Elizabeth Warren Outlines Right-To-Repair Legislation That Could Affect Apple’s Products

Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has shared another Medium post today, this one outlining a plan to enact a national right-to-repair law in the event that she is elected. Her stance on right-to-repair laws is just a portion of her Medium post, which mostly focuses on "leveling the playing field" for American farmers.


One of Warren's points centers on the fact that many farmers are forced to rely on authorized agents to repair equipment, leading to higher prices for the farmer. Warren says this is "ridiculous" and that farmers should be able to repair their own equipment, leading to her "strong support" for a national right-to-repair law.

Although Warren's post focuses on agriculture, Motherboard points out that her legislation would impact American customers across the board, from farmers fixing tractors to an iPhone owner looking to fix their smartphone at a lower cost without breaking warranty.
Elizabeth Warren: Farmers should be able to repair their own equipment or choose between multiple repair shops. That’s why I strongly support a national right-to-repair law that empowers farmers to repair their equipment without going to an authorized agent.

The national right-to-repair law should require manufacturers of farm equipment to make diagnostic tools, manuals, and other repair-related resources available to any individual or business, not just their own dealerships and authorized agents. This will not only allow individuals to fix their own equipment — reducing delays — but it will also create competition among dealers and independent repair shops, bringing down prices overall.
Apple encourages users to visit authorized repair shops, or Apple itself, to fix its devices. The company also builds its devices with many proprietary tools that make it difficult for users to repair at home, as many iFixit teardowns have proven. If Warren's legislation passed, this practice by Apple would seemingly be under a microscope in Washington.

This is the second Medium post that Warren has shared that could affect Apple in some way if she becomes President of the United States. Earlier this month, Warren outlined a plan to "break up" big tech companies to prevent monopolistic behavior. For Apple, this means that it would either have to choose between running the App Store or selling its first-party apps on it, but not both simultaneously.

The presidential candidate also wants to unwind big mergers like Amazon and Whole Foods, Facebook and Instagram, and Google and Nest. Warren argued that undoing these mergers would promote healthy competition in the tech market and put pressure back on big tech companies, making them more responsive to user concerns about privacy.

You can read Warren's latest Medium post here.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


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Presidential Candidate Elizabeth Warren’s Plan to ‘Break Up’ Big Tech Companies Could Affect Apple’s App Store

Senator Elizabeth Warren, who is in the running for the 2020 presidential race as a Democratic candidate, today outlined her proposal for "breaking up" tech giants like Amazon, Google, and Facebook in an effort to combat monopolistic behavior (via CNBC). Apple is not directly mentioned in Warren's post on Medium, but a representative from her campaign confirmed the plan would affect Apple.

Image via CNBC and Scott Olson/Getty Images

In essence, Warren wants to make "big, structural changes" to the technology sector in order to promote increased competition. The presidential candidate says that these companies have too much power "over our economy, our society, and our democracy," in the process hurting small businesses and stifling innovation.

To combat this, Warren proposes a path to restoring competition to the tech sector in two major steps. The first is by passing legislation that requires large tech platforms to be designated as "Platform Utilities" and broken apart from any participant on that platform.

This first step is what would directly affect Apple, as the App Store would become a Platform Utility, and any of Apple's first-party apps on it would not be allowed. So, the company would have to choose between running the App Store or building and selling its own apps, according to Warren spokeswoman Saloni Sharma. The same law would hit Amazon on its Marketplace and Google's ad exchange.

Second, the Warren administration would appoint regulators committed to reversing anti-competitive tech mergers. These include "unwinding" mergers like Amazon/Whole Foods/Zappos, Facebook/WhatsApp/Instagram, and Google/Waze/Nest/DoubleClick.

Warren argues that undoing these mergers would promote healthy competition in the market, putting pressure back on big tech companies that would make them more responsive to user concerns, particularly about privacy. "Facebook would face real pressure from Instagram and WhatsApp to improve the user experience and protect our privacy," says Warren.

Toward the end of her blog post, Warren summed up her strategy:
Here’s what won’t change: You’ll still be able to go on Google and search like you do today. You’ll still be able to go on Amazon and find 30 different coffee machines that you can get delivered to your house in two days. You’ll still be able to go on Facebook and see how your old friend from school is doing.

Here’s what will change: Small businesses would have a fair shot to sell their products on Amazon without the fear of Amazon pushing them out of business. Google couldn’t smother competitors by demoting their products on Google Search. Facebook would face real pressure from Instagram and WhatsApp to improve the user experience and protect our privacy. Tech entrepreneurs would have a fighting chance to compete against the tech giants.
Warren is among a dozen Democrats who have announced their runs for the 2020 presidential bid over the past few months, also including senator Kamala Harris, congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, entrepreneur Andrew Yang, governor Jay Inslee, and senator Bernie Sanders. Confirmed Republican candidates running next year include president Donald Trump and former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


This article, "Presidential Candidate Elizabeth Warren's Plan to 'Break Up' Big Tech Companies Could Affect Apple's App Store" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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