Bidding on ‘Extremely Rare’ Apple I Manual From 1976 Reaches Nearly $10,000 at Auction

Back in 1976, Apple released its first computer, the Apple I. Over a span of about ten months, Apple co-founders Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs produced about 200 of the computers and sold some 175 of them, making it a valuable collector's item that has fetched up to $905,000 at auction in recent years.


As a testament to just how rare the computer is, an "extremely rare" Apple I operation manual alone is estimated to fetch over $10,000 at auction this week, with a most recent bid of $9,422 on the Boston-based RR Auctions website.

The vintage manual features Apple's original logo on the front cover, which depicts scientist Isaac Newton seated beneath a tree with a shining apple dangling overhead. The manual explains how to set up and use the Apple I and its monitor and includes a fold-out schematic of the system.


"Very few of the original Apple-1 operating manuals—perhaps 65 or so—are known to exist today," said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. He added that this makes the manual a "highly collectible piece from one of the most valuable and successful companies in the world."

The manual is said to be in "very good to fine condition," with light irregular grid-shaped toning to the front cover, a short tear to the top edge of the front cover, and a light circular stain inside the front cover.

Perhaps most interesting of all is the owner's message to prospective bidders:
I truly hate to sell it as The Manual is one of God's, I mean one of Woz's greatest gifts to nerdkind. Now I am not a greedy man and have enjoyed The Manual for nearly two decades, surviving two longer-than-they-should-have-lasted marriages and about 5 or 6 moves all over California. Alas, my time with this beautiful artifact has reached its end and I am now passing the torch to you.
Bids are open until July 10 at 7:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

Tag: Apple-1

This article, "Bidding on 'Extremely Rare' Apple I Manual From 1976 Reaches Nearly $10,000 at Auction" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Rare Apple-1 Headed to Auction in September

The latest Apple-related auction will kick off on September 25, offering bidders the chance to get their hands on a rare Apple-1 computer. On sale by RR Auction, the Apple-1 is fully operational and one of around 70 Apple-1 computers that remain of the first 200 built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976.

Executive vice president at RR Auction, Bobby Livingston, says that the Apple-1 originates from a person who purchased it at The Byte Shop, the store where Jobs and Wozniak originally sold the computers for $666.66. The owner learned BASIC on the computer, wrote small programs, and decided to hold onto the Apple-1 after it became outdated, "realizing it could one day be a piece of computing history." He then tried to sell the Apple-1 to Wozniak in 1982 for $10,000, which "went unanswered."


The new auction will start at $50,000, and is estimated to end between $300,000 and $400,000.
This Apple-1 computer was restored to its original, operational state in June 2018 by Apple-1 expert Corey Cohen, and a video of it running and functioning is available upon request. A comprehensive, technical condition report prepared by Cohen is available to qualified bidders; he evaluates the current condition of the unit as 8.5/10. The most remarkable aspect of this Apple-1 computer is that it is documented to be fully operational: the system was operated without fault for approximately eight hours in a comprehensive test.
Apple-1 computers have been up for auction a few times in the past few years, and the record auction price for an Apple-1 was established in 2016 when one of the computers sold for $815,000. That computer was the "Celebration" Apple-1 and was very rare due to its blank "green" PCB board that was never sold to the public and was not a part of a known production run. Slightly more common, publicly-sold units have recently sold for $130,000.

Additionally, the auction is being promoted with a unique digital "DNA" scan, performed by Invaluable with technology built by Artmyn. This technology scans artwork and objects like the Apple-1, capturing "tens of thousands of photographs" using various light sources and spectrums, including UV lights. The scan generates a "5D interactive file" and an immersive video that lets owners, auction houses, consignors, and buyers see greatly detailed angles, views, and textures for the scanned objects.
The video for the Apple-1 can be seen on Vimeo.
“We couldn’t be more excited about the sale of this historic piece of technology,” said Invaluable CEO Rob Weisberg. “The innovative scanning technology we’re showcasing is a giant step towards greater transparency in the art and collectibles market that we believe will increase buyer confidence in the online art market. To showcase it with an Apple-1 is just incredible and fitting.”

In the case of the Apple-1, the scan will allow a 5D look at the iconic desktop, offering zeroed-in views of distinguishing details on the top and bottom of the piece.
The auction for the Apple-1 will take place at 1 p.m. on September 25, 2018 at WeWorks in Boston.

Tag: Apple-1

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