Rumor Claims iOS 14 to Support All the Same iPhones as iOS 13

Apple is likely to announce iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June, and a new rumor claims the next major version of iOS will support the same iPhone models as iOS 13, while ‌iPadOS‌ 14 will trim its compatible devices list.


According to French site iPhoneSoft.fr, iOS 14 will continue to support the ‌iPhone‌ SE, the ‌iPhone‌ 6s and ‌iPhone‌ 6s Plus, and all newer devices that Apple has released since. That would include the following:

  • ‌iPhone 8‌ Plus

  • ‌iPhone‌ 7

  • ‌iPhone‌ 7 Plus

  • ‌iPhone‌ 6s

  • ‌iPhone‌ 6s Plus

  • ‌iPhone‌ SE

  • iPod touch (7th generation)

The site qualifies its claim by suggesting the list is not final, and that the ‌iPhone‌ SE and ‌iPhone‌ 6s could get bumped off it because of the introduction of Apple's next-generation iPhone 12 models, expected in September, and the so-called "iPhone 9" or "iPhone SE 2" that's rumored to be arriving as early as this March.

Over on the iPad front, the site's source claims that Apple will drop support for the ‌iPad‌ mini 4, originally released in September 2015, and the ‌iPad‌ Air 2, released in October 2014. That would leave the following devices supported by ‌iPadOS‌:
  • 12.9-inch iPad Pro

  • 11-inch ‌iPad Pro‌

  • 10.5-inch ‌iPad Pro‌

  • 9.7-inch ‌iPad Pro‌

  • ‌iPad‌ (7th generation)

  • ‌iPad‌ (6th generation)

  • ‌iPad‌ (5th generation)

  • ‌iPad‌ mini (5th generation)

  • iPad Air (3rd generation)

This isn't the first time iPhoneSoft.fr has made predictions about the device compatibility list of future iOS versions. In May 2019, the French blog claimed ‌iOS 13‌ would drop support for the ‌iPhone‌ SE, but that turned out to be incorrect. However, it did accurately predict that ‌iOS 13‌ would not support the ‌iPhone‌ 5s, ‌iPhone‌ 6 and ‌iPhone‌ 6 Plus.

Apple is likely to prioritize access to services in iOS 14, with Apple Arcade, Apple TV+, Apple News and Apple Music becoming ever more important revenue streams for the company, so it would make sense for Apple's mobile software to continue supporting a wide range of devices.

Rumors suggest Apple will add a laser-powered time-of-flight 3D rear camera to the next iPad Pro models and the ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro, which will bring significant improvements in augmented reality experiences.

These new hardware capabilities are also likely to feature prominently in iOS 14. Whether that means it will still be practicable to maintain compatibility with the same devices as ‌iOS 13‌ remains to be seen.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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New Figures Suggest Apple’s Location Privacy Controls in iOS 13 Are Working

location iconSince the launch of iOS 13 last fall, third-party access to users' background location data has reportedly declined by 68 percent, according to Location Sciences, a firm that analyzes location data for marketers (via Fast Company).

The firm also found that foreground data sharing, which occurs only while an app is open, has fallen by 24 percent.

According to a separate report by Digiday, third-party apps are now seeing opt-in rates under 50 percent for collecting location data when they're not in use.

The shortage of GPS data has been put down to Apple's recently introduction of pop-up options that let users selectively control background location tracking on the fly.

In ‌iOS 13‌, iPhone and iPad users are periodically reminded about apps that are continuously tracking their location, complete with a map of those locations and options to "Change to Only While Using," "Always Allow," and "Just Once."

"As those particular options were made available to users, we do attribute that to the decrease in sharing," Jason Smith, Location Sciences' chief business officer, told Fast Company.

While the report indicates that Apple's new background location tracking options are having their intended effect, a recent report by The Wall Street Journal suggests that some developers are concerned that frequent location tracking reminders will hurt adoption of their apps.

Apple responded to the report by insisting that the changes were made to further safeguard user privacy.

"Apple has not built a business model around knowing a customer's location or the location of their device," an Apple spokesperson told WSJ, adding that Apple builds its hardware and software with privacy in mind.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Seeds Third Betas of iOS 13.3.1 and iPadOS 13.3.1 to Developers

Apple today seeded the third betas of upcoming iOS and iPadOS 13.3.1 updates to developers, one week after seeding the second betas and more than a month after the release of iOS 13.3 with Communication Limits for Screen Time.

iOS and ‌iPadOS‌ 13.3.1 can be downloaded from the Apple Developer center or over the air once the proper developer profile has been installed.


iOS 13.3.1 includes a "Networking & Wireless" toggle that turns off the U1 Ultra Wideband chip in the latest iPhones. The feature, located in the Privacy > Location Services section of the Settings app, turns off location for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and Ultra Wideband.

Apple added this location toggle after it was discovered that the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max continue to track user location even when location services options are disabled. This is because there are international regulatory requirements that mandate the U1 chip be disabled in certain locations.

The new toggle makes sure location tracking is off for the U1 chip at all times. Apple has also added a new "Play Again" button when replaying content that you've already watched in the TV app.

Along with these features, the iOS 13.3.1 update also likely includes bug fixes for issues unable to be addressed in the iOS 13.3 update. Specifically, it could address some issues with Communication Limits, fixing a workaround with the Contacts app that allowed children text someone who contacted them from an unknown number.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Latest iOS 13.3.1 Beta Includes Toggle for Disabling U1 Ultra Wideband Chip

The second beta of iOS 13.3.1, released earlier this month, includes a toggle for disabling the Ultra Wideband chip in the device.

Found by Twitter user Brandon Butch (via 9to5Mac), the toggle can be found by opening up the Settings app, selecting Privacy, choosing Location Services, selecting System Services, and then toggling off the "Networking & Wireless" option.


Disabling this feature warns that Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and Ultra Wideband performance will be affected.

Apple added this toggle in the beta after it was discovered that the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max continue to track user location even when location services toggles are disabled.

Apple said that this was expected behavior due to the Ultra Wideband chip and that the iPhone was operating as designed explaining that location data needed to be used because there are international regulatory requirements that mandate the U1 chip be disabled in certain locations.
Ultra wideband technology is an industry standard technology and is subject to international regulatory requirements that require it to be turned off in certain locations. iOS uses Location Services to help determine if ‌‌iPhone‌‌ is in these prohibited locations in order to disable ultra wideband and comply with regulations.

The management of ultra wideband compliance and its use of location data is done entirely on the device and Apple is not collecting user location data.
Apple at the time promised to add a toggle to allow customers to disable the U1 chip entirely, and that toggle will be available to everyone after the release of iOS 13.3.1.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Seeds Second Betas of iOS 13.3.1 and iPadOS 13.3.1 to Developers

Apple today seeded the second betas of upcoming iOS and iPadOS 13.3.1 updates to developers, almost a month after seeding the first betas and several weeks after the release of iOS 13.3 with Communication Limits for Screen Time.

iOS and ‌iPadOS‌ 13.3.1 can be downloaded from the Apple Developer center or over the air once the proper developer profile has been installed.


There's no word yet on what's in the iOS 13.3.1 update, but it likely includes bug fixes for issues unable to be addressed in the iOS 13.3 update. Specifically, it could address some issues with Communication Limits, fixing a workaround with the Contacts app that allowed children text someone who contacted them from an unknown number.

No notable new features were found in the first betas of iOS and ‌iPadOS‌ 13.3.1, but we'll update this article should anything new be found in the second betas.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Responds to Report on iOS 13’s Frequent Location Tracking Reminders, Emphasizes Privacy

As of iOS 13, apps are no longer able to present an "always allow" option when requesting access to a user's location. The only way to immediately grant an app continuous access to location is to navigate to Settings > Privacy > Location Services, tap on an app, and select the "always" option if available.

iOS 13 also periodically reminds users about apps that are continuously tracking their location, complete with a map of those locations. An on-screen alert provides users with options to continue to "always allow" ongoing access to their location or to limit access to while the app is being used.


In light of those changes, The Wall Street Journal today reported that some developers are concerned that the location tracking reminders will hurt adoption of their apps, while some iPhone users are said to have expressed frustration that the reminders appear every few days despite repeatedly selecting "always allow."

Apple responded to the report with a statement insisting that the changes were made to further safeguard user privacy.

"Apple has not built a business model around knowing a customer's location or the location of their device," an Apple spokesperson told The Wall Street Journal, adding that Apple builds its hardware and software with privacy in mind.

The amount of location data collected by apps while in the background has dropped by 70 percent since iOS 13 was released, according to Jason Smith, chief business officer of data intelligence company Location Sciences. Given how easily the data can be used to identify and track individuals, that is a promising sign.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Apple Seeds First Betas of iOS 13.3.1 and iPadOS 13.3.1 to Developers

Apple today seeded the first betas of upcoming iOS and iPadOS 13.3.1 updates to developers, one week after the release of iOS 13.3 with Communication Limits for Screen Time.

iOS and ‌iPadOS‌ 13.3.1 can be downloaded from the Apple Developer center or over the air once the proper developer profile has been installed.


There's no word yet on what's included in the iOS 13.3.1 update, but it likely includes bug fixes for issues unable to be addressed in the iOS 13.3 update. Specifically, it could address some issues with Communication Limits, fixing a workaround with the Contacts app that allowed children text someone who contacted them from an unknown number.

Once we download the update and take a look at what's new, we'll update this article.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Using Voice Control in iOS 13 to Operate an iPhone Hands-Free

Apple in iOS 13 added a Voice Control feature as an Accessibility option designed for those who need to use their iPhones and iPads without their hands. It allows for complete control of the operating system using voice commands.

Voice Control is designed for people who need an alternative to physical control, but it has the potential to be useful even for those can use their devices with their hands. Check out our latest YouTube video below to see Voice Control in action, and read on to see how to enable it and what it can do.

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How to Enable Voice Control


Voice Control can be turned on in the Settings app by following these instructions:

  1. Open up the Settings app.

  2. Scroll down to Accessibility and tap it.

  3. Select the Voice Control option.

  4. Tap on Set Up Voice Control.

The setup screen for Voice Control will walk you through the different things you can do with your voice, which ranges from opening apps and adjusting settings to tapping buttons and dictating and editing text.

After tapping on Set Up and checking out the various options, Voice Control will be toggled on.

What Voice Control Can Do


With Voice Control enabled, there's a little microphone icon that's active and visible on the iPhone's display. When Voice Control is active, you don't need to invoke Siri or use any other kind of wake word to navigate the ‌iPhone‌.

Simple commands like "Open Settings" work to open up an app, and then you can navigate by saying things like "Go Back." You do need to learn the specific commands for control, which can take some time. Selecting an item in the Settings app, for example, requires saying "Tap Accessibility" rather than "Select" or "Choose."

Voice Control is a powerful tool and it can do almost anything that you can do with physical access. A sample list is below:

  • Swipe left, right, up, or down on the screen

  • Zoom, scroll, rotate, two finger tap, long press, pan up/down, double tap

  • Tap items on the screen

  • Open Control Center

  • Open Notification Center

  • Open third-party apps like Twitter

  • Start a new tweet, add text, and send the tweet

  • Show numbers (to add little numbers to items in a list)

  • Tap number (to tap one of the numbered items - you can also just say the number without tap)

  • Show grid (adds a grid to the screen with numbers so you can tap a specific spot on the screen)

  • Show names (displays app or item names)

  • Open Notes

  • Tap New Note

  • Select that/all/[specific phrase]

  • Copy [text]/Paste [text]

  • Drag and drop

  • Tap and hold

  • Type [phrase]

  • Go Home

  • Go back

  • Open ‌Siri‌

  • Search web for [phrase]

  • Go to sleep

  • Take screenshot

  • Reboot

  • Open Apple Pay


You can do specific sequences within apps for things that would normally require hand control. Here's an example Voice Control sequence in the Messages app:

  1. Open Messages

  2. Tap [person's name]

  3. Tap iMessage

  4. Speak your text (whenever a keyboard is showing on the screen, whatever you speak will be typed in)

  5. Tap emoji

  6. Show numbers

  7. Tap 25 (heart eyes emoji)

  8. Tap Send

That's the entire Voice Control sequence to type out a message with an included emoji and send it out to someone. The "Show numbers" command is super useful in situations where there are a lot of options on the screen (such as the emoji list) and you need to choose one.

Here's a similar sequence in the Notes app, using voice commands:

  1. Open Notes

  2. Tap new Note

  3. Speak your title

  4. Tap return

  5. Speak your text

  6. Period

For editing in Notes:

  1. Select [phrase]

  2. Copy selection

  3. Show grid

  4. Tap number (where the cursor should be)

  5. Paste that

  6. Tap done

  7. Go Home

There are tons of Voice Control commands to work with, which can all be seen by going to Settings > Accessibility > Voice Control > Customize Commands or simply saying "Show Commands" with Voice Control turned on. Apple also has a support document that's worth checking out if you want to get deeper into using Voice Control.

It will take some time to learn all of the appropriate commands and then to create custom commands that fill in the missing gaps that are needed when it comes to control, but the effort will be well worth it for those who need this functionality.

Voice Control Options


There are several customization options for Voice Control, located in the Voice Control section of the Settings app as outlined above.

You can create custom commands, selecting an activation phrase, an action such as insert text or run a Shortcut, and an app for that custom phrase to work with. Voice Control integrates with Shortcuts, which means it's highly customizable and extremely powerful for those who need to use it for most ‌iPhone‌ and iPad functions.

For the insert text customization, for example, you can create a "home address" option that enters your home address whenever the phrase is spoken, useful for filling out forms.

There are also options to turn off various functions if something specific needs to be turned off or if you want to enable features not turned on by default such as music controls or making phone calls.

Through the "Vocabulary" section" you can teach Voice Control new words simply by tapping the "+" button and adding a phrase that Voice Control should recognize.

Settings for confirmation, playing sounds when a command is recognized, and showing usage hints can also be toggled on or off, with the latter option being particularly useful for those who are new to Voice Control.

Availability


Voice Control is an ‌iOS 13‌ feature available on iPhones and iPads, but it's also available in macOS Catalina for those who want to control their Macs with their voice.

People who are able to control their iPhones with their hands or another physical manner may find Voice Control to be difficult and tedious to use, but it is an incredibly powerful and thorough option for those who have limited dexterity or mobility.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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How to Set Communication Limits on Your Child’s Allowed Screen Time and Downtime on iPhone and iPad

screen timeIn iOS 13.3, Apple added new Communication Limits to its Screen Time options, which let parents control who their children are able to contact.

If you're not familiar with Apple's Screen Time functions, they enable users to keep track of their device usage and place self-imposed limits on the time they spend using their iPhone or iPad. Screen Time also serves as a parental control system for parents.

The latest feature addition, Communication Limits, lets parents manage who their children are able to contact through FaceTime, Phone, Messages, and iCloud Contacts.

The new options allow contacts only or everyone to be contacted during a child's allotted Screen Time, and there's a toggle that either allows or prevents people from being added to a group chat when a contact or family member is in the group.

There's also a separate setting for communication limits during downtime, which can be set to allow everyone or just specific contacts. Follow the steps below to set your preferences for your child's Screen Time and Downtime.

How to Set Communication Limits During Allowed Screen Time in iOS


  1. Launch the Settings app on your ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌.

  2. Tap Screen Time.

  3. Tap Communication Limits.
    settings
  4. Tap During Allowed Screen Time.

  5. Under Allowed Communication, select Everyone or Contacts Only.

  6. To allow people to be added to group conversations when an ‌iCloud‌ contact or a family member is in the same group, tap the toggle next to Allow Introductions in Groups so that it's in the green ON position.
    settings

How to Set Communication Limits During Downtime in iOS


  1. Launch the Settings app on your ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌.

  2. Tap Screen Time.

  3. Tap Communication Limits.
    settings
  4. Tap During Downtime.

  5. Tap Specific Contacts.

  6. Tap Choose From My Contacts and select the people that can be contacted during downtime, then tap Done. If the person you want to allow to be contacted isn't in your contacts, tap Add New Contact and enter their details in a new contact card, then tap Done.
    settings
Note that calls to emergency numbers are always allowed and when placed, will turn off communication limits for 24 hours to make sure children are safe and not prevented from communicating with people in the event of an emergency.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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‘Powerbeats4’ With ‘Hey Siri’ Support Referenced in iOS 13.3 Code

Apple appears to be working on new "Powerbeats4" wireless earphones to replace the existing Powerbeats3, based on strings in iOS 13.3 code uncovered by MacRumors contributor Steve Moser.

Powerbeats3

9to5Mac was first to discover the Powerbeats4 reference, noting that the earphones will likely support hands-free "Hey Siri." This means the Powerbeats4 will likely have an Apple-designed H1 chip or newer, which delivers a faster and more stable wireless connection to your devices.

With the H1 chip, the Powerbeats4 would likely support "Announce Messages with Siri." When enabled, Siri reads your incoming messages out loud when your earphones are connected to your iPhone or iPad running iOS 13.2 or iPadOS 13.2 or later, you're wearing them, and your device is locked. Siri plays a tone, then announces the sender's name and reads the message.

Apple already released totally wireless Powerbeats Pro with "Hey Siri" support earlier this year for a regular price of $249.95. Powerbeats4 would likely be a cheaper version of the earphones and will presumably stick with the cord between the left and right earphone like the Powerbeats3, which retail for $199.95.

It is unclear if and when Apple will release the Powerbeats4 or if that will be the final consumer-facing name of the earphones.

iOS 13.3 was released yesterday.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS
Tag: Beats

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