Deals Spotlight: 2019 iPad Air Discounted to New Low Prices (Up to $52 Off)

The latest iPad Air is receiving a notable discount this week at Amazon, with up to $52 off select models of the 2019 tablet.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This includes both Wi-Fi and cellular devices, with prices starting at $579 for the 64GB cellular iPad Air and rising from there. As a note, every price listed below is the current lowest-ever price for these models.

2019 iPad Air Sale


Apple updated the iPad Air in March 2019 with a new 10.5-inch display, Touch ID, headphone jack, A12 Bionic processor, and support for the Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard.

You can discover sales like a new iPhone 7 offer from AT&T and many more in our full Deals Roundup.

Related Roundups: Apple Deals, iPad Air
Buyer's Guide: iPad Air (Buy Now)

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Deals Spotlight: Get the 2019 10.5-Inch iPad Air for $50 Off (Lowest Ever)

Amazon is discounting Apple's new 10.5-inch iPad Air by $50 across numerous models, including both W-Fi and cellular configurations.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Prices start at $449.99 for the 64GB Wi-Fi model and rise from there. Across the board, these are the lowest prices ever seen on each iPad Air, which was just updated in March.

2019 iPad Air Sale


  • Wi-Fi, 64GB - $449.99, down from $499.00 ($49 off, lowest ever)

  • Wi-Fi, 256GB - $599.00, down from $649.00 ($50 off, lowest ever)

  • Cellular, 64GB - $579.99, down from $629.00 ($49 off, lowest ever)

  • Cellular, 256GB - $729.00, down from $779.00 ($50 off, lowest ever)
The new iPad Air has a 10.5-inch display with Touch ID, a headphone jack, A12 Bionic processor, Apple Pencil support, and Smart Keyboard support.

Our full Deals Roundup has even more information on the latest sales and bargains going on this week.

Related Roundups: Apple Deals, iPad Air
Buyer's Guide: iPad Air (Buy Now)

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iPad Air vs. Microsoft’s Surface Go: Which Is a Better Laptop Replacement?

Apple's iPad Air, which was resurrected in March as essentially a tweaked version of the previous 10.5-inch iPad Pro, offers a significant amount of utility at a solid $499 price point, but how does it compare to other competitors in the market?

In his latest video, MacRumors videographer Dan compared the iPad Air to Microsoft's Surface Go to determine which one he liked better for on-the-go computing.

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For this comparison, Dan decided to focus on using the iPad Air and the Surface Go as somewhat of a laptop replacement. The iPad Air starts at $499 while the Surface Go comes in at a $399 base price, but in an effort to look at these as potential laptop replacements Dan opted to consider the devices equipped with first-party keyboard accessories, which pushes the iPad Air up to $659 and the Surface Go to $529.

In his video, Dan shares his impressions on the design and features of each, including important productivity accessories like respective keyboards and styluses.

As potential laptop replacements, performance is really where the rubber meets the road, and Dan came away somewhat unimpressed with the Surface Go. He wanted to like its relatively full-fledged Windows 10 operating system, and it was fine for basic tasks like emails, web browsing, and document writing, but he found things bogging down a bit when trying to multitask.

With the iPad Air, you don't really get a desktop-class operating system, at least for now, but it generally works very well when you need to multitask, switching easily among Safari, Messages, Notes, Mail, iWork and more with no performance issues. And with iPadOS 13 coming later this year, the iPad will become even more powerful.

So where do we come down on the iPad Air versus the Surface Go? It's a challenging comparison considering they have some significant spec differences and everyone's use case is different. Overall, Dan found the iPad Air to offer a more enjoyable user experience, although it's not quite a laptop replacement. But neither is the Surface Go in his experience, and he wonders whether it isn't better to just point someone toward a Chromebook or more traditional Windows notebook if they're looking for a cheap laptop experience.

Related Roundup: iPad Air
Buyer's Guide: iPad Air (Buy Now)

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iPad Air Teardown: A12 Bionic Processor With 3GB of RAM, Bluetooth 5 and Larger Battery, But Lacks ProMotion Display Tech

iFixit today shared a teardown of the resurrected iPad Air, confirming specs and providing some additional details about the component parts of Apple's new middle-tier tablet, which is compatible with the first-gen Apple Pencil.


The iPad Air is identical in size and thickness to the 2017 10.5-inch iPad Pro, and just a bit lighter weight. iFixit notes that outwardly, the only design differences include a new, darker Space Gray color, the absence of a camera bump, and two speakers compared to the iPad Pro's four. The new model number is A2152.

Opening the iPad Air up reveals an internal layout and central logic board similar to Apple's 2017 iPad Pro range. The dual-celled 30.8 Wh battery is a little bigger than the 30.2 Wh Apple advertises on its site, and a provides a step up from the 27.6 Wh battery in the 2014 iPad Air 2. Battery life is advertised as up to 10 hours.

Meanwhile, Apple's A12 Bionic processor is layered over 3GB of RAM, and iFixit confirms the rear camera remains at 8 megapixels.

Otherwise, as iFixit notes, the size is similar, the Pencil support is similar, and the chips are similar to the old 10.5-inch iPad Pro. However, the Air lacks the latter's ProMotion 120 Hz technology that's now exclusive to the 2018 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro. ProMotion automatically adjusts the display to the movement of the content, for fluid scrolling, greater responsiveness and smoother motion.

The new iPad Air is harder to take apart than the late 10.5-inch iPad Pro, since it lacks the latter's stretch-release adhesive pull tabs and includes extra adhesive near the top of the screen. As such, iFixit gives the new iPad Air a 2/10 for repairability, the same score the new iPad mini earned in yesterday's teardown.

Related Roundup: iPad Air
Tag: iFixit
Buyer's Guide: iPad Air (Buy Now)

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Hands-On With Apple’s New iPad Air 3 and iPad Mini 5

Apple last week surprised us with a brand new iPad in the iPad Air family and a new iPad mini 5, both of which are outfitted with Apple's latest chip technology.

Both the iPad mini 5 and the iPad Air 3 began shipping out to customers, and, as of today, are available in stores. We picked up both tablets to give MacRumors readers a look at Apple's new middle-tier iPads.

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Priced at $399 for the iPad mini and $499 for the iPad Air, Apple's refreshed iPads are not as expensive as the iPad Pro (starts at $799) nor as affordable as the 6th-generation 2018 iPad (starts at $329), and the hardware and design match up with a middle-of-the-road tablet.

The iPad Air is using the same design as the 10.5-inch iPad Pro, while the iPad mini 5 uses the same design as the previous-generation iPad mini 4. Both tablets feature thick top and bottom bezels, with the bottom bezel housing a Touch ID Home button for biometric authentication purposes.


In comparison, the iPad Pro has much slimmer bezels thanks to the removal of Touch ID in favor of Face ID, while the $329 iPad has the same general design but a body that's not as slim.

When it comes to the screen, both of these tablets are using a laminated Retina display that supports wide color for vivid, true to life images and True Tone for adjusting the white balance to match the ambient lighting in the room. It's a better display than the non-laminated display on Apple's cheapest iPad, but lacks the ProMotion technology used in the iPad Pro for a variable refresh rate up to 120Hz.


The iPad Air and the iPad mini support the original Apple Pencil, so for the first time, Apple's entire iPad lineup works with either the original Apple Pencil or the Apple Pencil 2.

Inside, the iPad Air and the iPad mini are using the A12 Bionic chip, which is the same chip that's in the 2018 iPhone lineup. The $329 iPad is still using an A10 Fusion chip from the iPhone 7 era, while the iPad Pro models use a faster A12X chip.


Functionally, both the iPad Air 3 and the iPad mini 5 are the same tablet with the same specs, with the only difference between the two being screen size and Smart Keyboard compatibility. The iPad Air has a Smart Connector that can be used with a Smart Keyboard, which costs $159. There's no Smart Keyboard for iPad mini because it lacks a Smart Connector.

The two iPads have mediocre 8-megapixel rear cameras, the same camera that's in the $329 iPad, but the 7-megapixel front-facing camera is the same camera (minus Face ID technology) used in the iPad Pro. It's odd to have front and rear cameras that are nearly on par, but it makes sense if you think of the iPad as a FaceTiming device more so than a photography device.

Both of these iPads offer significant performance improvements over their predecessors. The iPad mini 5 is a good deal faster than the iPad mini 4, and the iPad Air is faster than the 10.5-inch iPad Pro (though it lacks the same ProMotion technology). It's also leagues faster than any previous iPad Air model as that was a line that was last refreshed in 2014 before being revived in 2019.

Old iPad Air on left, new iPad Air on right

If you're using an older iPad and are in need of an upgrade, you're not going to go wrong with the iPad mini 5 or the iPad Air 3 given the incredible speed boosts these tablets bring thanks to the A12 chip. As everyday tablets, the iPad mini and iPad Air are a solid value and a welcome addition to Apple's iPad lineup, which was previously split between high end (iPad Pro) and low end (iPad). Check out our iPad Buyer's Guide for help choosing an iPad if you're not sure which one is right for you.

You can get the iPad mini for $399 for 64GB of storage, and 256GB is available for $549. The iPad Air starts at $499 for 64GB of storage, with 256GB available for $649. Cellular models are available too, for an extra $130 over each base price.

What do you think of the new iPad mini and the new iPad Air? Have you purchased one or are you planning to get one? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundups: iPad mini 5, iPad Air

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Picking the Best iPad to Buy in 2019

In March 2019, Apple updated its iPad lineup with two new tablets: the fifth-generation iPad mini and the 10.5-inch iPad Air. These models are now part of Apple's full iPad line, also including the 9.7-inch iPad, 11-inch iPad Pro, and 12.9-inch iPad Pro to make five models total.

iPad Comparison



Which iPad is right for you?


If price is your biggest consideration, you'll want to look at the basic 9.7-inch iPad, knowing it has older technology in it. If you're looking for portability, check out the iPad mini, and if you want a mid-sized iPad with a bit more to offer than the entry-level iPad, check out the new iPad Air.

What about the iPad Pro? Apple's high-end iPads are in a class by themselves, and it shows in the price. Unless you're a pro-level user or cost is no object, you'll probably want to look to cheaper options, but the iPad Pro models deliver cutting-edge technology for those who need it.

With that quick overview out of the way, let's take a look at what each model has to offer.

iPad Models


9.7-inch iPad


Starting at the low end of the iPad price spectrum, Apple has the basic 9.7-inch iPad starting at $329 for the Wi-Fi only model. This iPad is perfect if you're on a budget as it's also frequently on sale, and is popular in the education field.

It has the most important features users are looking for in an iPad, like a generous display, Touch ID, and a decent rear camera, as well as support for the first-generation Apple Pencil if you're into drawing, handwritten notes, and other tasks that don't work quite as well with your finger.

iPad Comparison Chart
That low-end price tag does mean there are a few sacrifices, however, as the front FaceTime camera is relatively low resolution compared to other iPads and the display is a definite step down as it lacks rich wide color support, True Tone technology that automatically adjusts overall tone based on ambient light, and an antireflective coating that helps minimize glare on other models. The display also isn't laminated to the cover glass, so you'll notice a bit of an air gap rather than feeling like you're directly touching the screen.

Key specifications include:
  • A 9.7‑inch Retina display

  • Home button with Touch ID

  • A10 Fusion chip

  • 8MP back camera with HDR and 1080p HD video

  • 1.2MP FaceTime HD front camera with HDR

  • Compatible with first-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Bluetooth keyboards

  • Lightning port

  • Colors include: silver, space gray, and gold

iPad mini


Next up is the newly-updated iPad mini, which starts at $399 for Wi-Fi only models. Apple's refresh of this smaller-sized tablet improved its internals and introduced support for the first-generation Apple Pencil, making it a capable mid-range tablet with ultra portability.

With a display size of 7.9 inches, you can't quite call it pocketable, but the iPad mini is definitely great for having something small on the go that still offers a much larger screen size than even Apple's largest iPhones.


Looking beyond the display size, this is a very capable device using the same A12 Bionic chip from Apple's latest iPhones, so it's a speedy tablet. You'll get an improved display compared to the entry-level iPad, a much better front FaceTime camera, and support for the first-generation Apple Pencil.

Key specifications include:
  • Fully laminated 7.9‑inch Retina display with True Tone

  • Touch ID

  • A12 Bionic chip with Neural Engine

  • 8MP back camera with HDR and 1080p HD video

  • 7MP FaceTime HD front camera with Auto HDR

  • Compatible with first-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Bluetooth keyboards

  • Lightning port

  • Colors include: silver, space gray, and gold

10.5-inch iPad Air


In the middle of the iPad family now sits the 10.5-inch iPad Air, starting at $499 for Wi-Fi only models. Apple's brand-new iPad Air is now the perfect mid-tier option with a nice screen size, speedier internals, and first-generation Apple Pencil support.

The iPad Air and iPad mini have nearly identical specs aside from the display size, so size is likely going to be the most significant factor if you're deciding between the two.


The only other significant difference is that the iPad Air has a Smart Connector for easy connection to a Smart Keyboard accessory if you prefer a hardware keyboard for your iPad. The iPad mini's smaller size means it doesn't support a Smart Keyboard, although you can still pair a Bluetooth keyboard with it if you like.

Key specifications include:
  • Fully laminated 10.5‑inch Retina display with True Tone

  • Touch ID

  • A12 Bionic chip with Neural Engine

  • 8MP back camera with HDR and 1080p HD video

  • 7MP FaceTime HD front camera with Auto HDR

  • Compatible with first-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Smart Keyboard and Bluetooth keyboards

  • Lightning port

  • Colors include: silver, space gray, and gold

iPad Pro


If you're looking for true portable workstation power, then the last two iPads in the lineup -- the iPad Pro models -- could be what you're interested in. These tablets were updated in late 2018 with Face ID and a near bezel-less design that mirrors the look of the iPhone X family.

These iPads, which start at $799 for the smaller 11-inch model and $999 for the 12.9-inch model, are a step up from the iPad Air in almost every way, from an improved "Liquid Retina" display with rounded corners and ProMotion technology for smoother display performance to a more powerful A12X chip and a better 12-megapixel rear camera with flash. You'll also get support for the second-generation Apple Pencil, which magnetically attaches to the iPad Pro and charges wirelessly.


To be honest, the iPad Pro is overkill for most mainstream users, but if you're a pro-level user or just want the latest technology, the iPad Pro has a lot to offer.

The main difference between the two iPad Pros is their screen sizes, so the following key specifications are for both models:
  • 11‑inch and 12.9-inch Liquid Retina displays with ProMotion technology and True Tone

  • Face ID

  • A12X Bionic chip with Neural Engine

  • 12MP back camera with Smart HDR and 4K video at 30 fps or 60 fps

  • 7MP TrueDepth front camera with Portrait mode, Portrait Lighting, and Smart HDR

  • Compatible with second-generation Apple Pencil

  • Compatible with Smart Keyboard Folio and Bluetooth keyboards

  • USB-C connector instead of Lightning

  • Colors include: silver and space gray

Customization Options


Now that we've looked at the base specs of each of iPad models, it's time to think about various options like storage, cellular connectivity, and AppleCare+.

Storage: There are several storage options for each iPad, so think about how much you might need. On the low end, the 9.7-inch iPad is available in two sizes not seen anywhere else in the iPad family: 32GB ($329) and 128GB ($100 upgrade at $429).

For the just-released iPad mini and iPad Air, Apple is offering two storage options: 64GB ($399 for mini and $499 for Air) and 256GB (a $150 upgrade on the previous prices).


Lastly, the iPad Pro has the most storage capacity options. You can choose from the base 64GB option ($799 for 11-inch and $999 for 12.9-inch), or 256GB ($150 upgrade from base), 512GB ($350 upgrade from base), and 1TB ($750 upgrade from base).

Power-heavy users should always look to the higher-capacity iPad models to ensure they don't have to worry about constantly deleting apps and other files for storage space. Otherwise, Apple's iCloud is a great way to offload files and lets you opt for a cheaper iPad with less storage.

Unless you're storing a large local music library, downloading lots of video for offline playback, have a ton of huge apps, or doing pro-level work requiring lots of large files, mainstream users can usually get away with the lowest-tier storage options.

Cellular Connectivity: If you need to ensure that you can use your iPad at any time, including when you're not near a Wi-Fi connection, you can opt for a Wi-Fi + Cellular option to ensure you're always connected.

Cellular support adds $130–$150 onto the price of all corresponding Wi-Fi iPad models, depending on which iPad and which storage capacity. You'll also have to sign up for a data plan for an additional cost with a supported carrier, like AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, or Verizon in the United States.

All told, it's not a cheap upgrade, and many users prefer using their phone as a hotspot to deliver connectivity to a Wi-Fi iPad while on the go. But if you're phone plan doesn't allow for hotspot usage or you just want the convenience of having your iPad connected directly to a cellular network at all times, the option is there.

AppleCare+: New iPads come with one year of hardware repair coverage through Apple's limited warranty policy, as well as up to 90 days of complimentary support. But if you want more coverage, Apple offers optional AppleCare+ packages priced at $69 for the 9.7-inch iPad, iPad mini, and iPad Air or $129 for the iPad Pro.

AppleCare+ extends your iPad's coverage to two years from the purchase date and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, subject to a service fee of $49 plus applicable taxes in the United States. Prices vary elsewhere.


iPad AppleCare+ plans also cover accidental damage to the Apple Pencil for up to two years with a $29 fee plus tax per incident. AppleCare+ provides 24/7 priority access to support advisors via online chat or phone for up to two years after the iPad's original purchase date.

Apple charges high fees for accidental damage to a new iPad without AppleCare+, so as with most forms of insurance, the plan can pay for itself if ever used. AppleCare+ must be added within 60 days of purchasing a device.

Accessories


Each iPad has a plethora of accessories to choose from for protection, style, or usability, many of which Apple creates and sells itself on Apple.com and in Apple retail stores.

Apple Pencil: The Apple Pencil is a stylus most popular with artists but also used by others, providing a comfortable and streamlined way to interact with the tablet. The second-generation Apple Pencil introduced sleek design changes, magnetic charging on iPad Pro, and gesture controls, none of which are available on the original Apple Pencil.


It might be unclear which iPads support which Apple Pencil models, but with the new iPad mini and iPad Air it's become a bit simpler. In short, the iPad Pro uses the second-generation Apple Pencil while all other iPad models work with the first-generation Apple Pencil.

- First-Generation Apple Pencil ($100): 9.7-inch iPad (2018), fifth-generation iPad mini (2019), 10.5-inch iPad Air (2019)
- Second-Generation Apple Pencil ($130): 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro (2018)

In the end, if you're only looking to purchase an iPad as a convenient app-browsing, email-checking, or FaceTime device, you don't need an Apple Pencil. But if you're an artist or other creative with a penchant for drawing or taking digital handwritten notes, Apple's stylus is definitely an enhancement to the iPad experience.

For a more in-depth look at the differences between the two Apple Pencils, check out our comparison.

Cases: Apple sells Smart Cover and Smart Folio cases for all of its iPads, priced depending on the size of the device. You'll pay $39.00 for a 9.7-inch iPad Smart Cover, $39.00 for an iPad mini Smart Cover, $49.00 for an iPad Air Smart Cover, $79.00 for an 11-inch iPad Pro Smart Folio, and $99.00 for a 12.9-inch iPad Pro Smart Folio.


These cases magnetically attach to your iPad, offering a degree of protection while also allowing you to place the tablet in numerous angled positions. The difference between the two is that the iPad Pro's Smart Folio cases protect the rear of the tablet as well as the front, while the Smart Cover cases only protect the front.

Keyboards: If you're looking to do a lot of work on an iPad Pro, Apple also sells the Smart Keyboard Folio at $179.00 for the 11-inch model and $199.00 for the 12.9-inch model. This case is just like the Smart Folio, with an added Bluetooth keyboard for enhanced productivity. A similar accessory is available for the 10.5-inch iPad Air.


These Apple-made cases are compatible with iPads that have a Smart Keyboard connector, which is a special port that magnetically attaches the keyboard to the side of the iPad.

Otherwise, you can also look into popular iPad keyboard manufacturers like Brydge, Logitech, and Belkin, all of which sell Bluetooth keyboards that connect to iPads wirelessly. Keyboard cases are more expensive than your average case due to the added input use, but if you really plan on doing a lot of work and writing on your iPad, the two-in-one keyboard/protection combo is the way to go. The hardware keyboards give a much better typing experience and free up screen space on your iPad by getting rid of the software keyboard.

Cables: Apple's iPad lineup now has differing cable standard, making matters a bit confusing. The easy way to remember is that if you're purchasing anything that's not an iPad Pro, you'll be charging the iPad with a regular Apple Lightning cable.


If you're going with an iPad Pro, then you'll be using USB-C cables. All iPads come with their required cables in the box, but if you don't have many around the house it's always a good idea to stock up on more. Apple sells individual cables, but you can always shop around on Amazon for cheap and reliable brands like Anker, Aukey, and RAVPower.

So... Which iPad Should You Buy?


Overall, Apple's brand-new 10.5-inch iPad Air is a perfect all-encompassing tablet that should hit the check marks for many buyers. You can do everything from quickly browsing Twitter and checking emails to getting a few hours of work done with a paired keyboard, which isn't bad for the $499 starting price.

If you're someone who has preferred the 7.9-inch form factor of the iPad mini over the years, Apple's latest small-sized tablet is well worth the update and has nearly all of the features of the new iPad Air. The iPad mini doesn't have a Smart Keyboard connector like the iPad Air or a Smart Keyboard case of its own, but since the iPad mini isn't exactly a workstation device, that's not a bad trade-off (plus, you can still connect it to a Bluetooth keyboard if you want).

For $100 less than the iPad Air at $399 (64GB Wi-Fi), you'll still have a nice laminated display with True Tone and antireflective coating, Touch ID, the speedy A12 Bionic chip, first-generation Apple Pencil support, and the same cameras, all in an ultra-portable 7.9-inch tablet.


If you're shopping around for a cheap tablet for a kid, definitely consider Apple's 9.7-inch iPad, which sees discounts below its $329 price tag pretty often. Sale prices in the $230–$250 range are not unheard of, and pairing the iPad with a super-rugged child-proof case is a perfect birthday or holiday present. Frugal shoppers should also check out Apple's refurbished store to shop around for older-model iPads offered at discount.

And, of course, on the other end are the power users. If you're willing to spend the money to spec-out a 12.9-inch iPad Pro, you'll get a super reliable mobile workstation with 10-hour battery life in a 1.4 lb package. If you travel frequently for work, or just like setting up at a coffee shop during the day, the iPad Pro has a chance to become your MacBook replacement with a paired keyboard.

The most recent additions to Apple's iPad lineup provides a wide variety of options and offers clear distinctions between tablets that should help make your decision a little easier.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPad mini 5, iPad, iPad Air

This article, "Picking the Best iPad to Buy in 2019" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Store Pickup Now Available for New iPad Mini and iPad Air

Apple today activated in-store pickup for its new iPad mini and iPad Air models in the United States, Canada, Australia, and select other countries.


This feature enables customers to purchase a new iPad on Apple.com and pick it up at a nearby Apple Store at a designated time. The tool can also be used to monitor inventory of the new iPads at Apple Stores based on zip or postal code, with both models currently available for pickup today at many locations.

To view in-store inventory, head to the iPad mini or iPad Air product pages, choose a color and other options, and select "see availability in other stores." To place an order for in-store pickup, proceed with the checkout process as usual and it will be presented as an option along with standard delivery.

The new iPad mini and iPad Air are very similar. Both tablets feature Apple's recent A12 Bionic chip, Retina displays with True Tone, first-generation Apple Pencil support, 64GB or 256GB storage, Touch ID, up to 10 hours of battery life, an 8-megapixel rear camera, two speakers, and optional Gigabit-class LTE.

The new iPad mini's only notable differences versus the new 10.5-inch iPad Air are its smaller 7.9-inch screen and lack of Smart Keyboard compatibility. The new iPad mini also has a lower starting price of $399 versus $499 for the new iPad Air.

Apple is currently quoting an April 15-17 delivery estimate for standard ship-to-home orders, so in-store pickup looks to be a quicker option.

The new AirPods are also available for Apple Store pickup.

Related Roundups: iPad mini 5, Apple Stores, iPad Air

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Logitech Crayon Compatible With New iPad Air and iPad Mini

Apple's new iPad Air and fifth-generation iPad mini both work with the Apple Pencil, but are limited to the first-generation Apple Pencil rather than the second-generation model, which only works with 2018 iPad Pros.

If you're looking for a more affordable alternative, though, it turns out both new iPad models are compatible with the Logitech Crayon, an Apple Pencil-like stylus that previously was only compatible with the sixth-generation iPad.


Apple updated its online store listing for the Crayon following the launch of the new iPad models, noting compatibility with both.


Priced at $70, the Crayon is a lower-cost alternative to the Apple Pencil that works in the same way. It features a slim aluminum body and Pencil-like tip, with palm rejection and the same latency and tilt that you get with the Apple Pencil.

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It does not, however, feature pressure sensitivity support, so that's one feature you'll miss out on choosing the Crayon over the Apple Pencil.


Logitech designed the Crayon for students (and schools can buy it for just $50), so it has a flat surface to prevent rolling, a tethered rubber end cap, a grip that's meant to be comfortable for small hands, and it's durable enough to withstand drops of up to four feet.


The Crayon charges using a built-in Lightning port, so you can use a standard Lightning cable to charge it up. The battery lasts for approximately 7 and a half hours before needing to be recharged. No Bluetooth pairing is needed to connect the Crayon to an iPad - it works automatically.


Logitech's Crayon is available from the Apple online store and in Apple retail stores.

Related Roundups: iPad mini 5, iPad Air
Buyer's Guide: iPad Mini (Buy Now)

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A12 Bionic in New iPad Paired With 3GB RAM, Clocks in at Same Speed as Latest iPhones

Apple's new fifth-generation iPad mini and resurrected iPad Air were announced this morning, and both of the new tablets are equipped with Apple's latest A12 Bionic processors, initially introduced in the 2018 iPhones.

The first Geekbench benchmark of one of the new iPad models (11,2) surfaced shortly after Apple's announcement, confirming a 2.49GHz clock speed, identical to the iPhone's clock speed. The benchmarked iPad also features 3GB RAM, 1GB less than the iPad Pro and 1GB more than the 9.7-inch iPad. 3GB RAM is also the amount of RAM in the iPhone XR, while the XS and XS Max feature 4GB.


At this point in time, we don't know if iPad 11,2 is an iPad mini 5 or a 10.5-inch iPad Air, but given the similarity in specs between the two tablets, we suspect that both models are using the same clock speed and RAM.

The iPad 11,2 earned a single-core Geekbench score of 4806 and a multi-core score of 11607, which, unsurprisingly, is right on par with iPhone Geekbench results, though a bit faster, perhaps due to improvements in iOS 12.2.

While the iPad Air and the iPad mini 5 appear to feature similar specs and may include the same amount of RAM, we'll need to wait for further Geekbench scores to confirm. We'll update this post when more information is available.

The new iPad Air and the iPad mini 5 are both available for purchase from Apple today and will arrive to customers at the end of March. The iPad Air, which features a 10.5-inch Retina display, Touch ID, a headphone jack, and Apple Pencil support, is priced starting at $499 for 64GB storage.

The fifth-generation iPad mini with a 7.9-inch Retina display, Apple Pencil support, Touch ID, 8-megapixel rear camera, and a headphone jack is priced starting at $399 for 64GB storage.

Related Roundups: iPad mini 5, iPad Air
Buyer's Guide: iPad Mini (Buy Now)

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2019 10.5-Inch iPad Air vs. 2017 10.5-Inch iPad Pro

Apple has launched a new 10.5-inch iPad Air that can be viewed as a lower-priced successor to the second-generation 10.5-inch iPad Pro, which has been discontinued. Below, we compare tech specs and features.


Pricing is key, with the new iPad Air starting at $499 with Wi-Fi only and $629 with LTE connectivity in the United States. The 10.5-inch iPad Pro started at $649 with Wi-Fi and $779 with LTE connectivity until it was discontinued. Both have 64GB or 256GB of storage, but the new iPad Air lacks a 512GB option.

Design wise, the iPads have a lot of similarities, including dimensions, thinness, and overall appearance. Both have a Touch ID home button, a headphone jack, and a Lightning connector, but the new iPad Air has only two speakers along the bottom, whereas the 10.5-inch iPad Pro has four speakers.

The new iPad Air is available in Silver, Space Gray, and a newer Gold finish that essentially merges the previously separate Gold and Rose Gold finishes that were available for the 10.5-inch iPad Pro.

Both iPads feature a fully laminated Retina display with a resolution of 2224×1668 pixels and 264 PPI, True Tone, and support for the P3 wide color space, but the new 10.5-inch iPad Air has a 60Hz refresh rate while the 10.5-inch iPad Pro has a so-called ProMotion display with up to a 120Hz refresh rate.

Processor wise, the new iPad Air sports Apple's A12 Bionic chip compared to a slower A10X Fusion chip in the 10.5-inch iPad Pro. The new iPad Air also has dedicated hardware called the "Neural Engine" that handles artificial intelligence and machine learning tasks, while the 10.5-inch iPad Pro does not.

In terms of battery life, both iPads last up to 10 hours per charge, according to Apple's internal testing.

With its lower price point, the new iPad Air has a lower-end 8-megapixel rear camera, compared to a 12-megapixel sensor on the 10.5-inch iPad Pro. The rear camera on the new iPad Air also lacks LED flash, optical image stabilization, and Focus Pixels, but one benefit is that there is no camera bump.

The front FaceTime HD cameras are the same 7-megapixel sensors with Live Photos, Retina Flash, and other identical features on both iPads.

As for connectivity, both iPads have 802.11ac Wi-Fi, but the new iPad Air has Gigabit-class LTE versus the 10.5-inch iPad Pro's theoretically slower LTE Advanced support. The new iPad Air also gets a bump to Bluetooth 5.0 versus Bluetooth 4.2 out of the box for the 10.5-inch iPad Pro.

Summary

  • The new iPad Air starts at $150 less than the 10.5-inch iPad Pro and thus has some tradeoffs: two speakers versus four, no ProMotion display, and a lower-end 8-megapixel rear camera with no LED flash or optical image stabilization.
  • Both iPads have a 10.5-inch Retina display with 264 PPI, headphone jack, Touch ID, Lightning connector, 7-megapixel front camera, up to 10 hours of battery life, and 802.11ac Wi-Fi.
  • The new iPad Air has some advantages: faster A12 Bionic chip vs. A10X Fusion, Gigabit-class LTE vs. LTE Advanced, and Bluetooth 5.0 vs 4.2.
The new iPad Air can be ordered starting today with in-store availability beginning next week in the United States and many other regions.

Related Roundup: iPad Air

This article, "2019 10.5-Inch iPad Air vs. 2017 10.5-Inch iPad Pro" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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