Amid ‘Apple Tag’ Rumors, Tile Announces New 3M Adhesive ‘Sticker’ and Updated ‘Slim’ Electronic Trackers

Amid rumors that Apple is developing a Tile-like accessory that will help users keep track of their personal belongings, Tile today announced a new smart tracker called the Sticker, along with an updated Tile Slim.


About the size of a quarter, the Tile Sticker is the company's smallest tracker to date, and features waterproofing and a 3M adhesive backing for attaching it to most metal and plastic objects, including remote controls, cameras, and outdoor gear. The Tile Sticker is available in black and in twin packs for $39.99, or a pack of four for $59.99.

Meanwhile, the Tile Slim assumes a new compact form factor that's the shape and thinness of a credit card. It also now features a three-year battery life, a speaker that's twice as loud as the previous model, and a 200-foot range. The Tile Slim also comes in black and costs $29.99 for a single device.


In addition, Tile's most popular tags – the Mate and Pro – have had their ranges extended to 400 feet. The Tile Mate costs $24.99 and the Tile Pro can be had for $34.99. All Tile trackers are available today from Tile's website, Amazon, and other retailers.

Based on assets discovered in iOS 13 by MacRumors, Apple's equivalent electronic tracker accessory is expected to be a small, circular tag with an Apple logo in the center.

The tags will be closely integrated with the new Find My app in iOS 13 and macOS Catalina, which merged Apple's previous Find My iPhone and Find My Friends services into one.

Apple Tags concept by MacRumors

While not available in public betas of iOS 13, the internal build contains a new "Items" tab in the Find My app for iPhone and iPad, which allows users to track the location of personal belongings.

Noted Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has said he expects Apple's tags to feature ultra-wideband or "UWB" technology, which can be found in the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max.

Ultra-wideband is a short-range, low-power radio technology that is able to provide more precise indoor positioning than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi, suggesting that Apple's tags will be more accurate at pinpointing the location of lost items than Tile's current item trackers, which rely on Bluetooth LE.

Apple's tagging products went unmentioned at its September 10 event, but it's possible the company could make some sort of announcement soon, possibly during an October event.

Apple has several rumored products in its pipeline that could make an appearance as early as this month, including a 16-inch MacBook Pro with a scissor keyboard and an all-new design, refreshed iPad Pro models that will possibly sport triple-lens rear camera systems, and a refreshed Apple TV.

Tags: Tile, Find My

This article, "Amid 'Apple Tag' Rumors, Tile Announces New 3M Adhesive 'Sticker' and Updated 'Slim' Electronic Trackers" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Exclusive: iOS 13’s Hidden ‘Items’ Tab for ‘Apple Tags’ Revealed

MacRumors has obtained never-before-seen screenshots of a new "Items" tab that Apple is developing for its Find My app in iOS 13. This tab is not available in the public version of the software update released today.

Similar to the existing "People" and "Devices" tabs in the Find My app, the "Items" tab will display a map at the top and a list of items associated with a user's Apple ID account at the bottom. The existing "Me" tab in the Find My app will be relocated to an avatar hovering over the map in all tabs.


The new "Items" tab will be closely integrated with Apple's rumored Tile-like item tracking tags, codenamed "B389" internally. By tapping the "Add" button in the tab, users will be able to track the location of items affixed with so-called Apple Tags directly within the Find My app.

The tab informs users to "tag your everyday items with B389 and never lose them again," making it clear that Apple is working on a Tile competitor. MacRumors shared an image of Apple's tag from an internal build of iOS 13 last month, although it may not reflect the final design of the product.


MacRumors also shared a similar screenshot of the "Items" tab last month, but these screenshots provide a more detailed view.

iPhone users will receive a notification when they are separated from a tagged item, according to strings in the internal build of iOS 13. If necessary, users can then tap a button in the Find My app that will cause Apple's tag to start chiming loudly to help them locate the lost item.

If users are unable to find an item, they can place the attached tag into a "Lost Mode." Then, if another iPhone user comes across the lost item, they will be able to view contact info for the item's owner and contact them by phone or text message. The item's owner will be immediately notified.

"Safe Locations" can be set where a user will not be notified if an item is left in certain locations, and users will also be able to share the location of items with friends and family members, per the internal build of iOS 13.

Last month, MacRumors reported that augmented reality will likely play a role in Apple's item tracking functionality.

Like the Pixie Tracker, the Find My app will likely incorporate features from Apple's ARKit framework. The internal build of iOS 13 includes an asset for a 3D red balloon that could help a user pinpoint a lost item after scanning a room with their iPhone. There's also an image of a 2D orange balloon.


"Walk around several feet and move your iPhone up and down until a balloon comes into view," reads a string in internal iOS 13 code.

The internal build of iOS 13 containing these leaked images and screenshots is from early June, so we cannot guarantee that the "Items" tab or all of the details presented above will be exactly as described. We also cannot guarantee that Apple will ever release the tags, but it has certainly been working on them.

Apple did not announce its Tile competitor at its September event earlier this month, but it could unveil the tags at a potential October event or beyond.


This article, "Exclusive: iOS 13's Hidden 'Items' Tab for 'Apple Tags' Revealed" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Kuo: ‘Apple Tags’ to Feature Ultra-Wideband Technology, Likely Far More Precise Than Tile’s Trackers

Last week, MacRumors revealed new details about Apple's upcoming Tile competitor, with internal iOS 13 code suggesting that Apple plans to release small, circular "tags" that can be attached to electronic devices, backpacks, keys, and other personal belongings to keep track of their locations.

Apple Tags concept by MacRumors

Now, noted Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has thrown his weight behind this rumor. In a Chinese-language research note with TF International Securities today, Kuo said he expects Apple's tags to feature ultra-wideband or "UWB" technology. As he has said previously, Kuo also expects all three 2019 iPhones to support UWB.

Ultra-wideband is a short-range, low-power radio technology that is able to provide more precise indoor positioning than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi, suggesting that Apple's tags will be more accurate at pinpointing the location of lost items than Tile's current item trackers, which rely on Bluetooth LE.

The distance between two UWB devices — such as an upcoming iPhone and Apple Tag — can be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between the two devices, according to Electronic Design, which notes that UWB is up to 100× more accurate than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi:
In practice, UWB signals are able to effectively measure distance between two devicesNo with 5- to 10-cm accuracy, compared to roughly 5-m accuracy for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. When implemented in a system of fixed beacons tracking tag locations, the locations can be calculated to within 10-cm accuracy.
It is unclear if Apple's tags will rely solely on UWB, which would seemingly limit their compatibility to 2019 and newer iPhones, or if they will also incorporate Bluetooth LE for use with older devices.

Last week, MacRumors revealed that Apple's tags will be closely integrated with the new "Find My" app in iOS 13, which merged the Find My iPhone and Find My Friends apps into one package. Specifically, Apple has been working on an "Items" tab in the app for tracking the location of Apple-tagged items.


iPhone users will receive a notification when they are separated from a tagged item, according to an internal version of the "Find My" app obtained by MacRumors. If necessary, users can then tap a button in the app that will cause Apple's tag to chime to help them locate the lost item.

"Safe Locations" can be set where the user will not be notified if this item is left in those locations, and users will also be able to share the location of items with friends and family members, based on internal iOS 13 code.

If users are unable to find an item, they can place the attached tag into a "Lost Mode." Then, if another iPhone user comes across the lost item, the owner will be instantly notified. The stranger will also be presented with the owner's contact information, possibly via push notification or in the Find My app.

Like the Pixie Tracker, the Find My app will likely incorporate functionality from Apple's ARKit platform. An internal build of iOS 13 includes an asset for a 3D red balloon that could help a user pinpoint a lost item after scanning a room with their iPhone. There's also an image of a 2D orange balloon.


"Walk around several feet and move your iPhone up and down until a balloon comes into view," a string in the internal Find My app bundle reads.

Apple is hosting an event at Steve Jobs Theater next Tuesday, where it is widely expected to unveil new iPhone and Apple Watch models. It certainly seems like development of Apple's tags has reached an advanced stage, but it is unclear if the product will be introduced at the keynote or later.


This article, "Kuo: 'Apple Tags' to Feature Ultra-Wideband Technology, Likely Far More Precise Than Tile's Trackers" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Exclusive: Apple’s Tile Competitor Will Include ‘Items’ Tab in iOS 13’s Find My App and Much More

Apple is developing a Tile-like accessory that will help users keep track of their personal belongings, such as their keys, wallets, and backpacks, according to an internal build of iOS 13 seen by MacRumors.

The internal build contains an image of the accessory that suggests it will be a small, circular tag with an Apple logo in the center, similar to many other Bluetooth trackers. The image could be a mockup or placeholder, however, so the final design of the tag may vary at least slightly.


This image looks similar to one shared by 9to5Mac's Guilherme Rambo, who was first to reveal Apple's plans for this product in April.

MacRumors can confirm the tags are codenamed "B389" within Apple, and there are many strings that are a dead giveaway as to what this product's purpose will be, such as "tag your everyday items with B389 and never lose them again."

The tags will be closely integrated with the new Find My app in iOS 13, which merged Apple's previous Find My iPhone and Find My Friends apps into one. While not available in public betas of iOS 13, the internal build contains a new "Items" tab in the Find My app for tracking the location of personal belongings.


Users will receive a notification when they are separated from a tagged item, according to strings in the internal Find My app bundle. If necessary, users can then tap a button in the Find My app that will cause Apple's tag to start emitting an audible chime to help locate the lost item.

"Safe Locations" can be set where the user will not be notified if this item is left in those locations, and users will also be able to share the location of items with friends and family members, based on iOS 13 strings.

If users are unable to find an item, they can place the attached tag into a "Lost Mode." Then, if another iPhone user comes across the lost item, they will be able to view contact info for the item's owner and contact them by phone or text message. Perhaps the stranger will be alerted with a Find My notification on their iPhone when they have found a lost item. The item's owner will also be notified.

After digging further into the code, we remain confident that augmented reality will play a role in Apple's item tracking feature.

Like the Pixie Tracker, the Find My app will likely incorporate functionality from Apple's ARKit platform. The internal build of iOS 13 includes an asset for a 3D red balloon that could help a user pinpoint a lost item after scanning a room with their iPhone. There's also an image of a 2D orange balloon.

"Walk around several feet and move your iPhone up and down until a balloon comes into view," a string in the internal Find My app bundle reads.


There are also strings that suggest Apple's tags will be equipped with a removable battery, which would likely be a button cell, aka the small, circular batteries found in many watches and the latest Tile trackers. A low battery warning appears to prompt the tag to send a final location of the item it is attached to.

"Unscrew the back of the item and remove the battery," another string in the internal Find My app bundle reads.

While we were not able to proceed any further with the "Items" tab, it should be similar to the "Devices" tab in the Find My app, with a map at the top and a list of items at the bottom. It is possible the "Me" tab will be relocated to an avatar hovering over the map, although there could simply end up being four tabs.

Here's the image that should appear in the "Items" tab prior to any items being added, in line with the "People" and "Devices" tabs when empty:


This internal build of iOS 13 is from June, so we cannot guarantee that the "Items" tab or all of the details presented above will be exactly as described. The icon for the "People" tab has already been tweaked slightly in subsequent iOS 13 betas, for example, so there will be at least some minor changes.

Apple is hosting a September 10 event at Steve Jobs Theater, where it is widely expected to unveil new iPhone and Apple Watch models, but it is unclear if its item tracker tags will be unveiled at that time or later.

Tag: Find My

This article, "Exclusive: Apple's Tile Competitor Will Include 'Items' Tab in iOS 13's Find My App and Much More" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

iOS 13: Everything You Need to Know About Apple’s Find My App

Apple in iOS 13 and iPadOS merged the Find My Friends and the Find My iPhone apps into one app that's just called "Find My," because, well, it's used for finding whatever you need to find.

Find My works similarly to the Find My iPhone and Find My Friends apps that were previously available, but it has a nifty new feature that's designed to let you find your lost devices even when you don't have a WiFi or LTE connection.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Note that this guide is designed to walk through all of the Find My features on iPhone and iPad, but it also applies to the Mac, which also has a new Find My app in macOS Catalina.


Locating Lost Devices


The Find My app is organized into three sections, accessible by tapping the tabs at the bottom. On the left, you can find people, in the middle, you can find your own devices, and on the right, there's a "Me" tab introduced during the beta testing process.

As with the prior Find My iPhone app, all of your Apple products are listed. Devices where you're signed into iCloud and have the Find My feature enabled will be locatable through the Find My app.


All of your devices are displayed on a map, and you can zoom in or out to get a better picture of their location. Tapping on a single device provides you with options to get directions to its location in Apple Maps, Play a Sound for locating a nearby lost device, or get a notification when it's found if it's offline.


There's an option to mark a device as lost, which locks the lost device, disables Apple Pay, and allows contact information to be put right on the lock screen, and as a last resort, there's a tool for deleting all of your data.

Find My Compatible Devices


Almost all Apple products are Find My compatible, including iPhone, iPad, Macs, Apple Watch, and AirPods.

Family Sharing


If you have Family Sharing enabled, all of your family's devices will be listed in Find My right alongside your own, so you can also find devices from your partner or children through the Find My app.

Locating Friends


The Find My app allows you to locate friends and family members that have shared their location with you. You can view their location using the "People" tab within the Find My app.

The Find My app lists people who have shared their location with you and, if you haven't shared your own location, offers up an option to do so.


Sharing Location


If you press the "Share My Location" button, you can share your own location with any of your contacts even if they haven't shared a location with you. Tapping on a person's name in the list provides an option to bring up their Contacts card for sending a message or an option to get directions to their location.

You'll also find tools for removing friends and turning off your own location sharing with the person if it's a mutual location sharing contact. You can opt to share your own location permanently, for an hour, or until the end of the day.

Notifications


For any person who's sharing a location with you, you can turn on notifications to get notifications when they leave or arrive at a specific location. There's also an option to notify your friend when you leave or arrive at a specific notification.

Me Tab


The "Me" tab in the Find My app displays your current location and includes toggles for sharing location, allowing friend requests, choosing who to receive location updates from, and naming a specific place.


Locating Devices Without a Connection


One of the headline features of iOS 13 is a new Find My option that lets your lost devices be located even when not connected to WiFi or LTE by leveraging Bluetooth and proximity to other nearby Apple devices.

When your lost device is offline but close to another device, it's able to connect to that other device over Bluetooth and relay its location. That means that your devices are more trackable than ever, and there's a better chance you can find a device that's been lost.

The iPad Pro and MacBook in this screenshot are locatable without a connection. The iPad Pro has WiFi turned off while the MacBook was closed.

Tracking a device in this way requires Bluetooth to be enabled because location is shared with another device using Bluetooth. Turning off Bluetooth or power makes your device untrackable, but if it's on, has Bluetooth, and is near another Apple device, it will potentially be trackable even if it can't connect to WiFi or LTE.

You're not going to notice a difference in the Find My app when tracking a device over Bluetooth rather than a cellular or WiFi connection -- it simply shows up in the list of devices like any other device that does have a standard connection. Offline devices do have their distance from you listed in gray instead of blue, and you can tell when the location data was last updated by the time listed.

In testing, setting an iPad into Airplane mode and enabling Bluetooth continued to allow the iPad to be tracked thanks to another nearby iPhone, but turning off Bluetooth prevented it from being found even from a device to device connection.

How It Works


Implementing the device to device location feature while preserving privacy was quite a feat and the technical details of how it works are quite complicated, but Apple has given a high level overview of how it functions.

Basically, it's been designed with an encryption system that prevents people from abusing the feature for doing things like tracking you. That encryption system makes your personal location unavailable to people aiming to intercept your device's Bluetooth signal and from Apple itself.

Find My requires Apple users to have at least two devices. Each of your devices emits a constantly changing public key that nearby Apple devices pick up, encrypt, and upload with your geolocation data.

To decrypt that location signal, you need a second Apple device logged in with your Apple ID credentials and protected with two-factor authentication. Essentially, only your own devices can decrypt the encrypted location signal that's being sent from a lost device, no one, not even Apple, can intercept it and locate you or your devices.

As an example scenario, if you were on an airplane, had your iPhone in Airplane Mode with Bluetooth on, and then left it behind on the plane accidentally, it would potentially still be trackable.

In this situation, a flight attendant or an airport worker with an iPhone might come across it. The flight attendant's own iPhone would connect to your lost iPhone over Bluetooth by picking up your public key.

The flight attendant's iPhone would then upload your device's encrypted location and a hash of your public key (for identification purposes) to Apple's servers, where one of your own devices will be able to receive the encrypted info and decrypt it to make the offline device able to be tracked.

Privacy


Because the entire Find My system is end-to-end encrypted, other people can't get the location of your devices using Bluetooth, nor can Apple. Lost devices are trackable only by you.

Device Impact


According to Apple, Find My's background Bluetooth location tracking feature uses just tiny bits of data piggybacked on existing network traffic so there's no impact on device battery life, data usage, or privacy.

Find My Rumors


Rumors have suggested Apple plans to expand Find My's functionality through the introduction of a new hardware product that's similar to the Tile Bluetooth item tracker.

Apple is said to be working on a tag that can be attached to any item that would allow it to be tracked. Like Tile, Apple's rumored tracker reportedly lets users receive a notification when a device gets too far from the tag, potentially cutting down on lost items.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about Find My, know of a feature we left out, or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

This article, "iOS 13: Everything You Need to Know About Apple's Find My App" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

How the ‘Find My’ App in iOS 13 and macOS Catalina Works

Apple at WWDC unveiled a new "Find My" app, which is available across its Mac and iOS platforms. Find My on iOS replaces Find My Friends and Find My iPhone, and on Mac, it introduces a native "Find" app for the first time as an alternative to using iCloud on the web.

Find My has a useful feature that's designed to let you locate your lost devices even when they're not connected to WiFi or a cellular network by leveraging nearby Bluetooth devices. Your lost iPhone, iPad, or Mac will be able to communicate via Bluetooth with any nearby Apple device, relaying its location right back to you.


Apple described the feature on stage on Monday, but today provided additional details to WIRED for those interested in an overview of just how it works.

Apple designed the Find My feature with privacy in mind. It uses an encryption system that prevents people from abusing it for tracking purposes, making your personal location unavailable to people aiming to intercept your device's Bluetooth signal and from Apple itself.

Apple's encryption solution requires "Find My" users to have at least two Apple devices. As relayed by Apple to WIRED, each device emits a constantly changing public key that nearby Apple devices use to encrypt and upload your geolocation data. Only other Apple devices that you own (and that are linked to your Apple ID and protected with two-step authentication) are able to decrypt those locations.

Because only your own devices can decrypt the encrypted location signal that's being sent from a lost device, no one, not even Apple, can intercept it and locate you or your devices.

Apple says that "Find My" uses just tiny bits of data piggybacked on existing network traffic so there's no impact on device battery life, data usage, or privacy. WIRED has a specific set of steps on how Find My works, from setup to what happens when a device is lost, which is worth checking out for those interested.

Basically, when a device you own goes missing, it's going to broadcast the aforementioned public key, which can be picked up by any other Apple device owned by anyone.
Say someone steals your MacBook. Even if the thief carries it around closed and disconnected from the internet, your laptop will emit its rotating public key via Bluetooth. A nearby stranger's iPhone, with no interaction from its owner, will pick up the signal, check its own location, and encrypt that location data using the public key it picked up from the laptop. The public key doesn't contain any identifying information, and since it frequently rotates, the stranger's iPhone can't link the laptop to its prior locations either.

The stranger's iPhone then uploads two things to Apple's server: The encrypted location, and a hash of the laptop's public key, which will serve as an identifier. Since Apple doesn't have the private key, it can't decrypt the location.
The Find My app is available in iOS 13, iPadOS, and macOS Catalina right now, but it's not going to be a fully functional system until these software updates are installed on millions of devices around the world.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS
Tag: Find My

This article, "How the 'Find My' App in iOS 13 and macOS Catalina Works" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Leaked iOS 13 Screenshots Reveal Dark Mode, Revamped Reminders App, and Merged ‘Find My’ App

Just days ahead of Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference, 9to5Mac's Guilherme Rambo has shared what he says are legitimate iOS 13 screenshots, revealing the software update's rumored systemwide Dark Mode, revamped Reminders app, new merged "Find My" app, and more.


Dark Mode can be enabled in the Settings app or in Control Center. On the home screen, the only noticeable change is the dock, which has a darker appearance. In apps, it appears that backgrounds will be true black under Dark Mode, which should lead to battery savings on iPhones with OLED displays.

A redesigned Reminders app on iPad is shown with a large sidebar with separate categories for Today, Scheduled, All, and Flagged. This new layout was first reported by Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.


The report claims the new "Find My" app has a large map, a list of the user's family and friends, and a separate tab for the user's own devices. The new icon and additional screenshots can be seen over at 9to5Mac.

WWDC 2019 kicks off with Apple's opening keynote on Monday at 10 a.m. Pacific Time, where the company is widely expected to take the wraps off iOS 13, macOS 10.15, watchOS 6, and tvOS 13. MacRumors will have full coverage of the event, including a live blog, so be sure to follow along next week.

Related Roundup: iOS 13

This article, "Leaked iOS 13 Screenshots Reveal Dark Mode, Revamped Reminders App, and Merged 'Find My' App" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums