Apple Classifies Early 2013 21.5-inch iMac as Obsolete

Apple has added the Early 2013 21.5-inch iMac to its vintage and obsolete products list. The model of iMac is now classified by the company as vintage in the United States and Turkey, and obsolete in the rest of the world.


Apple defines vintage products as those that have not been manufactured for more than five but less than seven years. Macs and other products on the vintage and obsolete list are generally no longer eligible for hardware service at a Genius Bar or Apple Authorized Service Providers.

That being said, also-obsolete Late 2012 model iMacs are currently eligible for Apple's pilot program that allows for repairs to continue into the vintage period, subject to parts availability. It's not clear if the Early 2013 model 21.5-inch iMac will also come under the pilot program, but Apple has expanded it to include additional Macs and other Apple devices in the past.

The Early 2013 21.5-inch iMac was originally only available to educational institutions, taking advantage of a cheaper dual-core Intel Core i3 processor and integrated graphics to offer pricing of $1099, which was $200 less than the entry-level pricing for the consumer 2.15-inch iMac models Apple was selling at the time. The education-only iMac, which carries a model number of ME699LL/A, also included just 4GB of RAM and a 500GB hard drive.


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Nearly 50,000 Students in Glasgow, Scotland to Receive Free iPads to Assist With Education

Nearly 50,000 students in Glasgow, Scotland will receive free iPads to assist with their education, as part of a seven-year £300 million agreement between Glasgow City Council and Canadian IT firm CGI, according to the BBC.


As part of the deal, every student in academic year P6 to S6 will receive their own iPad to keep for school use, while younger students in academic years P1 through P5 will have shared access to an iPad. A total of 47,000 iPads will be handed out to students by 2021, and 4,900 teachers will also receive one.

The initiative will also include the installation of Wi-Fi in every classroom and faster internet connections overall.

The report notes that all of the iPads will be tracked and managed by the Glasgow City Council, which can lock or erase the devices remotely, while social media platforms and inappropriate websites will be blocked. The initiative has already been tested at a number of schools across Glasgow.

"This is the biggest Apple education initiative in Europe and I'm delighted that Glasgow is once again leading the way in innovative practices," said Glasgow councillor Chris Cunningham, according to STV News.


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Apple to Begin Selling Square Panda’s Phonics Learning System for iPad

Square Panda today announced that its phonics learning system for kids will now be sold at select Apple Stores and on Apple.com.


The Bluetooth-enabled, multisensory playset uses iPad apps to help children interact with a variety of fun games, each of which helps them learn to read, write, and communicate. The system also incorporates physical smart letters, which children place in the playset and then watch the letters and words appear on the screen.

We don't see the Apple.com listing yet, but Square Panda is also available for $39.50 on Amazon after applying an instant $10 on-page coupon.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon.


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Apple Working With Non-Profit Dream Corps to Develop New Educational Coding Initiative

Apple today announced that it will partner with the Oakland-based non-profit organization Dream Corps in an effort to bring educational and workforce development opportunities to young adults. The program's goal is to help these individuals find success and career placement in the tech sector.

Vien Truong, CEO of Dream Corps

The program is part of Apple's Community Education Initiative, and stems from Dream Corps' existing #YesWeCode Initiative, which aims "to help 100,000 young women and men from underrepresented backgrounds find success in the tech sector." To date, #YesWeCode has graduated around 100 people and placed 60 percent in new tech jobs.

As part of the new initiative, Apple will work with Vien Truong, CEO of Dream Corps, to bring coding and workforce development programs to local youth in Oakland, California.
“We are thrilled about launching this new initiative in Oakland,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives. “Our hope is that by bringing expertise, stakeholders and resources together, we’ll be able to magnify the already impressive impact that Dream Corps is having in the Bay Area and across the nation and help a new generation of young people realize their potential.”
For its part, Apple will provide technology, professional support, curriculum guidance, and advocacy to those in middle and high school, college, and beyond. Apple's Swift coding language will be a major focus of the program, which is set to launch later this year in the Bay Area, and then expand nationwide at a later date.

To highlight the success of #YesWeCode, Apple today also shared the story of Gerald Ingraham, a U.S. Marine who found the coding program and completed it while working full-time in various administration and construction jobs. He was determined to find a fulfilling career, and looking for more stable work to help pay hospital bills for his son, who was diagnosed with brain cancer.


In 2018, one year after completing the program, Ingraham landed a job as a software developer at a video game company. "I'm finally doing something I chose," said Ingraham, "not something I just fell into because that was the only skill I had. I feel better about myself — and my oldest son told me how I've inspired him."


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Tim Cook and Ivanka Trump Visiting Idaho School District Today

Apple CEO Tim Cook and Ivanka Trump, adviser to President Donald Trump, are visiting Idaho's Wilder School District together today to examine the district's use of technology in education, according to The Idaho Statesman.


The visit is part of Ivanka Trump's ongoing workforce development and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education initiatives. Last year, the Trump administration reached out to Cook and other major technology, business, and education leaders for advice regarding STEM education in public schools.

In 2016, Apple donated an iPad to every student, a Mac and iPad to every teacher, and an Apple TV to every classroom in the Wilder School District through its ConnectED initiative. Since 2014, Apple has pledged $100 million in technology solutions to 114 low-income or underserved schools across the United States.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


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Apple’s Free ‘Everyone Can Create’ Music, Drawing, Photos, and Video Guides Now Available on Apple Books

Apple today announced that its Everyone Can Create curriculum is now available in English on Apple Books for Mac, iPad, and iPhone. Apple says additional languages will be available by the end of 2018.


Everyone Can Create is designed to allow teachers to easily incorporate creativity into their existing lesson plans in any subject, including language arts, math, science, history, social studies, and coding. The series of guides teach students to develop ideas through drawing, music, video, and photos on iPad.

Apple's marketing chief Phil Schiller:
We believe Apple technology can help unleash every child's creative genius. Working closely with teachers, we have built the Everyone Can Create curriculum to help bring creative expression and the arts into the classroom, and to help students stay engaged through creativity and ultimately be more successful.
Apple says that, since releasing a preview of Everyone Can Create in March, more than 350 schools around the world have adopted the curriculum.

Apple Stores are also using Everyone Can Create in their Teacher Tuesday sessions. 504 stores in 24 countries have already taught over 5,000 hands-on Teacher Tuesday sessions on topics including coding and app design, video and music creation, and creative visual presentations, according to Apple.

Everyone Can Create includes four student guides for drawing, music, video, and photos, available for free in Apple Books. A companion teacher guide helps bring these projects to life, with 300 lesson ideas across media, projects, and subjects.


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Apple’s Free Schoolwork App Now Available to Teachers

Apple today announced that its free Schoolwork app, introduced at its education event in Chicago in March, is now available for teachers.


Schoolwork enables teachers to share assignments and announcements with students, track student progress, tailor instructions to student needs, collaborate one-on-one with students, provide instant feedback, and more.
Schoolwork makes it easy to create and send announcements and assignments with almost any type of content, from web links to PDFs and documents, and even specific activities in apps. Students can use Schoolwork to stay organized and keep track of the work they need to complete and when they need to hand it in.
Schoolwork works alongside Apple's existing Classroom app for iPad, and soon Mac. The app allows teachers to monitor every student's iPad in class.


Classroom on iPad, for example, helps teachers keep students focused on a specific app or website and lets them view student screens during class, share documents with students, assign shared iPads, reset a student's password, and more.

More details about the Schoolwork and Classroom apps and deployment are available on Apple's education tools website.


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Apple Expands ‘Everyone Can Code’ Initiative to Students Around the World

Apple today announced that its "Everyone Can Code" initiative is being expanded to more than 20 colleges and universities outside of the United States. RMIT in Australia, Mercantec in Denmark, Hogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen in the Netherlands, Unitec Institute of Technology in New Zealand, and Plymouth University in the UK are some of the schools that will teach Apple coding classes.

All participating schools will offer Apple's App Development with Swift Curriculum, which is a full-year coding course designed by Apple engineers and educators. The course aims to teach students how to code and design apps for the App Store, and it is open to students of all levels and backgrounds.

"We launched the Everyone Can Code initiative less than a year ago with the ambitious goal of offering instruction in coding to as many people as possible. Our program has been incredibly popular among US schools and colleges, and today marks an important step forward as we expand internationally," said Tim Cook, Apple's CEO. "We are proud to work with RMIT and many other schools around the world who share our vision of empowering students with tools that can help them change the world."
According to Apple, RMIT University in Australia will offer one of the broadest implementations of the App Development with Swift Curriculum, making the course available through both a vocational course taught on campus and RMIT Online. RMIT also plans to offer scholarships to school teachers who want to learn to code and a free summer school course at the RMIT City campus.

Apple introduced its App Development with Swift curriculum in early 2017, with the materials available as a free download from the iBooks Store. At the time the initiative was introduced, six community college systems serving 500,000 students across the United States agreed to offer the Apple-designed course. Later in the year, the course expanded to 30 more community college systems in the U.S. before becoming available internationally.

App Development with Swift is offered as part of the Everyone Can Code initiative. Under the program, Apple also offers coding curriculum to students in elementary school, middle school, and high school.


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