Unicode Consortium Makes Submitting Emoji Proposals Simpler With Redesigned Website

In celebration of World Emoji Day today, the Unicode Consortium has announced the launch of a redesigned website aimed at making it easier for anyone to submit a proposal for a new emoji.

For those unfamiliar with the Unicode Consortium, it is the nonprofit organization that maintains text standards to support the world's written languages across all devices, which includes emoji characters.


The updated website makes information about the emoji proposal process more accessible to people along with encouraging public participation in Unicode initiatives.

Since 2010, the Unicode Standard has covered emoji characters, which has helped standardize the available emojis across all platforms. Emoji encoding and standardization are just one part of the Consortium's text standards work, but the popularity of emoji has garnered a lot of attention for the organization.
"We've been working with the Unicode Consortium for several years to open up the emoji proposals process by making it more accessible and understandable," said Jennifer 8. Lee, co-founder of Emojination. "While I personally found the late-90s aesthetic of the developer-centric Unicode.org site very retro and nerd charming, the new site redesign is a reflection of Unicode's deep desire to engage the public in its work."
The new site has a more modern design and it offers information on the emoji submission and standardization process.
"Emoji are just one element of our broader mission," said Mark Davis, president and co-founder of the Unicode Consortium. "The Consortium is a team of largely volunteers who are dedicated to ensuring that people all over the world can use their language of choice in digital communication across any computer, phone or other device. From English and Chinese to Cherokee, Hindi and Rohingya, the Consortium is committed to preserving every language for the digital era."
The Unicode Consortium's new website is available starting today, and to earn money for future endeavors, the site is allowing people to "adopt" an emoji character, including new Unicode 12 characters like the the sloth, sea otter, waffle, and Saturn.


This article, "Unicode Consortium Makes Submitting Emoji Proposals Simpler With Redesigned Website" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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😂 😘 and ❤️ Named Most Popular Emoji in New Adobe Study

Today is World Emoji Day, and in celebration of emojis, Adobe released its 2019 Emoji Trend Report, giving us some insight into the most popular emoji characters that people are using. For its report, Adobe surveyed 1,000 emoji users in the United States.

The most popular emoji was the laughing face with tears of joy (😂), while the heart (❤️) came in second and the face blowing a kiss (😘) was the third most popular emoji. Top pairings included heart eyes/face blowing a kiss (😍😘), laughing face with tears of joy/rolling on the floor laughing face (😂🤣), and face blowing a kiss/red heart (😘❤️).


Among emoji users, 62 percent said they use emoji to make conversations more fun, while 42 percent said they use them to better communicate thoughts and feelings. 31 percent said they use emoji to feel more connected to people, 31 percent said using emojis is faster than typing words, and 30 percent said they use emojis because they paint a clearer picture than words.

Women were most likely to use the 😂, ❤️, and 😘 emojis, respectively, while men favored 😂, 😁, and 😢. 93 percent of all emoji users said emojis lighten the mood of a conversation, while 91 percent said they use emojis to show support to people.

Specific emojis are used to represent different moods, as outlined in Adobe's graphic below:


81 percent of emoji users believe that people who use emojis are friendlier and more approachable, and when asked about the benefits of emoji 94 percent cited the ability to communicate across language barriers while 94 percent cited the usefulness of emojis to instantly share thoughts and ideas.


65 percent of emoji users said they were more comfortable expressing emotions via emoji rather than a phone call, something more prevalent among younger Generation Z individuals. Emoji users are most likely to include emojis in text messages, and among social networks, emoji usage is highest on Facebook.


When it comes to emoji at work, 61 percent said that they use emojis in a work context. 78 percent said emojis positively impact likability, 63 percent said emojis impact credibility, and 74 percent said emojis make positive news more sincere.


58 percent of emoji users said they're more likely to open up an email from a brand that uses emoji in the subject line, and 44 percent said that they're more likely to purchase products advertised using emojis.

76 percent of emoji users wish there were more emoji, specifically emojis representing food, drinks, and snacks. Emoji users also want more emojis related to animals and insects, emotions, and hand gestures, plus more representation/diversity.

Adobe's full emoji report, which includes additional details on how, when, and why people use emojis, can be accessed through Adobe's emoji blog.

Emojis have become an increasingly important part of the smartphone ecosystem in recent years, and Apple has embraced emoji, regularly adding new emoji characters following Unicode Consortium updates. Apple is set to add new emoji at some point in iOS 13 as earlier this year, the Unicode Consortium finalized its list of 2019 emojis.

Image via Emojipedia

Emojis we can expect to see in 2019 include flamingo, otter, waffle, butter, sloth, white heart, people holding hands, ice cube, snorkel, ballet shoe, orangutan, juice box, falafel, juice box, skunk, and more.

Note: Because emoji do not display properly on the MacRumors forums at the current time, please view this post on the MacRumors site to see the full emoji characters mentioned.

Tags: emoji, Adobe

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Waffle, Flamingo, Otter, Sloth, Skunk, and Garlic Among New Emojis Coming to iOS in 2019

More than 200 new emojis will be coming to iOS later this year, with the Unicode Consortium officially approving the final 2019 emoji list.

Emojipedia has a full list of all the emoji we can expect to see in 2019, including flamingo, otter, waffle, sloth, white heart, people holding hands, ice cube, snorkel, orangutan, juice box, falafel, and more.


The 2019 emoji lineup will introduce new emojis to represent people with disabilities, such as person in wheelchair, guide dog, service dog, and deaf person. It will also include support for mixed race couples.

There are 59 new emoji characters, 75 with gender variations, and 230 total emojis when both gender variations and different skin tones are counted.

Now that the Unicode Consortium has finalized the list of 2019 emojis, smartphone makers, social media networks, and others are free to implement the new characters, but must design the new icons first.

The emoji in the Emojipedia images are just representations of the new emoji characters and do not reflect the design that Apple and other smartphone makers will use.


It typically takes Apple several months to introduce support for new emoji characters. In 2018, for example, Apple did not add the new 2018 emojis until the October iOS 12.1 update. Apple is likely to do something similar for iOS 13, so we could see the new emoji come as part of an iOS 13 update after the new operating system is released.

Related Roundup: iOS 13
Tag: emoji

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Today is the 10th Anniversary of Emoji on iPhone

On November 21, 2008, Apple released iPhone OS 2.2 to users in Japan, introducing an emoji keyboard and emoji characters for the first time ever on an iPhone. At the time, the latest iPhone to be released was the iPhone 3G, which launched in June 2008 with iPhone OS 2.

The emoji keyboard in 2008 (left) vs 2018 (right), via Jeremy Burge/Emojipedia

Emojipedia has provided an in-depth look today at the first iPhone emojis, explaining that despite Apple's decision to restrict the emoji keyboard to Japan in iPhone OS 2.2, some apps unlocked the keyboard for users outside of Japan. This was the first time that third-party apps were even available on iPhone, since iPhone OS 2.2 also introduced the App Store.

The launch within iPhone OS 2.2 predated emoji support in the Unicode Standard, which now makes the characters universally interchangeable between devices and operating systems.
Apple's 2008 emoji implementation was based on the set used by Japanese carrier Softbank, and the influence on many of these designs is clear.

Even moreso—much the the chagrin of some—Apple's emoji font has gone on to dominate public expectation of what an emoji should look like.

While Apple does not dictate which emojis are approved by Unicode, it is reasonable to wonder that without Apple's strong color emoji support in these earlier years, whether we would see it as the cultural phenomenon it has become today.
Emojis then gained traction in iOS 4 and Mac OS X Lion, but these were still not widely supported across regions. Not until iOS 5 in 2011 did Apple introduce the emoji keyboard setting that allowed anyone around the world to access the characters by tapping the Globe icon on the iOS keyboard. In 2012, Apple introduced 376 new emojis with iOS 6 and switched to Unicode-compatible code points for the emojis.

iPhone OS 2.2 emojis from 2008

One of the latest updates on the emoji timeline came in 2015, when Apple introduced new emojis for the first time in three years with iOS 8.3. This was the year that Apple also enabled the emoji keyboard to all iOS users by default, whereas before each user had to go into the Settings app, find the keyboard settings, and manually add the emoji keyboard.

In total, the number of emojis has increased from 471 in 2008 to 2,776 in 2018, thanks to the introduction of swappable genders and skin tones. Head over to Emojipedia for more details about the emoji anniversary, and to check out a long list of changes that some of the emojis have had over the years.

Tag: emoji

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New 2019 Emoji Candidates Include Service Dog, Deaf Person and More Couples

The Unicode Consortium is working on the list of emojis that will be added to Unicode 12 in 2019, and today Emojipedia shared some details on new emoji candidates that have been suggested for inclusion.

New candidates for Unicode 12 include service dog, deaf people, and mixed race couples.


Because the list of emojis has not yet been finalized, these new emoji candidates won't be included for sure, but they could make their way onto various platforms that support emoji if the Unicode Consortium ultimately approves them.

These new emoji candidate suggestions join other emoji suggested for 2019, including diving mask, waffle, Hindu temple, white heart, ice cube, sloth, flamingo, skunk, ballet shoes, falafel, onion, garlic, otter, and more.


A full list of Unicode 12 emoji candidates is available from Emojipedia.

Apple will likely add the Unicode 12 emoji to iOS, macOS, and Apple Watch devices sometime in the fall of 2019.

At the current time, we're waiting on the addition of Unicode 11 emojis, which Apple said it will add to iOS later this year.


Apple previewed many of the new emoji that it plans to add, including red hair, gray hair, curly hair, cold face, party face, face with hearts, superheroes, kangaroo, peacock, parrot, lobster, mango, lettuce, cupcake, and more.


A few proposals have been made for emojis coming in 2020 and were announced by the Unicode Consortium today, including ninja, military helmet, mammoth, feather, dodo, magic wand, carpentry saw, and screwdriver.


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Apple Highlights Upcoming 2018 Emoji in Celebration of World Emoji Day

World Emoji Day kicks off on July 17, and in celebration of the event, Apple today shared details on new emoji that are coming to iOS devices "later this year" as part of the Unicode 11 emoji release.


Apple plans to introduce 70 new emoji characters later this year, with new options for red hair, gray hair, curly hair, and no hair, along with smiley faces that include cold face, party face, pleading face, and face with hearts.


Super heroes, an eye-shaped nazar amulet, and an infinity symbol will be added, along with new animals such as kangaroo, peacock, parrot, and lobster. New food items include mango, lettuce, cupcake, and moon cake.


A full list of the emoji included in Unicode 11 are listed on the Emojipedia site, and Emojipedia was also able to interview Alan Dye, Apple's VP of User Interface Design to get some insight into how Apple designs new emoji.

According to Dye, when designing new emoji characters, Apple aims for a design that's "the most iconic" and "the most timeless representation" of the item in question. There's no specific formula, though, behind the look of each individual emoji.

"Without a doubt, we want it to always feel like an Apple emoji and that's what we're going for, but we really make that decision on a case by case basis," Dye said.

Apple often discusses adding more diverse options, such as emojis for black families, but it's a challenge to come up with an appropriate interface. "I think that you need a UI that can accommodate the variations," Dye told Emojipedia.

All of the new emoji Apple shared today will be available across iOS, macOS, and watchOS, joining the hundreds of emoji options that are already available. Apple has not said when the new emoji will be released, but they could come out either alongside the release of iOS 12 this September or in an iOS 12 update later this year.

Related Roundup: iOS 12
Tag: emoji

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Apple’s New Memoji vs. Samsung’s AR Emoji

After Apple unveiled Animoji when the iPhone X debuted last September, Samsung introduced its own version, the more human-like and customizable AR Emoji.

Not to be outdone, Apple in iOS 12 introduced Memoji, a new version of Animoji that can be customized to look just like you. Given the similarities between AR Emoji and Memoji, we thought we'd compare the two and give our readers an idea of what to expect when iOS 12 launches this fall.

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Memoji, available in the Messages app and FaceTime on iOS 12, are cartoon-like customizable emoji characters that animate just like Animoji using the TrueDepth camera system in the iPhone X.

Because Animoji and Memoji require Apple's 3D camera capabilities to mimic facial expressions, the feature is limited to the iPhone X. Future devices, including 2018 iPad Pro models and iPhones are rumored to be adopting Face ID though. Samsung's AR Emoji are also limited and available only on Galaxy S9 devices.

Apple's Memoji feature offers up a blank face with a range of customizable options like skin color, hair color, hair style, head shape, eye shape and color, eye brows, nose and lips, ears, and facial hair and freckles.

All of these feature options can be combined to create a range of Memoji with different looks, and you can save dozens of Memoji creations.

While Apple starts you off with a blank face that can be customized to your liking, Samsung's AR Emoji feature has an option to scan your face and automatically create an emoji likeness of you that can then be customized further.

Samsung's AR Emoji look less cute and cartoonish and more like Bitmoji than Apple's version, with more humanoid facial features. AR Emoji can look a little creepier given their closer approximation to human facial features, but some may prefer the look.

Because Samsung doesn't use a 3D facial tracking system for AR Emoji like Memoji and Animoji, AR Emoji's ability to recognize and mimic facial expressions is not as advanced as Apple's technology.

AR Emoji can't compete when it comes to complex facial expressions, especially with the addition of wink and tongue tracking in iOS 12.

Do you prefer the look of Apple's Memoji or Samsung's AR Emoji? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundup: iOS 12

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2019 Emoji Candidates Include Flamingo, White Heart, Diving Mask, Axe, and More

Ahead of the impending arrival of Unicode 11 on June 5, Emojipedia today published an article about all of the emoji characters that will be launching on Apple devices later this year. While these characters were known, the site also looked forward a bit and briefly detailed what users can expect from Unicode 12 coming in March 2019.

On the short list for impending release in 2019 are the Flamingo and White Heart, which are the two "most requested" emojis by Emojipedia readers this year. Otherwise, the following emoji candidates have been drafted for potential launch next year: Diving Mask, Axe, Waffle, Diya Lamp, and Hindu Temple. All of these candidates have also received mockups, seen below, except Waffle.

2019 Emoji concepts via Emojipedia

At this time, these emojis are still only candidates for inclusion in Unicode 12, "and no decisions have been made about the final emoji list for 2019." Emojipedia has been expanding the Unicode 12 candidates list over the past few weeks, now including characters like Yawning Face, Ballet Shoes, Sloth, Butter, Stethoscope, Ringed Planet, and more.

For Unicode 11 in 2018, users can expect social media companies to adopt the new emojis sometime over the summer, while Apple and other smartphone makers will likely add all of the new characters into OS updates in the fall. As a reminder, some of the new emojis include Parrot, Llama, Lobster, Softball, Kangaroo, Partying Face, and more. Check out a glimpse below:

Emojis coming in 2018

If going by traditional releases, Apple should add in these new characters to iOS, macOS, and watchOS devices around September 2018. The company might also provide further details about the incoming 2018 emojis in a press release later this summer, as it did on World Emoji Day last year, in addition to giving the iTunes Movies store an emoji-themed makeover.


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Apple Submits New Accessibility Emojis to Unicode Consortium

Apple today submitted a new proposal [PDF] to the Unicode Consortium, suggesting the committee introduce a series of accessibility emojis in future Unicode releases.

As outlined by Emojipedia, Apple has suggested emojis that include a guide dog, a hearing aid, a prosthetic arm and leg, sign language, a person in a wheelchair, and a person with a cane. Apple's full list of proposed emojis can be seen in its proposal document.

Image via Emojipedia

In its proposal, Apple says it is aiming to better represent individuals with disabilities to provide a more inclusive experience for all. Apple also says this is not an exhaustive list of "all possible depictions of disabilities," but is rather designed to be "an initial starting point."
At Apple, we believe that technology should be accessible to everyone and should provide an experience that serves individual needs. Adding emoji emblematic to users' life experiences helps foster a diverse culture that is inclusive of disability. Emoji are a universal language and a powerful tool for communication, as well as a form of self-expression, and can be used not only to represent one's own personal experience, but also to show support for a loved one.

This new set of emoji that we are proposing aims to provide a wider array of options to represent basic categories for people with disabilities. This is not meant to be a comprehensive list of all possible depictions of disabilities, but to provide an initial starting point for greater representation for diversity within the emoji universe.
To create the emoji suggestions, Apple teamed up with the American Council of the Blind, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, and the National Association of the Deaf. Its initial proposal focused on people in four categories: Blind and Low Vision, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Physical Motor, and Hidden Disabilities.

Apple says its proposal is a "significant step forward in representing more diverse individuals," and that the company hopes it will "spark a global dialogue around better representation for people with disabilities."

Apple is well-known for its dedicated work on making its products accessible to all users, with a suite of Accessibility features built into all of its iPhones, iPads, Macs, and more. Apple maintains a dedicated Accessibility section on its website where it shares details on available Accessibility features and stories of people who have improved their lives with Apple products.

The Unicode Consortium has already finalized the Emoji 11.0 characters that will be adopted by smartphone companies later this year, but Apple's proposed characters could be added to Emoji 12.0, set to be released in 2019.


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Here Are 150+ New Emoji Coming to iPhones and iPads Later This Year

The Unicode Consortium today announced it has finalized a new set of 157 emoji that companies like Apple will be able to implement later this year. There are actually only 77 new emoji in total, as some have multiple skin tones.


Jeremy Burge, who runs the popular emoji-themed website Emojipedia, has shared sample images of every new emoji in an Apple-like style to show how they might look on devices like the iPhone, iPad, and Mac.


Emoji 11.0 will include several new hairstyles and types, including male and female faces with red hair, curly hair, gray hair at a younger age, and no hair or baldness, along with hot and cold faces, and woozy and pleading faces.


Other notable inclusions are new male and female superhero and supervillain options, a face with a party hat, and emojis for well-known activities such as sewing, knitting, lacrosse, softball, frisbee, chess, and skateboarding.


New animals and insects include a kangaroo, parrot, peacock, swan, badger, llama, lobster, hippopotamus, raccoon, and mosquito.

New food options include a bagel, lettuce, mango, and cupcake, among others, while new objects range from a fire extinguisher and test tube to a toilet paper roll and sponge. There's even a pirate flag and an infinity symbol.


Emoji 11.0 will be part of the Unicode 11.0 standard, scheduled for release this June. The new emoji typically start showing up on mobile devices in August or September, so expect to see them on iPhones and iPads around iOS 12. The new emojis should extend to the Mac and Apple Watch at some point too.

Next up will be Emoji 12.0, part of the Unicode 12.0 standard, scheduled for release around March 2019. New guidelines in Emoji 12.0 will allow for emojis that currently face to the left or right only to face either direction.


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