Apple Releases Third Public Betas of iOS 13 and iPadOS

Apple today released the third public betas of iOS 13 and iPadOS to its public beta testing group, 10 days after seeding the second public betas and a day after the fourth developer beta. The public beta gives non-developers a chance to test out iOS 13 ahead of its upcoming fall launch date.

Beta testers who have signed up for Apple's beta testing program will receive the iOS 13 beta update over-the-air after installing the proper certificate on an iOS device.


Those who want to join the beta testing program can sign up on Apple's beta testing website, which gives users access to iOS, macOS, and tvOS betas. Before installing a beta, make sure to create a full encrypted iTunes backup or an iCloud backup. It's best to install iOS 13 on a secondary device because beta software is not always stable and can include bugs.

iOS 13 is a major update to the iOS operating system that runs on the iPhone and the iPad, but this year, iOS 13 and iPadOS, the version of iOS 13 that runs on the iPad, are separate downloads as they've been split up.


iPadOS is identical to iOS 13 in almost every way, though there are some iPad-specific features such as new multitasking capabilities. For the most part, the two operating systems share the same features.

iOS 13 introduces a long list of new features. Dark Mode changes the entire look of the operating system, shifting it from light to dark, while an overhauled Photos app makes it easier to relive your memories with new Days, Months, and Years viewing options.


There's a new photo editing interface that makes it easier to edit photos than ever before, plus there are new tools to work with and options to edit the intensity of the built-in filters. You can edit video right in the Photos app for the first time, and on the newest iPhones, there's a new High-Key Mono lighting effect and an option to adjust the intensity of Portrait Lightning effects.

There's a less obtrusive volume HUD, a new Find My app that combines Find My iPhone and Find My Friends and lets you track your devices even with they don't have an LTE or WiFi connection. A Sign In with Apple feature (not yet active) gives you a convenient and data safe way to sign into apps and websites, providing an alternative to Facebook and Google sign in options.


Maps has a new street-level "Look Around" mode and a Collections feature for making lists of places, Reminders has been entirely overhauled to make it more functional, there's a profile feature in Messages along with new Memoji and Animoji stickers, and Siri has a new voice.

The third public beta should correspond to the fourth developer beta, which brought a new Quick Action for rearranging apps, Share Sheet updates, new 3D Touch settings, and more, with changes available in our what's new in beta 4 article.

There are a ton of additional new features and changes coming in iOS 13, and for a full rundown of what you can expect, make sure to check out our iOS 13 roundup.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Everything New in iOS 13 Beta 4: Quick Action Updates, Share Sheet Changes and More

Apple this morning released the fourth beta of iOS 13 for developers, introducing bug fixes and adding and refining iOS 13 features.

Now that we're into the fourth beta, changes and updates are getting more minor, but there are still some small but notable tweaks that are worth highlighting in today's beta.

- Quick Actions - There's a refreshed look for Quick Actions on the Home screen, which adds a new "Rearrange Apps" option that lets you quickly get to the wiggle mode that allows apps to be moved around.


- Quick Actions Menu Size - The menu that pops up when using a Quick Action is also smaller in size with less obtrusive icons that have also been relocated to the right side of the menu interface.

- 3D Touch Settings - In the Accessibility section of the Settings app, there are new options for 3D Touch in the 3D & Haptic Touch section (which was previously just 3D Touch). There's a new "Touch Duration" section alongside the sensitivity slider. The Touch Duration option changes the amount of time it takes to reveal content previews, actions, and contextual menus.


- Share Sheet - Some minor design changes have been made to the Share Sheet in iOS 13, tweaking the colors and adding some transparency.


- Voice Messages - When using the option in Messages to record a voice-based message, there's a new icon for the option. It's now a waveform rather than a microphone icon.


- Widgets - When editing Widgets in the Today View, you'll see a new look for the edit button, which is now pill-shaped rather than circular.


Know of a feature that's new in iOS 13 beta 4 that we left out? Make sure to let us know in the comments and we'll update this article.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Seeds Fourth Betas of iOS 13 and iPadOS to Developers

Apple today seeded the fourth betas of iOS 13 and iPadOS to developers for testing purposes, two weeks after releasing the third betas and more than a month after unveiling the new operating system at the Worldwide Developers Conference.

Registered developers will need to download the profile for the iOS 13 and iPadOS betas from Apple's Developer Center. Beta 4, like earlier betas, can be downloaded over-the-air once the proper profile has been installed.


Apple split iOS 13 and iPadOS into separate updates in 2019, one designed for iPhone and one designed for iPad. iPadOS is identical to iOS 13 in almost every way, though there are some iPad-specific features such as new multitasking capabilities. For the most part, the two operating systems share the same features.

iOS 13 is a huge update with a long list of new features. Perhaps the most noticeable outward-facing change is a systemwide Dark Mode that changes the entire look of the operating system from light to dark, darkening everything from system elements to apps.


Apple overhauled the Photos app, introducing a new Photos tab that curates your entire Photos library and shows you a selection of highlights organized by day, month, or year, and there are revamped Photo editing tools.


For the first time, you can edit video right in the Photos app, cropping, rotating, applying filters, and adjusting lighting and color. There's a new High-Key Mono lighting effect, and for Portrait Lighting in general, intensity can be adjusted.

There's a less obtrusive volume HUD, a new Find My app that combines Find My iPhone and Find My Friends and lets you track your devices even with they don't have an LTE or WiFi connection.


A Sign In with Apple feature (not yet active) gives you a convenient and data safe way to sign into apps and websites, providing an alternative to Facebook and Google sign in options. Apple's even able to generate single-use randomized email addresses so you don't have to give your real info to apps and websites.


Maps features a new street-level "Look Around" mode and a Collections feature for making lists of places, Reminders has been entirely overhauled to make it more functional, there's a profile option in Messages along with new Memoji and Animoji stickers, and Siri has a new voice.


CarPlay in iOS 13 has been overhauled with a new look, multiple sets of AirPods (or Powerbeats Pro) can be connected to the same phone so you can share music with a friend, Siri on HomePod can detect multiple voices for multi-user support, and HomePod also supports Handoff.


There are a ton of additional new features and changes coming in iOS 13, and for a full rundown of what you can expect, you should check out our iOS 13 roundup. Each new beta brings new features and changes to iOS 13, and the third beta introduced a FaceTime Attention Correction option, changes to Split View to make it more obvious which window is being typed in, a Me tab for the Find My app, and more.

The beta testing period will allow Apple to work out bugs ahead of the release of iOS 13 and iPadOS, and it will let developers build iOS 13 and iPadOS features into their apps ahead of a public release coming this fall.

What's New in iOS 13 Beta 4



- Quick Actions - There's a refreshed look for Quick Actions on the Home screen, which adds a new "Rearrange Apps" option that lets you quickly get to the wiggle mode that allows apps to be moved around.



Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Hong Kong’s Octopus Transit Card to Support Apple Pay Later This Year [Updated]

Update - Jul 11: Octopus Cards Limited has now confirmed that customers will be able to use their Octopus cards on their iPhone or Apple Watch for transit and retail payment with Apple Pay later this year. Original story below.




iOS 13 may come with built-in support for Hong Kong's Octopus contactless payment system, if a few lines of code discovered on Apple's servers are any indication.

Tech blog Ata Distance spotted the code snippet in Apple's online JSON-based Apple Pay pass identifier (link now removed), which shows references to Octopus in iOS 13.

The discovery also tallies with specific references to Octopus on Apple Pay in the iOS 13 beta, according to the Japan-focused site.

Octopus is based on the same FeliCa NFC standard used for the Japanese Suica card, and is used by the vast majority of Hong Kong residents for making transit payments and retail transactions.


Originally launched in 1997 as a physical contactless card, the FeliCa-based version made the transition to electronic payment solution when the company unveiled Smart Octopus for Samsung Pay in December 2017.

The exclusive deal with Samsung left Apple Pay users without a way to take advantage Smart Octopus, despite it being technically compatible with iPhone 7 and later models, so today's find should make for good news for those hoping to digitize the popular transit and retail payment card, which should also support Apple's Express Transit mode.

iOS 13 for iPhone is expected to be released in the fall.

Related Roundups: Apple Pay, iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Releases Revised Version of iOS 13 and iPadOS Developer Beta 3

Alongside the second public beta versions of iOS 13 and iPadOS, Apple today also released a revised third beta version of the operating systems for developers.


The reason for the new version isn't entirely clear, but the original third developer beta was not available for the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus for some reason. Today's update, build 17A5522g, is only a very minor increment from the 17A5522f build of the original release, but Apple appears to be pushing it out for all devices, not just the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus that had not originally received it.

Registered developers will need to download the profile for the iOS 13 and iPadOS betas from Apple's Developer Center. The revised Beta 3 can be downloaded over-the-air once the proper profile has been installed.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Releases Second Public Betas of iOS 13 and iPadOS

Apple today released the second public betas of iOS 13 and iPadOS to its public beta testing group, two weeks after seeding the first public betas and a week after the third developer beta. The public beta gives non-developers a chance to test out iOS 13 ahead of its upcoming fall launch date.

Beta testers who have signed up for Apple's beta testing program will receive the iOS 13 beta update over-the-air after installing the proper certificate on an iOS device.


Those who want to join the beta testing program can sign up on Apple's beta testing website, which gives users access to iOS, macOS, and tvOS betas. Before installing a beta, make sure to create a full encrypted iTunes backup or an iCloud backup. It's best to install iOS 13 on a secondary device because beta software is not always stable and can include bugs.

iOS 13 is a major update to the iOS operating system that runs on the iPhone and the iPad, but this year, iOS 13 and iPadOS, the version of iOS 13 that runs on the iPad, are separate downloads as they've been split up.


iPadOS is identical to iOS 13 in almost every way, though there are some iPad-specific features such as new multitasking capabilities. For the most part, the two operating systems share the same features.

iOS 13 introduces a long list of new features. Dark Mode changes the entire look of the operating system, shifting it from light to dark, while an overhauled Photos app makes it easier to relive your memories with new Days, Months, and Years viewing options.


There's a new photo editing interface that makes it easier to edit photos than ever before, plus there are new tools to work with and options to edit the intensity of the built-in filters. You can edit video right in the Photos app for the first time, and on the newest iPhones, there's a new High-Key Mono lighting effect and an option to adjust the intensity of Portrait Lightning effects.

There's a less obtrusive volume HUD, a new Find My app that combines Find My iPhone and Find My Friends and lets you track your devices even with they don't have an LTE or WiFi connection. A Sign In with Apple feature (not yet active) gives you a convenient and data safe way to sign into apps and websites, providing an alternative to Facebook and Google sign in options.


Maps has a new street-level "Look Around" mode and a Collections feature for making lists of places, Reminders has been entirely overhauled to make it more functional, there's a profile feature in Messages along with new Memoji and Animoji stickers, and Siri has a new voice.

There are a ton of additional new features and changes coming in iOS 13, and for a full rundown of what you can expect, make sure to check out our iOS 13 roundup.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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iOS 13: Everything You Need to Know About Apple’s Find My App

Apple in iOS 13 and iPadOS merged the Find My Friends and the Find My iPhone apps into one app that's just called "Find My," because, well, it's used for finding whatever you need to find.

Find My works similarly to the Find My iPhone and Find My Friends apps that were previously available, but it has a nifty new feature that's designed to let you find your lost devices even when you don't have a WiFi or LTE connection.

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Note that this guide is designed to walk through all of the Find My features on iPhone and iPad, but it also applies to the Mac, which also has a new Find My app in macOS Catalina.


Locating Lost Devices


The Find My app is organized into three sections, accessible by tapping the tabs at the bottom. On the left, you can find people, in the middle, you can find your own devices, and on the right, there's a "Me" tab introduced during the beta testing process.

As with the prior Find My iPhone app, all of your Apple products are listed. Devices where you're signed into iCloud and have the Find My feature enabled will be locatable through the Find My app.


All of your devices are displayed on a map, and you can zoom in or out to get a better picture of their location. Tapping on a single device provides you with options to get directions to its location in Apple Maps, Play a Sound for locating a nearby lost device, or get a notification when it's found if it's offline.


There's an option to mark a device as lost, which locks the lost device, disables Apple Pay, and allows contact information to be put right on the lock screen, and as a last resort, there's a tool for deleting all of your data.

Find My Compatible Devices


Almost all Apple products are Find My compatible, including iPhone, iPad, Macs, Apple Watch, and AirPods.

Family Sharing


If you have Family Sharing enabled, all of your family's devices will be listed in Find My right alongside your own, so you can also find devices from your partner or children through the Find My app.

Locating Friends


The Find My app allows you to locate friends and family members that have shared their location with you. You can view their location using the "People" tab within the Find My app.

The Find My app lists people who have shared their location with you and, if you haven't shared your own location, offers up an option to do so.


Sharing Location


If you press the "Share My Location" button, you can share your own location with any of your contacts even if they haven't shared a location with you. Tapping on a person's name in the list provides an option to bring up their Contacts card for sending a message or an option to get directions to their location.

You'll also find tools for removing friends and turning off your own location sharing with the person if it's a mutual location sharing contact. You can opt to share your own location permanently, for an hour, or until the end of the day.

Notifications


For any person who's sharing a location with you, you can turn on notifications to get notifications when they leave or arrive at a specific location. There's also an option to notify your friend when you leave or arrive at a specific notification.

Me Tab


The "Me" tab in the Find My app displays your current location and includes toggles for sharing location, allowing friend requests, choosing who to receive location updates from, and naming a specific place.


Locating Devices Without a Connection


One of the headline features of iOS 13 is a new Find My option that lets your lost devices be located even when not connected to WiFi or LTE by leveraging Bluetooth and proximity to other nearby Apple devices.

When your lost device is offline but close to another device, it's able to connect to that other device over Bluetooth and relay its location. That means that your devices are more trackable than ever, and there's a better chance you can find a device that's been lost.

The iPad Pro and MacBook in this screenshot are locatable without a connection. The iPad Pro has WiFi turned off while the MacBook was closed.

Tracking a device in this way requires Bluetooth to be enabled because location is shared with another device using Bluetooth. Turning off Bluetooth or power makes your device untrackable, but if it's on, has Bluetooth, and is near another Apple device, it will potentially be trackable even if it can't connect to WiFi or LTE.

You're not going to notice a difference in the Find My app when tracking a device over Bluetooth rather than a cellular or WiFi connection -- it simply shows up in the list of devices like any other device that does have a standard connection. Offline devices do have their distance from you listed in gray instead of blue, and you can tell when the location data was last updated by the time listed.

In testing, setting an iPad into Airplane mode and enabling Bluetooth continued to allow the iPad to be tracked thanks to another nearby iPhone, but turning off Bluetooth prevented it from being found even from a device to device connection.

How It Works


Implementing the device to device location feature while preserving privacy was quite a feat and the technical details of how it works are quite complicated, but Apple has given a high level overview of how it functions.

Basically, it's been designed with an encryption system that prevents people from abusing the feature for doing things like tracking you. That encryption system makes your personal location unavailable to people aiming to intercept your device's Bluetooth signal and from Apple itself.

Find My requires Apple users to have at least two devices. Each of your devices emits a constantly changing public key that nearby Apple devices pick up, encrypt, and upload with your geolocation data.

To decrypt that location signal, you need a second Apple device logged in with your Apple ID credentials and protected with two-factor authentication. Essentially, only your own devices can decrypt the encrypted location signal that's being sent from a lost device, no one, not even Apple, can intercept it and locate you or your devices.

As an example scenario, if you were on an airplane, had your iPhone in Airplane Mode with Bluetooth on, and then left it behind on the plane accidentally, it would potentially still be trackable.

In this situation, a flight attendant or an airport worker with an iPhone might come across it. The flight attendant's own iPhone would connect to your lost iPhone over Bluetooth by picking up your public key.

The flight attendant's iPhone would then upload your device's encrypted location and a hash of your public key (for identification purposes) to Apple's servers, where one of your own devices will be able to receive the encrypted info and decrypt it to make the offline device able to be tracked.

Privacy


Because the entire Find My system is end-to-end encrypted, other people can't get the location of your devices using Bluetooth, nor can Apple. Lost devices are trackable only by you.

Device Impact


According to Apple, Find My's background Bluetooth location tracking feature uses just tiny bits of data piggybacked on existing network traffic so there's no impact on device battery life, data usage, or privacy.

Find My Rumors


Rumors have suggested Apple plans to expand Find My's functionality through the introduction of a new hardware product that's similar to the Tile Bluetooth item tracker.

Apple is said to be working on a tag that can be attached to any item that would allow it to be tracked. Like Tile, Apple's rumored tracker reportedly lets users receive a notification when a device gets too far from the tag, potentially cutting down on lost items.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Find My, know of a feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Testing the New FaceTime Attention Correction Feature in iOS 13

The most recent beta of iOS 13 was released yesterday, and it brought an interesting new "FaceTime Attention Correction" feature that changes the way that FaceTime works.

FaceTime Attention Correction, when enabled, adjusts the set of your eyes so that it looks like you're making eye contact with the person you're FaceTiming even when you're looking at the iPhone's screen rather than the camera itself. It's a little difficult to explain, so we've made a hands-on video to demo how it works.

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When you're using FaceTime, you naturally want to look at the display to see the other person you're talking to rather than the camera, which has the effect of making you look like you're not maintaining eye contact.

As can be seen in the video, iOS 13 corrects this and makes it so that when you're looking at the iPhone's screen, your gaze appears to be on the camera, allowing eye contact to maintained be maintained while still letting you keep your gaze on the friend or family member you're FaceTiming with.

In iOS 12 and with FaceTime Attention Correction disabled, FaceTime looks like it always does - with no direct eye contact.

FaceTime Attention Correction appears to use an ARKit depth map captured through the front-facing TrueDepth camera to adjust where your eyes are looking for a more personal and natural connection with the person that you're talking to.

Twitter users have discovered the slight eye warping that Apple is using to enable the feature, which can be seen when an object like the arm of a pair of glasses is placed over the eyes.

You can access FaceTime Attention Correction on iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, iPhone XR, and 2018 iPad Pro models running the third developer beta of iOS 13. It's a setting that's available in the FaceTime section of the Settings app.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Attention Correction Feature in iOS 13 Beta Enables Appearance of Eye Contact During FaceTime Calls

A new feature in the latest iOS 13 beta makes users appear as if they're looking directly at the camera to make eye contact during FaceTime calls, when actually they're looking away from the camera at the image of the other person in the corner of their screen.


The FaceTime Correction Feature as demoed by Will Simon (@Wsig)

The new "FaceTime Attention Correction" feature, first spotted by Mike Rundle on Twitter, can be turned on and off in the FaceTime section of the Settings app, although it only appears to work on iPhone XS and XS Max devices in the third iOS 13 beta sent out to developers on Tuesday.

Why the feature is limited to these devices right now remains unknown. It clearly relies on some form of image manipulation to achieve its results, so maybe the software algorithms require the more advanced processing power of Apple's latest devices.

Rundle predicted in 2017 that FaceTime attention correction would be introduced by Apple in "years to come," but its apparent inclusion in iOS 13, due to be released this fall, has surprised and impressed him.

For more details on the many features coming to iPhones with iOS 13, be sure to check out our comprehensive MacRumors roundup.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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