smart Folio cases for all of its iPads, priced depending on the size of the device. You'll pay $39.00 for a 9.7-inch iPad Smart Cover, $39.00 for an iPad mini Smart Cover, $49.00 for an iPad Air Smart Cover, $79.00 for an 11-inch iPad Pro Smart Folio, and $99.00 for a 12.9-inch iPad Pro Smart Folio.


These cases magnetically attach to your iPad, offering a degree of protection while also allowing you to place the tablet in numerous angled positions. The difference between the two is that the iPad Pro's Smart Folio cases protect the rear of the tablet as well as the front, while the Smart Cover cases only protect the front.

Keyboards: If you're looking to do a lot of work on an iPad Pro, Apple also sells the Smart Keyboard Folio at $179.00 for the 11-inch model and $199.00 for the 12.9-inch model. This case is just like the Smart Folio, with an added Bluetooth keyboard for enhanced productivity. A similar accessory is available for the 10.5-inch iPad Air.


These Apple-made cases are compatible with iPads that have a Smart Keyboard connector, which is a special port that magnetically attaches the keyboard to the side of the iPad.

Otherwise, you can also look into popular iPad keyboard manufacturers like Brydge, Logitech, and Belkin, all of which sell Bluetooth keyboards that connect to iPads wirelessly. Keyboard cases are more expensive than your average case due to the added input use, but if you really plan on doing a lot of work and writing on your iPad, the two-in-one keyboard/protection combo is the way to go. The hardware keyboards give a much better typing experience and free up screen space on your iPad by getting rid of the software keyboard.

Cables: Apple's iPad lineup now has differing cable standard, making matters a bit confusing. The easy way to remember is that if you're purchasing anything that's not an iPad Pro, you'll be charging the iPad with a regular Apple Lightning cable.


If you're going with an iPad Pro, then you'll be using USB-C cables. All iPads come with their required cables in the box, but if you don't have many around the house it's always a good idea to stock up on more. Apple sells individual cables, but you can always shop around on Amazon for cheap and reliable brands like Anker, Aukey, and RAVPower.

So... Which iPad Should You Buy?


Overall, Apple's brand-new 10.5-inch iPad Air is a perfect all-encompassing tablet that should hit the check marks for many buyers. You can do everything from quickly browsing Twitter and checking emails to getting a few hours of work done with a paired keyboard, which isn't bad for the $499 starting price.

If you're someone who has preferred the 7.9-inch form factor of the iPad mini over the years, Apple's latest small-sized tablet is well worth the update and has nearly all of the features of the new iPad Air. The iPad mini doesn't have a Smart Keyboard connector like the iPad Air or a Smart Keyboard case of its own, but since the iPad mini isn't exactly a workstation device, that's not a bad trade-off (plus, you can still connect it to a Bluetooth keyboard if you want).

For $100 less than the iPad Air at $399 (64GB Wi-Fi), you'll still have a nice laminated display with True Tone and antireflective coating, Touch ID, the speedy A12 Bionic chip, first-generation Apple Pencil support, and the same cameras, all in an ultra-portable 7.9-inch tablet.


If you're shopping around for a cheap tablet for a kid, definitely consider Apple's 9.7-inch iPad, which sees discounts below its $329 price tag pretty often. Sale prices in the $230–$250 range are not unheard of, and pairing the iPad with a super-rugged child-proof case is a perfect birthday or holiday present. Frugal shoppers should also check out Apple's refurbished store to shop around for older-model iPads offered at discount.

And, of course, on the other end are the power users. If you're willing to spend the money to spec-out a 12.9-inch iPad Pro, you'll get a super reliable mobile workstation with 10-hour battery life in a 1.4 lb package. If you travel frequently for work, or just like setting up at a coffee shop during the day, the iPad Pro has a chance to become your MacBook replacement with a paired keyboard.

The most recent additions to Apple's iPad lineup provides a wide variety of options and offers clear distinctions between tablets that should help make your decision a little easier.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPad mini 5, iPad, iPad Air

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Apple Requiring New and Updated Apps to Support iPhone XS Max and 12.9-Inch iPad Pro Starting March 27

Apple today announced that all new and updated iPhone and iPad apps submitted to the App Store on and after March 27, 2019 must be built with the iOS 12.1 SDK or later and support the iPhone XS Max and/or the latest 12.9-inch iPad Pro. App Store screenshots for those devices will also be required.


Likewise, all new apps and app updates for Apple Watch will need to be built with the watchOS 5.1 SDK or later and support the Apple Watch Series 4.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPhone XS

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Apple Discontinues 10.5-Inch iPad Pro Following Launch of Lower-Priced 10.5-Inch iPad Air

Apple has stopped selling the second-generation 10.5-inch iPad Pro, originally released in June 2017, after launching a new 10.5-inch iPad Air today.


The 10.5-inch iPad Pro had remained available from $649 following the release of 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models in October 2018, but it has been replaced by the 10.5-inch iPad Air with a cheaper starting price of $499.

The new iPad Air features a 10.5-inch Retina display, A12 Bionic chip, and Apple Pencil support and is available to order on Apple.com starting today.

Apple also released a new iPad mini with an A12 Bionic chip and Apple Pencil support today. The 9.7-inch iPad was not updated.

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Apple Launches New 10.5-Inch iPad Air With A12 Bionic Chip and Apple Pencil Support, Starts at $499

Apple today introduced an all-new iPad Air with a 10.5-inch display, A12 Bionic chip, and Apple Pencil support.


The new iPad Air is available to order on Apple.com and at Apple Stores and select resellers starting today with 64GB and 256GB storage. Prices start at $499 for Wi-Fi models and $629 for Wi-Fi + Cellular models in the United States.

The new iPad Air is a lower-cost replacement for the 10.5-inch iPad Pro, which was priced from $649 prior to being discontinued today.

Apple also introduced a new iPad mini with the A12 Bionic chip and Apple Pencil support. The 9.7-inch iPad was not updated today.

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Two New iPad Pro Models, 10.2-Inch iPad, and iPad Mini 5 Said to Launch in 2019

In a thorough research note outlining Apple's plans for 2019, analyst Ming-Chi Kuo describes his outlook for its next iPad lineup. According to Kuo, Apple plans to release two new iPad Pro models, a 10.2-inch iPad, and a refreshed iPad mini equipped with an upgraded processor later this year.


More details to follow…

Related Roundups: iPad mini 5, iPad Pro, iPad

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