Samsung’s Answer to AirDrop Finally Arrives With the Galaxy S20

Last month we reported that Samsung was working on its own AirDrop killer for Galaxy devices, called Quick Share. On Tuesday, the Korean company unveiled its new trio of Galaxy S20 phones, and we finally got a better idea of what the local file-sharing feature can do.


On the face of it, Quick Share works just like Apple's AirDrop, in that if you're near another user with a supported device, they will show up on your screen and you can share a picture, video, or file with them. Similarly, Galaxy users can also choose to receive files from anyone or only people in their contacts.

However, Quick Share has an added feature that AirDrop lacks – it allows you to share files with up to five people simultaneously. With AirDrop, you can only send to one recipient at a time.

It'll be interesting to see if Apple develops AirDrop further in response to Samsung's Quick Share feature, given that we already know Apple is continually looking to improve its ad-hoc file sharing service. The most recent addition to AirDrop's capabilities is "directional AirDrop," which allows users to point an iPhone 11 at another iPhone user to instantly share files with them.

The feature was made possible by the U1 Wideband chip included in ‌iPhone 11‌ devices that allows the distance between two Ultra Wideband devices to be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between the two devices.

airdrop
Apple says that the directional AirDrop feature is "just the beginning" of what is possible with Ultra Wideband, and says that "amazing new capabilities" are coming later.

The first Android smartphones with Ultra Wideband technology are expected to be released starting later in 2020. Meanwhile, Google is also working on its own AirDrop-like feature called Nearby Sharing for Pixel phones.
In addition, China's big three mobile vendors are working collectively on an AirDrop-style peer-to-peer transfer protocol that is expected to launch this month. All of which suggests the development of new close-proximity file-sharing features could well hot up between the big players in the coming years.

Quick Share is currently only available for the new Galaxy S20, S20+ and S20 Ultra 5G, but Samsung says support for other devices is coming soon.


This article, "Samsung's Answer to AirDrop Finally Arrives With the Galaxy S20" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Samsung’s Long-Awaited Answer to AirDrop Expected to Arrive Next Month

Samsung is said to be working on its own answer to AirDrop, Apple's ad-hoc service that lets users transfer files among Macs and iOS devices over Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

According to XDA Developers, "Quick Share" will work similarly to AirDrop, enabling files to be sent "instantly" between two Galaxy phones in close proximity, so long as both devices have the feature turned on.

Like AirDrop, Galaxy users will be able to restrict who can send them files (Everyone or Contacts Only). When users set Quick Share to Everyone, it's not clear if the service will present unsolicited file shares in the same way as AirDrop.
Unlike AirDrop, Quick Share is expected to have a temporary cloud-storage component that will allow users to transfer data to SmartThings connected home devices. The maximum size of these files will be up to 1GB with a total of 2GBs being sent per day.

AirDrop was introduced with iOS 7, so it might surprise some Apple users that Samsung is only getting round to finalizing its own alternative. Android used to have an NFC-based equivalent called Android Beam, but it was discontinued with Android 10. Users have had to resort to third-party alternatives like Google's Files Go app since.

China's big three mobile vendors Xiaomi, Oppo, and Vivo are also working collectively on an AirDrop-style peer-to-peer transfer protocol that is expected to launch next month.

Samsung's Quick Share service is expected to arrive with the launch of Galaxy S20+, which is slated for February 11, with the sharing service likely to come to older Samsung devices later on.

(Via The Verge.)


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Now-Fixed AirDrop Bug Let Anyone Lock-Up Nearby iPhones With Flood of Files

There was a serious AirDrop bug in iOS 13.2.3 that let attackers overwhelm nearby iPhones with files, causing them to lock up, reports TechCrunch. Apple addressed the bug in the iOS 13.3 update, and the details of how it works are now public.

AirDrop is designed to allow users to share files with one another, and depending on settings, it can be restricted to contacts, no one, or any nearby iPhone. Kishan Bagaria discovered the AirDrop bug in iOS 13.2.3, finding that he could lock up nearby iPhones that were able to accept files by flooding them with multiple files in a row.


When receiving an AirDrop file, an ‌iPhone‌ or iPad blocks the display until the incoming request is accepted or rejected. iOS did not limit the number of requests that a device can accept, so with repeated message requests, an attacker was able to send files over and over again to cause the iOS device to get stuck in a loop.

Devices with AirDrop set to "Everyone" were primarily vulnerable to the attack, which is not the default AirDrop setting. AirDrop is limited to Contacts, and the "Everyone" setting must be manually enabled.

As of now, though, the bug no longer works and Apple has limited the number of AirDrop messages that can be sent to an iOS device in quick succession. Given that this wasn't a traditional security vulnerability, Apple will not provide a common vulnerability and CVE score, but has instead acknowledged it in a separate section of the security support document.

Tag: AirDrop

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How to Prevent Unsolicited AirDrops to Your Apple Device

Since its introduction with iOS 7, AirDrop has become the favored means for iPhone and iPad users to instantly share photos, videos, documents, and more to nearby Apple devices over Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Using it to transmit content from apps like Photos and Safari couldn't be simpler, thanks to its top-level location in the iOS Share Sheet, accessed via the ubiquitous Share icon.

AirDrop is popular with all sorts of users, from teenagers who use it to flirt or share innocent memes in public places like concerts and festivals, to professionals who AirDrop project materials to each other across the office. Unfortunately, however, the way AirDrop currently works also leaves it wide open to abuse.

Technically, iOS doesn't allow just anyone to share a photo or document to your device unless you actively choose to accept it. The problem with AirDrop though is that it displays a preview of the proposed shared content on your device's screen, whether or not you actually want to see it.

Riders on New York City's subways often report being subjected to unsolicited nude images sent over AirDrop in this way. In fact the problem is so bad that NYC lawmakers introduced a bill last year that would make it illegal "for a person to send an unsolicited sexually explicit video or image to another person with intent to harass, annoy or alarm such other person."


But finding and prosecuting an AirDrop offender would be extremely difficult. The problem is that when someone attempts to send something to you over AirDrop, iOS identifies them by their device's name. However, the name of a device can be changed by its user at a moment's notice, which would make it almost impossible for the average user to know where the AirDropped content came from.

Protecting Yourself From AirDrop Harassment


To protect yourself from receiving unsolicited content in a public place, you could disable AirDrops to your device by turning off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, but this limits you unnecessarily when you consider that Apple lets you control who can see your device and send you content using AirDrop.

There are two active settings for AirDrop: You can set it to accept shares from anyone, or only from people whose email address or mobile number appears in your contacts. Alternately, you can turn off the feature completely. You can use these settings to ensure that you don't become the unwitting victim of an unsolicited AirDrop share. Keep reading to learn how.

How to Restrict AirDrop in iOS


  1. Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.

  2. Scroll down and tap General.

  3. Tap AirDrop.
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  4. Tap Contacts Only or Receiving Off.

How to Restrict AirDrop via Control Center


You can also set your AirDrop options in Control Center. Here's how:
  1. Open Control Center on your device in the following way: On an iPad with a Home button, double-tap the Home button; on iPhone 8 or earlier, swipe up from the bottom of the screen; and on a 2018 iPad Pro or iPhone X/XR/XS/XS Max, swipe down from the upper right of the screen.

  2. Press firmly or touch and hold the network settings card in the upper-left corner.

  3. Tap AirDrop.

  4. Tap Contacts Only or Receiving Off.

How to Restrict AirDrop in macOS


If you've been the victim of AirDrop harassment on a Mac at work (in an open plan office, for instance) here's how to restrict who can share content with you in macOS.
  1. Open a Finder window on your Mac.

  2. Select AirDrop from the Finder sidebar (if AirDrop isn't listed, use the keyboard combination Command-Shift-R to open it.

  3. Click the setting prefaced with Allow me to be discovered by: and select Contacts Only or Receiving Off from the drop-down menu.
If you're a regular user of AirDrop in macOS and regularly open it in Finder, consider adding an AirDrop shortcut to your Dock for one-click access to it from any screen.

Tag: AirDrop

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How to Add an AirDrop Shortcut to Your Mac’s Dock

Apple's AirDrop feature lets you wirelessly send and receive files between nearby Macs as well as to and from local iOS devices. It's usually accessed from the sidebar of an open Finder Window (or using the Command + Shift + R keyboard shortcut within Finder), but here we're going to share with you a trick that enables you to launch AirDrop straight from your Mac's Dock.

Having the AirDrop shortcut in your Dock will allow you to access it from any screen, regardless of the application you're using, and without having to open a Finder window first. Regular AirDrop users in particular should appreciate the convenience it provides.
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