Apple Park Decorated With Rainbow Colors in Celebration of Steve Jobs and Formal Opening of Campus

Apple Park is decorated with the colors of Apple's classic rainbow logo today in celebration of the formal opening of Apple's new headquarters, and as a tribute to its late co-founder Steve Jobs, who helped conceptualize the spaceship-like design of the main building on the campus prior to his death.

First and foremost, Apple has set up a stage with a rainbow arch within the inner circle of the main building, as we shared last week.


The rainbow colors can further be seen on some stairs and walkways at Apple Park, on coffee cups at the Caffè Macs employee cafeteria, and on some of Apple's shuttle buses. Apple employees have also received classic Apple rainbow logo pins with the message "thank you for being part of what makes Apple, Apple."





Apple's design chief Jony Ive reflected on the rainbow's significance in a recent interview:
There is the resonance with the rainbow logo that's been part of our identity for many years. The rainbow is also a positive and joyful expression of some of our inclusion values and I think that one of the primary reasons the idea resonated so immediately and so profoundly with us was the form -- the connection from an aesthetic design point of view. A semi-circle relates so beautifully and naturally to the form of the ring.
Rumors suggest that Lady Gaga will be making a special performance at Apple Park later today. The pop star has visited Apple before, having previously dropped by its Infinite Loop campus to visit Steve Jobs. Apple executive Eddy Cue recounted that experience in an interview with Steven Levy last year:
Lady Gaga once came in to visit Steve. I don't know exactly what she was wearing, but it looked like it was made out of, like, a Glad trash bag, and she had these huge heels and these gigantic glasses. I'm thinking, "This is going to be a disaster." But she sat down and started talking with Steve and she had all these great ideas.
Lady Gaga also performed at the iTunes Festival at the Roundhouse in London in 2013.

Apple employees began moving into Apple Park as early as the spring of 2017, but the process took many months, and some construction and landscaping also continued for quite some time. A recent drone video showed that the campus now looks lush and green, with hundreds of trees and a large central pond.


Lady Gaga's performance would in all likelihood be a private event for Apple employees.


This article, "Apple Park Decorated With Rainbow Colors in Celebration of Steve Jobs and Formal Opening of Campus" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Mysterious Apple Park Arch is for a May 17 Event Celebrating Steve Jobs and Formal Apple Park Opening

A curious stage with a rainbow-colored arch was spotted yesterday in drone footage we shared of the Apple Park campus, leading to speculation about what it might be for.

As it turns out, the arch, which is in the rainbow colors of the original Mac logo, is for an upcoming May 17 employee event that will celebrate the formal opening of Apple Park and serve as a tribute to Steve Jobs, who conceptualized the spaceship-like design of the main building on the campus prior to his death.


Details on the event and an interview with Apple design chief Jony Ive were shared by Cult of Mac after the site obtained a copy of internal information about the project that was originally shared with Apple employees.

Jony Ive's design team created the multicolored arch in partnership with a custom concert staging company, and conceptualizing the design took months of work. It's made from 30 unique machined components that make it easy to build up and take down for special events, but there are 25,000 parts in all including the structure itself and the metal skeleton underneath.


According to Ive, the overall goal was to "create a stage that would become immediately recognizable as the Apple Stage." The rainbow color was chosen because it's "been part of [Apple's] identify for many years."

Ive also said that the rainbow's presence is "keenly felt in many places" and that at the end of the day, it's "hard to find somebody that doesn't love a rainbow."
There is the resonance with the rainbow logo that's been part of our identity for many years. The rainbow is also a positive and joyful expression of some of our inclusion values and I think that one of the primary reasons the idea resonated so immediately and so profoundly with us was the form -- the connection from an aesthetic design point of view. A semi-circle relates so beautifully and naturally to the form of the ring.
The arch was created to be a three-dimensional object able to be "appreciated in the round" rather than just the front.
If you look at a plan view of Apple Park, the rainbow occupies an almost insignificant area. But it has a relevance and impact that is disproportionate to the area it occupies.

My space in Apple Park is on the external part of the perimeter. But I can see the rainbow reflected in the ceiling all the way through to where I sit. That truly wasn't planned but one of those lucky accidents.

We had planned the way in which the colors interplay between the discrete bands of the rainbow throughout the day making it more vital and fluid. There are some wonderful but subtle combinations and reflections.
It sounds like the rainbow arch won't be a permanent fixture at the campus, but will be able to be removed and put back up for various events hosted at Apple Park.

There are no details on Apple's May 17 event for employees, but MacRumors was told that there will be a big name artist performing at the event. Apple's Apple Park Visitor's Center will be closed on May 17 due to the event.


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Apple Park Campus Shown Off in New Drone Video, Mystery Stage Included

While Apple Park was being constructed, drone pilots like Duncan Sinfield followed Apple's progress on the buildings and landscaping, allowing us to see the campus as work progressed.

Apple Park has been done for some time now and drone videos have largely stopped, but Duncan Sinfield stopped by Apple Park this morning and captured a great-looking drone video that we thought we'd share with MacRumors readers.


The main ring-shaped building has all of its completed landscaping, and the video also shows off auxiliary buildings like the Steve Jobs Theater and on-campus parking structures. Hundreds of trees cover the interior and exterior of the ring-shaped building, and there's a large central pond. Everything is looking lush and green thanks to heavy rains in the Bay Area over the course of the last few months.

Of particular interest is an event stage with a rainbow arch and multiple lights that's located right in the middle of the campus. It's not clear what this is for, but it's likely an upcoming employee-only concert event of some sort, as visitors to the site aren't allowed onto the campus.

There's no word right now on what the event might be, but Apple often hosts beer bashes and other employee events at Apple Park.


This article, "Apple Park Campus Shown Off in New Drone Video, Mystery Stage Included" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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New Apple Park Drone Videos Spot Workers Cleaning Window Shades, Increased Landscaping, and More

Drone videographers Duncan Sinfield and Matthew Roberts each uploaded new videos to their YouTube channels over the past day, covering the latest views of Apple Park from the sky. The videos come a few hours ahead of Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference, which is happening about 8 miles to the east of Apple Park at the McEnery Convention Center in San Jose.

Image via Matthew Roberts/Maverick Imagery

In Cupertino, the company's ringed campus "continues to evolve," according to Sinfield. For June 2018, this means that around 9,000 trees have now been permanently planted around the campus, employees are continuing to relocate onto the site "every week," and cleaning crews are working twenty-four hours a day to maintain the central spaceship building and the structures surrounding it, "including washing the window shades at least once per week."

At around the two minute mark in his video, Sinfield spots a few Apple Park workers doing just that.


Roberts also catches a few workers cleaning the window shades in the central courtyard of the spaceship building, pointing out that he has seen "notable changes" in the "amount of detail paid to keeping the spaceship clean" and in the expansion of greenery around the campus. Otherwise, Roberts catches nice glimpses into Apple Park's main atrium, the employees' outdoor activity area with basketball courts, and the stairs that lead down into the underground portion of the Steve Jobs Theater.


Drone video updates from videographers like Sinfield and Roberts have become slightly less frequent as Apple Park finally ends construction after beginning just over four years ago in December 2013. Additionally, in April 2018 Sinfield said that it has become increasingly difficult to fly his drones over the campus due to increased security, believing it's "only a matter of time until the campus becomes shut-off to drones completely."

In the summer of 2017, multiple reports emerged about Apple Park security's first efforts at stopping drone pilots from accessing the airspace above the campus. Despite those attempts, drone update videos kept being uploaded to YouTube by multiple videographers, mainly including Sinfield and Roberts. Apple's renewed anti-drone efforts in the spring of 2018 appear to have been a bit more strict, however, and followed a leaked memo from the company that warned employees against leaking details about future devices to the media.


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Drone Videographer Duncan Sinfield: ‘Only a Matter of Time’ Until Apple Park Shuts Down Drone Flights

Duncan Sinfield says that piloting his drones over Apple Park has become increasingly difficult in the past few weeks, and that he believes it's "only a matter of time until the campus becomes shut-off to drones completely." Sinfield's comment on Apple Park security comes in the text description of a new video that he uploaded today, where he talks about the response that he's been getting to drone piloting over the campus.


The drone videographer says that security "generally responds" to his precise takeoff location "in 10 minutes or less." He speculates that Apple has set up a geofence of some kind and that the company could be tracking all drone flights near the campus in an effort to lower the amount of eyes on Apple Park. He further guesses that Apple might be using technology from a company like Dedrone, which describes itself as "the airspace security platform that detects, classifies, and mitigates all drone threats.​"
This is an extended length video, it's only a matter of time until the campus becomes shut-off to drones completely... with a geo-fence, or something similar. Security at Apple Park generally responds in two white Prius's to my precise take-off locations in 10 minutes or less. While this is speculation, my instincts tell me that Apple is tracking all drones in the vicinity of the campus with sophisticated radio frequency technology from companies such as DeDrone (a San Francisco-based aerospace security company).

As always, I respect all requests by Apple Security to land my drone and leave the area when asked to do so. They are always asking if I'm an Apple employee too. So to all of the Apple Employees watching (and reading), don't fly your drones over The Park, it's frowned upon!
Last summer, multiple reports emerged about Apple Park security's first efforts at stopping drone pilots from accessing the airspace above the campus. Despite those attempts, drone update videos have been consistently uploaded to YouTube by multiple videographers, including Sinfield and Matthew Roberts. Apple Park's latest stance on drones appears to be a bit more strict this time around, and follows a recently leaked memo from the company that warned employees against leaking details about future devices to the media.

Besides the security-focused topic of the description, Sinfield's video today is an extended update providing the usual coverage of Apple Park. The campus looks essentially complete except for a few remaining dirt mounds and empty landscaping areas outside of the main spaceship building and near the Steve Jobs Theater. Apple Park has become increasingly busy since more employees began moving in earlier this year, with the campus providing a backdrop for executive interviews as well as housing CEO Tim Cook's own office.

In another drone video posted back in February, Matthew Roberts captured a drone that malfunctioned and crashed among the solar panels covering the roof of Apple Park.


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New Footage Captures Drone Crash Over Apple Park

It's been well over two years since monthly drone updates have been shared online covering the construction progress of Apple's second campus in California, called Apple Park. Over the weekend, drone videographer Matthew Roberts posted his latest video on YouTube, but instead of covering the newest updates to the campus, the video captured a drone that malfunctioned and crashed over Apple Park.


Roberts said the crashed drone's operator got in touch with him, asking for help in locating the downed drone on Apple's new campus and sharing the footage from the crash with Roberts. The drone that crashed is said to be one of DJI's devices, so the owner was able to review a cached version of the video on the DJI app on their phone/tablet following the incident. "There were no signs of premature failure," the owner said, and it's still unclear why the drone malfunctioned.

Roberts eventually discovered the drone crashed among the solar panels on the roof of the main Apple Park building. The drone's owner has contacted Apple and notified them of the incident, and Roberts said that "it remains to be seen" if Apple will return the drone back to its owner. In the video, it appears that the drone has remained mostly intact following the crash.


In the latest monthly update of Apple Park shared by Roberts earlier in February, the new campus was described as seeing increased activity from employees now that more have moved in, with bicycles appearing throughout parking lots and on walkways. The maintenance facility has also been completed, but Apple is still working on landscaping in a large area located between the main building and Steve Jobs Theater.


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Apple’s Transition to New Headquarters Should Accelerate as More Occupancy Permits Granted

While some construction remains underway at Apple Park on both the inside and outside, an increasing number of Apple employees will likely transition to the company's new headquarters over the next few months.


VentureBeat reports that Apple received temporary occupancy permits for five of the 12 sections of the main circular building on the campus in late December. The report adds that Apple is on track to receive temporary occupancy permits for all of the other sections between late January and March at the latest.

The permits should accelerate the move-in process for some 12,000 employees that will eventually work out of Apple Park, with many coming from the company's nearby Infinite Loop campus, both of which are located in Cupertino, California.

Apple employees have generally remained quiet about the move, in line with the company's secretive culture, but a few mentions have surfaced on social media platforms like Twitter and Snapchat since early January. One employee tweeted that Wednesday was his last day at Apple's previous Infinite Loop headquarters.


Apple had already received temporary occupancy permits last year for certain sections of Apple Park that contain the restaurant and atrium. Permits were also granted for the Apple Park Visitor Center and Steve Jobs Theater, where Apple unveiled the iPhone X and will host its annual shareholders meeting next month.

Apple originally said its new headquarters would open last April, but at its September event, chief executive Tim Cook said employees would begin moving in later in the year, beyond some ancillary buildings already in use.

When construction wraps up at Apple Park, the headquarters should be able to receive permanent occupancy permits. For the latest progress update, watch this drone video shared by Duncan Sinfield earlier this month.


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New Apple Park Drone Video Captures Latest Construction Progress as 2018 Completion Date Nears

Drone videographer Matthew Roberts is continuing to capture footage of Apple's new headquarters, Apple Park, as construction on the campus grows nearer to completion. The latest video showcases a few finished amenities, like the dining terrace outside of the spaceship's atrium where employees can eat lunch.

Within the spaceship building, landscaping is said to be "nearly complete" and rows of trees can be seen surrounding the courtyard's finished central pond. The new video also captures a glimpse at the Visitor's Center, which was completed for the press to visit in September during the iPhone X event, and opened to the public this past November.


Some progress has been made on the entrance and exit road leading to the campus, with a security checkpoint added to the Wolfe Road entrance to Apple Park, placed in front of the underground tunnel.

Despite all of the finished buildings, areas of the campus are still riddled with construction equipment and dirt mounds, proving that Apple Park's long construction period isn't quite over yet. One of the main unfinished locations appears to be a large, empty area in front of the fitness center where landscaping needs to be completed.

When construction on Apple Park began in 2013, a completion date of Summer 2017 was set. Although employees began moving into the campus earlier in spring, it now appears that construction will finally be finished sometime in the early part of 2018.


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Apple Design Chief Jony Ive Discusses iPhone X and Apple Park in New Interview

Apple design chief Jony Ive recently sat down for an interview with Smithsonian Magazine, where he once again discussed his work on Apple's newest campus, Apple Park, and the latest flagship iPhone, the iPhone X.

As he mentioned in a prior interview, Ive is excited about the design space at Apple Park because it will allow the entire design team to work together. Industrial designers, font experts, motion graphics experts, and computer interface designers will be able to come together to interact in new ways and share ideas.


The design space will also feature several milling machines to create prototypes, which Ive believes are an integral part of the design process.
"I think you only really understand a material--its properties and attributes and, importantly, the opportunity the material allows--if you actually work it yourself," Ive says. "And the most remarkable point in the whole process is when you make the first model. We might like it, we might not, but the first model you make, everything changes."
On the subject of the iPhone X, Ive says its all-glass design and edge-to-edge display is something Apple "aspired to for years." In comparison, Ive critiqued older iPhone designs. "It now seems to me a rather disconnected component housed in an enclosure," he said of the iPhone 7 Plus.

The rest of the interview, which also includes anecdotes on Ive's childhood and the Apple Watch, can be read over on the Smithsonian website.

Along with his interview in Smithsonian Magazine, Ive today spoke about the future of design at the Hirshorn Museum in Washington, DC. The one-hour speaking engagement took place at 3:00 p.m. local time and appears to have covered many of the same topics that Ive spoke about in the interview.

Ive is also a 2017 honoree of the Smithsonian's American Ingenuity Awards, designed to honor revolutionary breakthroughs in the arts and sciences, education, and social progress.


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Nearly Completed Apple Park Campus Shown Off in New Drone Video

Work on Apple Park is nearing completion, and the latest drone video shared today by drone pilot Matthew Roberts shows off recent progress and finishing touches that are being put in place on buildings and outdoor areas.

Today's video features the now-completed Apple Park Visitor's Center, located across the street from the main ring-shaped building. The Visitor's Center, which boasts a huge carbon fiber roof and is made from the same materials that were used for the main building, opened last Friday.


The Visitor's Center features an indoor area with a replica of Apple Park that comes to life using an augmented reality app, a rooftop viewing deck that gives some obscured views of the main campus, a cafe that serves coffee, tea, and snacks, and an Apple Store that sells standard Apple products and some exclusive Apple Park gear like t-shirts, hats, tote bags, and postcards.

Progress has been made on the landscaping, with lush grass now planted outside of the cafeteria's enormous glass double doors, and the pond at the center of the campus has been filled with water. Outdoor food stations are nearing completion, and the solar panels on the roof of the ring-shaped building have all been installed. Apple Park will run entirely on renewable energy provided by the solar panels on the roof.

While much of the campus is complete, there's still some work to be done. Landscaping is still ongoing in the area near the employee fitness center, for example. Even though landscaping work is not finished, employees are already moving into Apple Park. At this pace, it appears construction could be largely wrapped up by early 2018.


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