Waffle, Flamingo, Otter, Sloth, Skunk, and Garlic Among New Emojis Coming to iOS in 2019

More than 200 new emojis will be coming to iOS later this year, with the Unicode Consortium officially approving the final 2019 emoji list.

Emojipedia has a full list of all the emoji we can expect to see in 2019, including flamingo, otter, waffle, sloth, white heart, people holding hands, ice cube, snorkel, orangutan, juice box, falafel, and more.


The 2019 emoji lineup will introduce new emojis to represent people with disabilities, such as person in wheelchair, guide dog, service dog, and deaf person. It will also include support for mixed race couples.

There are 59 new emoji characters, 75 with gender variations, and 230 total emojis when both gender variations and different skin tones are counted.

Now that the Unicode Consortium has finalized the list of 2019 emojis, smartphone makers, social media networks, and others are free to implement the new characters, but must design the new icons first.

The emoji in the Emojipedia images are just representations of the new emoji characters and do not reflect the design that Apple and other smartphone makers will use.


It typically takes Apple several months to introduce support for new emoji characters. In 2018, for example, Apple did not add the new 2018 emojis until the October iOS 12.1 update. Apple is likely to do something similar for iOS 13, so we could see the new emoji come as part of an iOS 13 update after the new operating system is released.

Related Roundup: iOS 13
Tag: emoji

This article, "Waffle, Flamingo, Otter, Sloth, Skunk, and Garlic Among New Emojis Coming to iOS in 2019" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Today is the 10th Anniversary of Emoji on iPhone

On November 21, 2008, Apple released iPhone OS 2.2 to users in Japan, introducing an emoji keyboard and emoji characters for the first time ever on an iPhone. At the time, the latest iPhone to be released was the iPhone 3G, which launched in June 2008 with iPhone OS 2.

The emoji keyboard in 2008 (left) vs 2018 (right), via Jeremy Burge/Emojipedia

Emojipedia has provided an in-depth look today at the first iPhone emojis, explaining that despite Apple's decision to restrict the emoji keyboard to Japan in iPhone OS 2.2, some apps unlocked the keyboard for users outside of Japan. This was the first time that third-party apps were even available on iPhone, since iPhone OS 2.2 also introduced the App Store.

The launch within iPhone OS 2.2 predated emoji support in the Unicode Standard, which now makes the characters universally interchangeable between devices and operating systems.
Apple's 2008 emoji implementation was based on the set used by Japanese carrier Softbank, and the influence on many of these designs is clear.

Even moreso—much the the chagrin of some—Apple's emoji font has gone on to dominate public expectation of what an emoji should look like.

While Apple does not dictate which emojis are approved by Unicode, it is reasonable to wonder that without Apple's strong color emoji support in these earlier years, whether we would see it as the cultural phenomenon it has become today.
Emojis then gained traction in iOS 4 and Mac OS X Lion, but these were still not widely supported across regions. Not until iOS 5 in 2011 did Apple introduce the emoji keyboard setting that allowed anyone around the world to access the characters by tapping the Globe icon on the iOS keyboard. In 2012, Apple introduced 376 new emojis with iOS 6 and switched to Unicode-compatible code points for the emojis.

iPhone OS 2.2 emojis from 2008

One of the latest updates on the emoji timeline came in 2015, when Apple introduced new emojis for the first time in three years with iOS 8.3. This was the year that Apple also enabled the emoji keyboard to all iOS users by default, whereas before each user had to go into the Settings app, find the keyboard settings, and manually add the emoji keyboard.

In total, the number of emojis has increased from 471 in 2008 to 2,776 in 2018, thanks to the introduction of swappable genders and skin tones. Head over to Emojipedia for more details about the emoji anniversary, and to check out a long list of changes that some of the emojis have had over the years.

Tag: emoji

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New 2019 Emoji Candidates Include Service Dog, Deaf Person and More Couples

The Unicode Consortium is working on the list of emojis that will be added to Unicode 12 in 2019, and today Emojipedia shared some details on new emoji candidates that have been suggested for inclusion.

New candidates for Unicode 12 include service dog, deaf people, and mixed race couples.


Because the list of emojis has not yet been finalized, these new emoji candidates won't be included for sure, but they could make their way onto various platforms that support emoji if the Unicode Consortium ultimately approves them.

These new emoji candidate suggestions join other emoji suggested for 2019, including diving mask, waffle, Hindu temple, white heart, ice cube, sloth, flamingo, skunk, ballet shoes, falafel, onion, garlic, otter, and more.


A full list of Unicode 12 emoji candidates is available from Emojipedia.

Apple will likely add the Unicode 12 emoji to iOS, macOS, and Apple Watch devices sometime in the fall of 2019.

At the current time, we're waiting on the addition of Unicode 11 emojis, which Apple said it will add to iOS later this year.


Apple previewed many of the new emoji that it plans to add, including red hair, gray hair, curly hair, cold face, party face, face with hearts, superheroes, kangaroo, peacock, parrot, lobster, mango, lettuce, cupcake, and more.


A few proposals have been made for emojis coming in 2020 and were announced by the Unicode Consortium today, including ninja, military helmet, mammoth, feather, dodo, magic wand, carpentry saw, and screwdriver.


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Apple Highlights Upcoming 2018 Emoji in Celebration of World Emoji Day

World Emoji Day kicks off on July 17, and in celebration of the event, Apple today shared details on new emoji that are coming to iOS devices "later this year" as part of the Unicode 11 emoji release.


Apple plans to introduce 70 new emoji characters later this year, with new options for red hair, gray hair, curly hair, and no hair, along with smiley faces that include cold face, party face, pleading face, and face with hearts.


Super heroes, an eye-shaped nazar amulet, and an infinity symbol will be added, along with new animals such as kangaroo, peacock, parrot, and lobster. New food items include mango, lettuce, cupcake, and moon cake.


A full list of the emoji included in Unicode 11 are listed on the Emojipedia site, and Emojipedia was also able to interview Alan Dye, Apple's VP of User Interface Design to get some insight into how Apple designs new emoji.

According to Dye, when designing new emoji characters, Apple aims for a design that's "the most iconic" and "the most timeless representation" of the item in question. There's no specific formula, though, behind the look of each individual emoji.

"Without a doubt, we want it to always feel like an Apple emoji and that's what we're going for, but we really make that decision on a case by case basis," Dye said.

Apple often discusses adding more diverse options, such as emojis for black families, but it's a challenge to come up with an appropriate interface. "I think that you need a UI that can accommodate the variations," Dye told Emojipedia.

All of the new emoji Apple shared today will be available across iOS, macOS, and watchOS, joining the hundreds of emoji options that are already available. Apple has not said when the new emoji will be released, but they could come out either alongside the release of iOS 12 this September or in an iOS 12 update later this year.

Related Roundup: iOS 12
Tag: emoji

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Apple’s New Memoji vs. Samsung’s AR Emoji

After Apple unveiled Animoji when the iPhone X debuted last September, Samsung introduced its own version, the more human-like and customizable AR Emoji.

Not to be outdone, Apple in iOS 12 introduced Memoji, a new version of Animoji that can be customized to look just like you. Given the similarities between AR Emoji and Memoji, we thought we'd compare the two and give our readers an idea of what to expect when iOS 12 launches this fall.

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Memoji, available in the Messages app and FaceTime on iOS 12, are cartoon-like customizable emoji characters that animate just like Animoji using the TrueDepth camera system in the iPhone X.

Because Animoji and Memoji require Apple's 3D camera capabilities to mimic facial expressions, the feature is limited to the iPhone X. Future devices, including 2018 iPad Pro models and iPhones are rumored to be adopting Face ID though. Samsung's AR Emoji are also limited and available only on Galaxy S9 devices.

Apple's Memoji feature offers up a blank face with a range of customizable options like skin color, hair color, hair style, head shape, eye shape and color, eye brows, nose and lips, ears, and facial hair and freckles.

All of these feature options can be combined to create a range of Memoji with different looks, and you can save dozens of Memoji creations.

While Apple starts you off with a blank face that can be customized to your liking, Samsung's AR Emoji feature has an option to scan your face and automatically create an emoji likeness of you that can then be customized further.

Samsung's AR Emoji look less cute and cartoonish and more like Bitmoji than Apple's version, with more humanoid facial features. AR Emoji can look a little creepier given their closer approximation to human facial features, but some may prefer the look.

Because Samsung doesn't use a 3D facial tracking system for AR Emoji like Memoji and Animoji, AR Emoji's ability to recognize and mimic facial expressions is not as advanced as Apple's technology.

AR Emoji can't compete when it comes to complex facial expressions, especially with the addition of wink and tongue tracking in iOS 12.

Do you prefer the look of Apple's Memoji or Samsung's AR Emoji? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundup: iOS 12

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2019 Emoji Candidates Include Flamingo, White Heart, Diving Mask, Axe, and More

Ahead of the impending arrival of Unicode 11 on June 5, Emojipedia today published an article about all of the emoji characters that will be launching on Apple devices later this year. While these characters were known, the site also looked forward a bit and briefly detailed what users can expect from Unicode 12 coming in March 2019.

On the short list for impending release in 2019 are the Flamingo and White Heart, which are the two "most requested" emojis by Emojipedia readers this year. Otherwise, the following emoji candidates have been drafted for potential launch next year: Diving Mask, Axe, Waffle, Diya Lamp, and Hindu Temple. All of these candidates have also received mockups, seen below, except Waffle.

2019 Emoji concepts via Emojipedia

At this time, these emojis are still only candidates for inclusion in Unicode 12, "and no decisions have been made about the final emoji list for 2019." Emojipedia has been expanding the Unicode 12 candidates list over the past few weeks, now including characters like Yawning Face, Ballet Shoes, Sloth, Butter, Stethoscope, Ringed Planet, and more.

For Unicode 11 in 2018, users can expect social media companies to adopt the new emojis sometime over the summer, while Apple and other smartphone makers will likely add all of the new characters into OS updates in the fall. As a reminder, some of the new emojis include Parrot, Llama, Lobster, Softball, Kangaroo, Partying Face, and more. Check out a glimpse below:

Emojis coming in 2018

If going by traditional releases, Apple should add in these new characters to iOS, macOS, and watchOS devices around September 2018. The company might also provide further details about the incoming 2018 emojis in a press release later this summer, as it did on World Emoji Day last year, in addition to giving the iTunes Movies store an emoji-themed makeover.


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Apple Submits New Accessibility Emojis to Unicode Consortium

Apple today submitted a new proposal [PDF] to the Unicode Consortium, suggesting the committee introduce a series of accessibility emojis in future Unicode releases.

As outlined by Emojipedia, Apple has suggested emojis that include a guide dog, a hearing aid, a prosthetic arm and leg, sign language, a person in a wheelchair, and a person with a cane. Apple's full list of proposed emojis can be seen in its proposal document.

Image via Emojipedia

In its proposal, Apple says it is aiming to better represent individuals with disabilities to provide a more inclusive experience for all. Apple also says this is not an exhaustive list of "all possible depictions of disabilities," but is rather designed to be "an initial starting point."
At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs. Adding emoji emblematic to users' life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability. Emoji are a universal language and a powerful tool for communication, as well as a form of self-expression, and can be used not only to represent one's own personal experience, but also to show support for a loved one.

This new set of emoji that we are proposing aims to provide a wider array of options to represent basic categories for people with disabilities. This is not meant to be a comprehensive list of all possible depictions of disabilities, but to provide an initial starting point for greater representation for diversity within the emoji universe.
To create the emoji suggestions, Apple teamed up with the American Council of the Blind, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, and the National Association of the Deaf. Its initial proposal focused on people in four categories: Blind and Low Vision, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Physical Motor, and Hidden Disabilities.

Apple says its proposal is a "significant step forward in representing more diverse individuals," and that the company hopes it will "spark a global dialogue around better representation for people with disabilities."

Apple is well-known for its dedicated work on making its products accessible to all users, with a suite of Accessibility features built into all of its iPhones, iPads, Macs, and more. Apple maintains a dedicated Accessibility section on its website where it shares details on available Accessibility features and stories of people who have improved their lives with Apple products.

The Unicode Consortium has already finalized the Emoji 11.0 characters that will be adopted by smartphone companies later this year, but Apple's proposed characters could be added to Emoji 12.0, set to be released in 2019.


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Here Are 150+ New Emoji Coming to iPhones and iPads Later This Year

The Unicode Consortium today announced it has finalized a new set of 157 emoji that companies like Apple will be able to implement later this year. There are actually only 77 new emoji in total, as some have multiple skin tones.


Jeremy Burge, who runs the popular emoji-themed website Emojipedia, has shared sample images of every new emoji in an Apple-like style to show how they might look on devices like the iPhone, iPad, and Mac.


Emoji 11.0 will include several new hairstyles and types, including male and female faces with red hair, curly hair, gray hair at a younger age, and no hair or baldness, along with hot and cold faces, and woozy and pleading faces.


Other notable inclusions are new male and female superhero and supervillain options, a face with a party hat, and emojis for well-known activities such as sewing, knitting, lacrosse, softball, frisbee, chess, and skateboarding.


New animals and insects include a kangaroo, parrot, peacock, swan, badger, llama, lobster, hippopotamus, raccoon, and mosquito.

New food options include a bagel, lettuce, mango, and cupcake, among others, while new objects range from a fire extinguisher and test tube to a toilet paper roll and sponge. There's even a pirate flag and an infinity symbol.


Emoji 11.0 will be part of the Unicode 11.0 standard, scheduled for release this June. The new emoji typically start showing up on mobile devices in August or September, so expect to see them on iPhones and iPads around iOS 12. The new emojis should extend to the Mac and Apple Watch at some point too.

Next up will be Emoji 12.0, part of the Unicode 12.0 standard, scheduled for release around March 2019. New guidelines in Emoji 12.0 will allow for emojis that currently face to the left or right only to face either direction.


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Developers Report Recent Enforcement of Stricter Rules for Emoji Use in iOS Apps

Over the past few weeks, iOS app developers have been sharing stories on Twitter about their apps getting rejected by Apple's App Review team because emojis were used in "non-keyboard based situations." So if an app displayed an emoji in its user interface, where the user did not type it in with a keyboard, Apple said it was not complying with its trademark and Apple Emoji imagery guidelines.

As accounts of similar situations begin to build, Emojipedia this week reported on the topic, and attempted to make sense of the new rules, with a handful of examples of apps that have been using emoji within their UI and are now being rejected by Apple. In the iOS app "Reaction Match," a Game Center error screen saw the use of the loudly crying face and alien emojis become problems for developer Eddie Lee. He eventually removed all instances of the emojis, and the App Store reviewers then accepted the app.

Image of Reaction Match's rejected (left) and approved (right) app screens via Emojipedia

Github client app GitHawk faced similar issues, with Apple rejecting the app for its use of emojis as "media" in various parts of the app. As developer and software engineer Ryan Nystrom explained, these instances of "non text input" emoji use got flagged, but once he removed the emojis and used them only as "content" and as text input examples, the app was approved.



Like other newly discovered App Store guidelines, there is some inconsistency in Apple's processes and the exact rules remain unclear. For example, a few major apps apparently violate the new emoji-as-text-only rule -- like Snapchat's emoji friend scores -- but appear to not have had issues in recent updates. Other areas of uncertainty include emojis in push notifications and in responses from chatbot apps.

As Emojipedia pointed out, this could affect smaller developers the most and cause their user interfaces to become less personalized.
Smaller developers will be hardest hit as Apple's professionally designed emojis were a quick and easy way to provide imagery in an app that fit in with the system. They will now need to create their own icons to fill the gap, embed a licensed emoji set, or have a naked-looking UI.

Larger developers have the budget to create their own emoji or icon sets, or to license existing ones. The largest or most popular apps may see Apple overlooking breaches of this new policy.
Apple is known to consistently introduce tweaks and updates to its App Store Review Guidelines, occasionally amending harsher rules that create unexpected problems for some apps. For example, last June Apple introduced new guidelines that banned apps created from a commercialized template or app generation service in an effort to fight clones and spam on the App Store. Eventually, the rule negatively affected small businesses who rely on such templates, and Apple amended its guidelines to be less restrictive.

Outside of the traditional emoji characters, Apple launched a new set of advanced emojis with Animoji on the iPhone X. The new feature creates 3D models of existing emojis and tracks their animations to the user's facial features using the iPhone X's TrueDepth front-facing camera, which resulted in the phenomenon of "Animoji Karaoke" videos that Apple itself eventually got in on.

Related Roundup: iOS 11

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Former Apple Intern Looks Back at Designing First Apple Emoji in 2008

Back in 2008, Angela Guzman was a graphic design student at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and an intern at Apple, where she joined the iPhone team and worked alongside another Apple designer, Raymond, to come up with the first 500 emoji characters that were available on the iPhone.

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of her internship, Guzman has taken a look back at her time at Apple and her work on emoji in an interesting retrospective shared on Medium.

Image via Angela Guzman

When Guzman was handed the emoji project at Apple, it came at a time when emoji were unfamiliar in the English speaking world. Guzman received a crash course in Apple design and then started designing emoji, which featured incredible detail even right from the start. Then Apple CEO Steve Jobs reviewed each batch of emoji before it was approved for launch.
Regardless of how fast I could crank one out, I constantly checked the details: the direction of the woodgrain, how freckles appeared on apples and eggplants, how leaf veins ran on a hibiscus, how leather was stitched on a football, the details were neverending. I tried really hard to capture all this in every pixel, zooming in and zooming out, because every detail mattered.
Some emoji, says Guzman, have interesting back stories. The happy poop swirl, for example, was reused as the top of the ice cream cone. Harder, more detailed emoji were left last, such as the now-iconic dancer with the red dress.

Guzman's emoji were first launched in Japan in November of 2008, and in the time since then, emoji have changed the way we communicate. Emoji have become an important part of the iOS and macOS ecosystem, and Apple has continued refining and improving its emoji offerings with each Unicode update.

As with the first Apple emoji designed by Guzman and her partner Raymond, emoji today feature incredible detail thanks to the talented artists at Apple who take the time to make sure each and every pixel is perfect.

iOS 11.1 was the last iOS update that introduced new emoji, bringing Unicode 10 characters like crazy face, pie, pretzel, t-rex, vampire, exploding head, face vomiting, shushing face, love you gesture, brain, scarf, zebra, giraffe, fortune cookie, pie, hedgehog, and more.


The next emoji update will come with the release of Unicode 11 in 2018, and emoji proposals for that update include smiling face with three hearts, blue face with icicles, smiling face with cape, mango, cupcake, kangaroo, llama, peacock, and red hair options for existing emoji.

Tag: emoji

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