Apple Introduces Teachers to Coding at Summer Workshops

Apple today highlighted various app prototypes that educators came up with during five weeklong Teacher Coding Academies it held this summer. The workshops were part of Apple's Community Education Initiative, which introduces coding opportunities to underrepresented communities across the United States.


Educators from nearly 70 institutions attended the first of these academies in Houston, Austin, Boise, Nashville, and Columbus, according to Apple, presenting prototypes of their apps to various community organizations. Together, the educators and community organizations plan to continue working on the apps.
In Boise, the teachers designed an app to help the police department better serve and communicate with the city's homeless population, connecting the community to open shelter beds and food banks.

In Austin, teachers focused on Ronald McDonald House, a charity that provides housing for families whose children are receiving critical medical care. In this case, they created an app prototype to help families communicate with the charity during their stay.

And in Columbus, the educators devised an app that helps firefighters log and monitor the amount of time they were exposed to dangerous carcinogens while on the job.
Learn more about the educators and their app prototypes on the Apple Newsroom.


This article, "Apple Introduces Teachers to Coding at Summer Workshops" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Tennessee State University Teams Up With Apple to Bolster Diversity in Coding

Tennessee State University last week launched the HBCU C2 Presidential Academy, a new initiative that's designed to expose students of color to coding and app development, reports The Tennessean.

The HBCU C2 Presidential Academy invited students from 14 historically black colleges and universities to learn from Apple. The program is designed to make sure that TSU and other HBCUs remain at the forefront of technology.

"The goal is to make sure HBCUs are not only up to date, but are creators and innovators of this new technology," said Robbie Melton, TSU's interim Dean of Graduates and Professional Studies and the initiative's main facilitator.

"Coding and app development is a growing part of the global workforce, and we want to help make sure people of color, especially our students, are equipped with the knowledge and skills to be competitive, and successful," said TSU President Glenda Glover.
Apple CEO Tim Cook this morning tweeted about the initiative, where students learned Swift using Apple's coding curriculum and were asked to think of applications that can better the community. Apple provided equipment, scholarships, and professional development services to TSU students as part of the effort.


Lisa Jackson, Apple's VP of environment, policy, and social initiatives, said that Apple is thrilled to be working with TSU and other HBCUs to expand coding opportunities to underrepresented groups.

"Students of all backgrounds should have the opportunity to learn to code," said Jackson. "We are proud to be part of a sustainable community network that is increasing access to teaching and learning."

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


This article, "Tennessee State University Teams Up With Apple to Bolster Diversity in Coding" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘I Don’t Think a Four-Year Degree is Necessary to Be Proficient at Coding’

Earlier this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook visited an Apple Store in Orlando, Florida to meet with 16-year-old Liam Rosenfeld, one of 350 scholarship winners who will be attending Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference next month.

Apple CEO Tim Cook, left, and WWDC 2019 scholar Liam Rosenfeld via TechCrunch

Echoing comments he shared with the Orlando Sentinel, Cook told TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino that it is "pretty impressive" what Rosenfeld is accomplishing with code at such a young age, serving as a perfect example of why he believes coding education should begin in the early grades of school.
"I don't think a four year degree is necessary to be proficient at coding" says Cook. "I think that's an old, traditional view. What we found out is that if we can get coding in in the early grades and have a progression of difficulty over the tenure of somebody's high school years, by the time you graduate kids like Liam, as an example of this, they're already writing apps that could be put on the App Store."
Cook made similar comments during an American Workforce Policy Advisory Board meeting at the White House earlier this year.

While in Florida, Cook attended a conference that saw SAP and Apple announce an expanded partnership focused on new enterprise apps taking advantage of technologies like machine learning and augmented reality.

Despite all of the technological advancements in recent years, Cook told Panzarino that many businesses have not "changed a whole lot" and are "still using very old technology." With more solutions like those from SAP and Apple, and tech-savvy employees of the future like Rosenfeld, that could change.
"I think what it is is they haven't embraced mobility. They haven't embraced machine learning. They haven't embraced AR. All of this stuff is a bit foreign in some way. They're still fixing employees to a desk. That's not the modern workplace," Cook says. "People that graduate from high school and get a little experience under their belt can do quite well in this job."
The full interview can be read on TechCrunch with an Extra Crunch subscription or in the Apple News app with an Apple News+ subscription.

WWDC 2019 begins June 3 in San Jose.

Related Roundup: WWDC 2019

This article, "Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'I Don't Think a Four-Year Degree is Necessary to Be Proficient at Coding'" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Launching Free ‘Hour of Code’ Sessions at Apple Retail Stores Starting December 1

Apple today announced that its annual Hour of Code event is set to take place from December 1 to December 14 at all of its retail locations around the world.

Apple customers can register for thousands of free Hour of Code sessions starting today. Hour of Code sessions are available for customers of all ages, with Kids Hour sessions available for aspiring coders aged six to 12.


Children will be able to explore coding using robots, while participants over 12 years of age will be able to attend sessions that use Swift Playgrounds and the iPad to learn coding concepts.

Signups for the Hour of Code sessions at Apple retail stores are available through the Today at Apple section of each retail store website.


Educators are able to host coding sessions in their own classrooms using Swift Playgrounds and Apple's new Hour of Code Facilitator Guide.

Apple is also introducing Swift Coding Club, a new program dedicated to teaching coding with Swift outside of the classroom. Students and mentors can access a new Swift Coding Club kit that provides students aged 8 and older with the ability to create apps and explore coding using Swift Playgrounds and App Development with Swift.

Along with the Swift Coding Club, Apple today is announcing the launch of an upcoming AP Computer Science Principles course syllabus and curriculum to let high school students earn Advanced Placement college credit when learning App Development with Swift.

App Development with Swift certification is also available to students, with certification exams offered via Certiport Authorized Testing Centers worldwide.

Apple has been working on coding programs since 2016, when it first launched its Everyone Can Code initiative. Everyone Can Code is a program and curriculum designed to help students of all ages to learn to code.

According to Apple, more than 5,000 schools, community colleges, and technical colleges around the world are using its Everyone Can Code curriculum.

Related Roundup: Apple Stores

Discuss this article in our forums

Chicago Students Present App Projects at ‘Everyone Can Code’ Apple Store Session

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel joined Tim Cook in celebrating Apple's "Everyone Can Code" initiative on Wednesday at the company's Michigan Avenue store, where a special Today at Apple session got underway.


In a special session titled "One Summer Chicago Student App Showcase", young coders presented their latest app creations to onlookers with the help of the store's giant TV display.

Rahm and Cook both took to Twitter to promote the student-centered gig, sharing their photos of participants and members of the public in attendance.



Since December, Apple has been working to bring coding opportunities to almost half a million students in the city of Chicago through an expansion of the company's Everyone Can Code program.

The Swift-oriented initiative has been designed in collaboration with the Mayor's Office of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, City Colleges of Chicago, local businesses and non-profit organizations.

The coding initiative has since been expanded to colleges and universities outside of the United States, taking in institutions from Australia, Denmark, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.


Discuss this article in our forums

Apple and Northwestern University Partner to Train Chicago Teachers on ‘Everyone Can Code’ Curriculum

Apple today announced it will establish a Center for Excellence at Lane Tech College Prep in Chicago, which will serve as a hub for teachers at Chicago Public Schools to learn and subsequently teach Apple's Everyone Can Code curriculum.


Apple is developing the hub in partnership with Northwestern University, whose professors will lead the sessions. Teachers will gain expertise in Everyone Can Code, a free program designed to help students learn how to code, and they'll also have the opportunity to be trained on App Development with Swift.

In addition to the free professional learning sessions, Apple says educators will also have access to in-school coaching and mentorship opportunities to ensure they are comfortable teaching the complete Everyone Can Code curriculum. Apple will outfit the Center for Excellence with iPads, Macs, and accessories.

Apple CEO Tim Cook:
Teachers make a world of difference in their students' lives, and we owe so much of our own success to their creativity, hard work and dedication. At Apple, we believe every student should have the opportunity to learn to code and we are thrilled to help provide new learning opportunities for Chicago-area teachers so they can bring coding into their classrooms.
David Figlio, Dean of Northwestern's School of Education and Social Policy:
We strive to bring Northwestern's research, teaching, and service missions together in our local communities to make lives better in our hometowns of Chicago, Evanston and beyond. By collaborating with visionary companies like Apple and the education experts in the Chicago Public Schools, we have the chance to do something transformative for Chicago and the world.
This effort is an extension of an existing collaboration between Apple and Chicago to bring coding opportunities to the city's nearly 500,000 students through a citywide expansion of Everyone Can Code.

Apple hosted an education-themed event at Lane Tech College Prep on Tuesday, where it introduced a new 9.7-inch iPad with Apple Pencil support, a new Schoolwork app for teachers and students, and more.


Discuss this article in our forums