Apple Promotes Multiple Senior Directors to Vice President Roles

Over the course of the last few weeks, Apple has promoted several of its senior directors and given them vice president titles, reports Bloomberg.

Paul Meade has been promoted to vice president of hardware engineering, while Jon Andrews is Apple's new vice president of software engineering. Meade has been leading hardware development for Apple's future augmented reality headset, while Andrews oversees the architecture of Apple's operating systems under Craig Federighi.


Gary Geaves, who runs audio technology development for AirPods and HomePod, has been named to a new acoustics vice president role, and Kaiann Drance, who was on stage during the iPhone 11 announcement, is now a vice president of marketing, reporting to Greg Joswiak.

Bob Borchers, a former iPhone executive who worked at Google and Dolby, has also returned to Apple to take on a vice president of marketing role. Borchers was around for the early days of the iPhone, serving as a spokesperson and appearing in Apple tutorial videos about the device.

According to Bloomberg, he will now oversee iOS, iCloud, and privacy marketing matters, also under Greg Joswiak.

None of these new appointments made Apple's Leadership page, which is reserved primarily for senior vice presidents and some key VP roles. In total, Apple has around 100 vice presidents who report to its executive team.


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Review: Mophie’s Latest Wireless Chargers Will Juice Up Multiple Devices at Once, But Are Expensive

Mophie earlier this year came out with several multi-device charging solutions after Apple failed to deliver the AirPower. The $80 Dual Wireless Charging Pad can charge two devices at one time, while the 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Pad ($140) is designed to charge an iPhone, Apple Watch, and AirPods all at once.

Design wise, these chargers are fairly simple, made from a black plastic covered with a suede-like fabric for grip and protection from scratches. Mophie also makes a version that's a glossy black plastic for those that don't like the ultrasuede look, and it's sold on the Apple online store.


I'm not a huge fan of the suede because of the way that it can look discolored depending on the lay of the fabric, but it's a clean enough design and the suede keeps the devices properly in place while charging. I'm also not sure the black plastic is the best material given the price of these chargers, but again, there's nothing wrong with it. It's simple and clean, if a bit boring.

The Dual Wireless Charging Pad is a simple oblong charging pad that houses a single iPhone in landscape orientation or two iPhones positioned in portrait orientation. There's a line on each side, directing users where to place each iPhone for proper charging positioning.


The bottom features a rubber ring for stability on a desk or a table, and there's a port for the charging cable and an additional spot to plug in another USB-A cable, such as a cable for charging an ‌Apple Watch‌. Both of Mophie's chargers come with rather large power bricks that offer enough power to charge multiple devices.


The 3-in-1 Wireless Charger has a similar design with the same black suede base and a dedicated spot for each device. The right side, which is flat, is meant to charge an iPhone, while there's an indentation where ‌AirPods‌ are meant to lie. This indentation was designed for the original ‌AirPods‌, so the AirPods Pro's Wireless Charging Case is not a perfect fit, but it does charge when placed in the indentation.


Above the indentation for the ‌AirPods‌, there's a little ‌Apple Watch‌ charging puck that's actually a detachable piece that you need to snap into place, which isn't my favorite design. It's easy to get in the right area, and I suppose it's there so you can remove it and charge something else, but it seemed to give me charging issues.


I had a problem where I needed to take it out and reseat it a few times to get my ‌Apple Watch‌ to charge right. I also noticed that at times, I have to take the ‌Apple Watch‌ off of the charger multiple times to get it to start charging, which is not ideal. I didn't have issues with charging the iPhone on either charger, though, and the ‌AirPods‌ also charged fine.

The charging puck does allow the ‌Apple Watch‌ to be put in Nightstand mode, so you can glance over and see the time if it's at your bedside. Both charging pads feature LED lights at the front so you can make sure a given device is charging properly

Mophie's wireless chargers offer 7.5W charging speeds for Apple devices, including after the iOS 13 patch that seems to have limited some 7.5W wireless chargers to 5W instead of 7.5W.


With the 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Pad, the iPhone XS Max charged from zero to 23 percent after a half an hour, and 43 percent after an hour. The iPhone 11 Pro Max charged to 21 percent after a half hour and 38 percent after an hour, which is in line with other 7.5W wireless chargers.

I saw similar charging speeds from the Dual Wireless Charging Pad, which charged the ‌iPhone XS‌ Max to 21 percent after a half an hour and 42 percent after an hour. The ‌iPhone 11 Pro Max‌ charged to 22 percent after 30 minutes and 38 percent after an hour.

Bottom Line


Mophie's charging products are always good quality and are typically reliable, but Mophie is known for its premium pricing and these wireless chargers are no exception.

The Dual Wireless Charging Pad is $80 and the 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Pad is $140, which is a lot to ask, even if it is in line with other higher-end wireless products like those from Nomad.


At these price points, it's difficult to flat out recommend Mophie's chargers, and with the 3-in-1 in particular, I have reservations because of the ‌Apple Watch‌ charging issues I experienced. There's nothing that makes these wireless chargers stand out from other similar options on the market, which is disappointing.

I like Mophie's products for the most part, but given the build quality, pricing, and charging issues, the Dual Wireless Charging Pad and the 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Pad feel like a bit of a miss. Mophie does sometimes have sales, so if you can get these at a cheaper price point, they're a whole lot more appealing. Otherwise, I'd recommend shopping around for a better deal.

How to Buy


The Dual Wireless Charging Pad and the 3-in-1 Wireless Charging Pad can be purchased from the Zagg website for $80 and $140, respectively.

Note: Mophie provided MacRumors with a 3-in-1 Wireless Charger and Dual Wireless Charger for the purpose of this review. No other compensation was received. MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these Mophie. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Tags: Mophie, Zagg

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Complaints Mounting About iOS 13.2 Being ‘More Aggressive at Killing Background Apps and Tasks’

A growing number of iPhone and iPad users have complained about poor RAM management on iOS 13 and iPadOS 13, leading to apps like Safari, YouTube, and Overcast reloading more frequently upon being reopened. We've lightly edited some of the comments to correct things like capitalization.


MacRumors forum member Rogifan:
I was watching a video in YouTube on my iPhone 11 Pro. I pause the video to respond to a text message. I was in iMessage for less than one minute. When I returned to YouTube it reloaded the app and I lost the video I was watching. I noticed this a lot on my iPad Pro too. Apps and Safari tabs reloading a lot more frequently than they did in iOS 12. Very annoying.
MacRumors forum member Radon87000, using an ‌iPad Pro‌ on ‌iPadOS‌ 13.2:
I was working on a spreadsheet in Excel and I switched to a YouTube video for like 10 mins or so and when I switched back, the app was no longer in memory. Not just that, it also flushed all Safari tabs out of memory too. None of the games are staying in memory after 20 mins.
MacRumors forum member HappyDude20:
iOS 12 was perfect and [I] miss it for the main reason that any time I use the app switcher to go back to my previous app such as Safari or Instagram or Facebook or anything really, the app refreshes. Back in iOS 12 I could go back [to] multiple app[s] and it wouldn't refresh. It was perfect. I'm running on an iPhone 7 Plus if it makes any difference but feel it shouldn't.
Based on anecdotal comments from affected users, the issue appears to have become worse as of iOS 13.2 and ‌iPadOS‌ 13.2. Artist, designer, and developer Nick Heer wrote this on his blog yesterday:
I'm used to the camera purging all open apps from memory on my iPhone X, but iOS 13.2 goes above and beyond in killing background tasks. Earlier today, I was switching between a thread in Messages and a recipe in Safari and each app entirely refreshed every time I foregrounded it. This happens all the time throughout the system in ‌iOS 13‌: Safari can't keep even a single tab open in the background, every app boots from scratch, and using iOS feels like it has regressed to the pre-multitasking days.
On his blog, developer Michael Tsai has rounded up similar complaints on Twitter.

Marco Arment:
I've noticed this since the first 13.2 betas, and Overcast users keep reporting it as well: background apps seem to be getting killed MUCH more aggressively than before.

(Especially on the iPhone 11 if you use the camera, presumably because it needs so much RAM for processing.)
Christopher Stephens:
Every single app on my iPhone 7 iOS 13.2 gets killed every time I close. No backgrounding. And each tab on safari when I move to a new one. So frustrating
Cabel Sasser:
This really affected Prompt. Extremely annoying to lose SSH connections when switch apps.

In yesterday's update we rolled out a semi-cheesy but effective fix: "Connection Keeper" keeps a running GPS-based log of where you connect to servers. Side effect: connections stay alive.
More complaints are found in this Twitter thread, in this Reddit thread, in the Apple Support Communities, and elsewhere on the web.


Affected users are hoping this issue can be resolved in a future software update. We've reached out to Apple for comment.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Deals: Amazon Discounts Refurbished 2018 MacBook Pros and Adorama Introduces Low Price on iPhone XR Smart Battery Case

New sales have rolled out this Halloween, with Amazon marking down a selection of refurbished MacBook Pro models from 2018 and Adorama introducing the lowest price we've seen on Apple's iPhone XR Smart Battery Case.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Refurbished 15-Inch MacBook Pro (2018)


Amazon has a trio of refurbished 15-inch MacBook Pro models from 2018, with prices starting at $1,779.99. These sales are for the high-end configurations with 16GB RAM and Intel Core i7 processors, with savings reaching as high as $709 off the original prices of these models.

Amazon's "renewed" products are promised to work and look like new, and have been inspected and tested by Amazon-qualified suppliers. Each MacBook Pro comes with a 90-day guarantee, so if you aren't satisfied you can return the computer during that period.

iPhone XR Smart Battery Case


If you're on the hunt for a Smart Battery Case for the iPhone XR, Adorama has marked down this accessory to the low price of $99.99, down from $129.00. At $29 off, this is the lowest price we've seen the iPhone XR Smart Battery Case at any of the major Apple resellers.


Apple's Smart Battery Case increases talk time up to 39 hours, Internet use up to 22 hours, and video playback up to 27 hours. It's also compatible with Qi-certified wireless chargers, so you'll be able to refuel the case and your iPhone at the same time. Head to Adorama to check out the sale before it ends.

Also note that the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max versions of this accessory are on sale for $102 on Amazon right now.

Head to our full Deals Roundup for a more detailed look at all of the latest Apple-related sales going on this week.

Related Roundup: Apple Deals

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Apple Said to Receive 16-Inch MacBook Pro Shipments This Quarter, Launch Timing Remains Unclear

While it is unclear if the widely rumored 16-inch MacBook Pro will launch in 2019 or 2020, the latest report from DigiTimes claims that Apple will begin receiving volume shipments of the notebook in the fourth quarter of this year. Taiwan-based manufacturer Quanta Computer is said to be the key supplier.

The report reiterates that the 16-inch MacBook Pro will have an ultra-thin-bezel design, suggesting the overall size of the notebook might be similar to the existing 15-inch MacBook Pro despite having a larger display.

16-inch MacBook Pro concept by MacRumors

Apple receiving volume shipments of the 16-inch MacBook Pro in the fourth quarter does not necessarily mean the notebook will launch in the fourth quarter. Apple may simply be planning to stockpile the 16-inch MacBook Pro ahead of the U.S. government's proposed 15 percent import tariff on an additional round of Chinese goods, including notebooks, slated to take effect December 15.

Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo originally said the 16-inch MacBook Pro would launch in the fourth quarter of 2019 with an all-new design, including a scissor switch keyboard. As of late, however, Kuo has more vaguely stated that a "new MacBook model" with a scissor keyboard will launch in mid 2020. It's unclear if the "new MacBook model" that Kuo has referred to more recently is the 16-inch MacBook Pro.

Multiple images corresponding to a 16-inch MacBook Pro have been found in macOS Catalina in recent weeks, including one that reveals that Touch ID will likely be separated from the Touch Bar on the notebook.


The leaked Touch Bar design lends credence to the Esc key also being a separate, physical key again, as can be seen when zooming in to the previously leaked 16-inch MacBook Pro icon.


MacRumors has confirmed the location of the Touch Bar image in macOS Catalina. The filename includes "Device16."


DigiTimes previously said the 16-inch MacBook Pro would launch by the end of October, and today is the final day of the month. The site does not have the best track record when it comes to the timing of new Apple products, but its connections within Apple's supply chain are occasionally accurate.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Caution)

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Apple Did Buy Rights to ‘AirTag’ Trademark, Source Confirms

Apple has bought the "AirTag" trademark for its rumored item tracking device from a Russian group of companies that specializes in RFID technology, according to a Russian media outlet.


RBC reports that a group called ISBC, which describes itself as "The leading smart card and RFID tag manufacturer in Russia," recently sold Apple the "AirTag" trademark as part of an agreement that would see the group develop its products under a single brand, according to a source familiar with the details of the transaction.

In a statement posted on the ISBC website today, the group confirmed that it had completed a transaction to transfer the rights to the "AirTag" trademark, but said that details about buyer would not be disclosed under the terms of confidentiality.
ISBC® group of companies have decided to bet on enhancing development of its own products under a single namesake trademark ISBC®. This rebranding decision is very much conditioned by international deal on assignment of the trademark AIRTAG®.

[...]

Transfer of RFID keyfobs from AIRTAG® brand to our flagship one - ISBC® - evidences our confidence in future of the product and solutions related. Confidentiality agreed does not allow us to disclose the deal in detail. But we may express our confidence the the future of AIRTAG® trademark we have envisaged and registered internationally will be bright, the whole world will learn and love the new product so named.
On Monday, the public release of iOS 13.2 revealed information suggesting Apple may be planning to call its rumored Tile-like item tracking accessory "AirTags."

Looking into the status of trademark activity surrounding the term, MacRumors came across some curious recent developments that could be signs of Apple acquiring the trademark rights, although a smoking gun concretely linking Apple to the activity was unavailable at the time.

Apple is rumored to be working on Tile-like Bluetooth trackers that can be used to keep track of items that are often lost, such as keys, wallets, and more.


Multiple rumors have confirmed Apple's work on ‌‌AirTags‌‌, which are expected, based on leaked assets, to be little round circles that can be attached to your items to make them locatable through the Find My app right alongside your Apple devices.

‌‌AirTags‌‌ will connect to iPhones, iPads, Macs, and more via Bluetooth, and will leverage the ultra-wideband U1 chip in the newest iPhones for more precise indoor tracking that's unmatched by competitors.

As we found earlier this year, there will also be an augmented reality component that will let you use your device's camera to pinpoint exactly where a lost item might be. Longer-range tracking will also be available, and ‌‌AirTags‌‌ will likely take advantage of the offline crowd-sourced tracking feature that was added in ‌iOS 13‌.

There is no word on when ‌‌AirTags‌‌ will be released, but given that Apple has been adding new details to each beta, there's a possibility that the accessories are coming this year, perhaps even quite soon.

(Thanks, Sergey!)

Tag: AirTags

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AirPods Pro Teardown: Heavier Than Original AirPods, Different Battery, Same Zero Repairability Score

iFixit today shared a teardown of the new $249 AirPods Pro, and perhaps unsurprisingly, the organization awarded Apple's latest wireless earphones the same zero repairability score as both versions of original AirPods.


Apart from the replaceable $4-a-pair proprietary silicone tips that provide noise isolation and enhanced fit on the ‌AirPods Pro‌, it's the same story as Apple's previous generation ‌AirPods‌ as far as repairs go. But there were a couple of new tidbits of information that the disassembly did reveal.

In terms of weight, each AirPod Pro bud comes in at 0.19 oz (5.4 g), which is fully a third heavier than the prior version AirPod earbuds. The new charging case is also notably chunkier, weighing 1.61 oz (45.6 g), compared to the original case's 1.34 oz (38 g).

ifixit
iFixit also discovered a watch-style button cell battery inside each AirPod, replacing the pin-type battery found in the original ‌AirPods‌. iFixit notes this could be the same battery found in Samsung's Galaxy Buds, and those are replaceable, but Apple has tethered the battery to a soldered cable, so ‌AirPods‌ customers will have no such luck.

As noted by iFixit, Apple apparently confirmed on Wednesday that the new ‌AirPods Pro‌ are no more repairable than previous versions of the wireless earbuds because of their size and build process.



For its part, however, iFixit believes Apple could theoretically replace the in-ear portion of the earbuds and re-use the original stems – which include the System on Package (SiP), antennas, microphones, and Force sensor – but the company has chosen not to do so, for whatever reason. iFixit's teardown concludes:
While theoretically semi-serviceable, the non-modular, glued-together design and lack of replacement parts makes repair both impractical and uneconomical.
From a customer perspective, this means that once the battery dies in the ‌AirPods Pro‌, it will need to be completely replaced. The left and right AirPod cost $89 each to replace in the United States, totaling $178 for a pair.

However, the fees are lower if a customer has purchased AppleCare+ for Headphones. The plan costs $29 upfront, plus charges a $29 fee to replace a pair of damaged ‌AirPods Pro‌ or their case. This coverage applies for up to two years from the date ‌AppleCare‌+ is purchased and is limited to two incidents.

Related Roundup: AirPods Pro
Buyer's Guide: AirPods Pro (Buy Now)

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How to Delete Siri Audio History and Opt Out of Siri Audio Sharing on HomePod

This article explains how to delete your Siri audio interaction history and opt out of sharing audio recordings with Apple on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Earlier this year, it was discovered that Apple hired contractors to listen to a small percentage of anonymized ‌Siri‌ recordings to evaluate the virtual assistant's responses with the purpose of improving accuracy and reliability.

The Guardian revealed that Apple employees working on ‌Siri‌ often heard confidential details while listening to the audio recordings. Apple was subsequently criticized for not making it clear to customers that some of their ‌Siri‌ recordings were being used to improve the service.

Soon after the report, Apple suspended its ‌Siri‌ grading practices and promised users that it would introduce tools in a forthcoming update that would allow them to opt out of sharing their audio recordings.

With the release of iOS 13.2 in October, those new tools arrived on iPhone and ‌iPad‌, allowing users to delete their ‌Siri‌ and Dictation history and opt out of sharing audio recordings. With the release of the 13.2.1 software update for HomePod, the same tools are also available for Apple's smart speaker.

It's important to note that ‌HomePod‌'s ‌Siri‌ settings are independent from your iOS device's ‌Siri‌ settings, so if you want to opt out of ‌Siri‌ Audio Sharing and delete your ‌Siri‌ audio history completely, you'll have to disable them separately.

The following steps show you how to access these settings on ‌HomePod‌. To learn how to disable them on iPhone, ‌iPad‌, and ‌iPod touch‌, click here.

How to Opt Out of ‌Siri‌ Audio Sharing on ‌HomePod‌


  1. Launch the Home app on your iPhone, ‌iPad‌, or ‌iPod touch‌.

  2. Press and hold the ‌HomePod‌ button in your Favorite Accessories. If it's not in your Favorites, tap the Rooms icon at the bottom of the screen and select the Room where your ‌HomePod‌ is located using the room selector in the top-left corner of the screen.
    home
  3. Tap the cog icon in the bottom-right corner of the ‌HomePod‌ card to take you to the device's settings.

  4. Tap Analytics & Improvements.

  5. If you don't want to let Apple review your recordings, toggle off the switch next to Improve ‌Siri‌ & Dictation.
    home
Note that you can tap the link under the toggle for more information relating to Apple's ‌Siri‌ analytics policy.

How to Delete Your ‌Siri‌ Audio History on ‌HomePod‌


  1. Launch the Home app on your iPhone, ‌iPad‌, or ‌iPod touch‌.

  2. Press and hold the ‌HomePod‌ button in your Favorite Accessories. If it's not in your Favorites, tap the Rooms icon at the bottom of the screen and select the Room where your ‌HomePod‌ is located using the room selector in the top-left corner of the screen.
    home
  3. Tap the cog icon in the bottom-right corner of the ‌HomePod‌ card to take you to the device's settings.

  4. Tap ‌Siri‌ History.
    home
  5. Tap Delete ‌Siri‌ History.
Apple will inform you that your request was received and that your ‌Siri‌ and dictation history will be deleted. That's all there is to it.

In addition to these new ‌Siri‌ and Dictation-related privacy features, Apple also says it is making further changes to its human grading process that will minimize the amount of data that reviewers have access to.

Related Roundup: HomePod
Tags: Siri, privacy
Buyer's Guide: HomePod (Neutral)

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Apple’s CFO Suggests iPad Pro Won’t Be Refreshed in 2019

Apple's chief financial officer Luca Maestri has provided a clue that the iPad Pro might not be refreshed in 2019.


Speaking on Apple's earnings call this afternoon, Maestri said that Apple's revenue guidance for the holiday quarter accounts for the fact that the iPad Pro will have different launch timing on a year-over-year basis. Apple's holiday quarter runs from late September through the end of December.

In other words, while Apple refreshed its iPad Pro lineup in October 2018, Maestri is suggesting that there will not be another iPad Pro refresh until at least 2020 and that Apple has factored that decision into its guidance.

While multiple reports indicated that Apple planned to refresh the iPad Pro this October, it is unlikely with only one full day left in the month. One report did claim the iPad Pro will be updated in March 2020, a common month for an Apple event, and that timeframe is looking more likely in light of Maestri's comments.

The next iPad Pro models are expected to feature 3D sensing added to the rear-facing camera system, which could be expanded to three lenses like iPhone 11 Pro models. On a speculative note, the iPad Pro could also potentially beat iPhone 12 models to 5G, in line with the iPad gaining LTE support before the iPhone in 2012.

March 2020 would make sense given the 12.9-inch iPad Pro has been refreshed once every 18 months or so on average. A refresh this fall would have been around only 12 months after the October 2018 refresh. But, nothing is for certain.

Related Roundup: iPad Pro

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Apple Releases Updated 13.2.1 Software for HomePod After 13.2 Update Bricked Some Devices

Apple today released a new 13.2.1 software update for the HomePod, which comes a few days after the 13.2 update. Shortly after Apple's 13.2 ‌HomePod‌ software was released, complaints of bricked devices surfaced.

Multiple users complained that the update rendered their HomePods nonfunctional, locking it into a boot loop, especially after resetting the device or removing it from the Home setup after installing the update.


Apple pulled the 13.2 software after a few hours, and warned customers against resetting their HomePods or removing them from the Home app.

The new 13.2.1 version of the software presumably does not feature the same bricking issue, and its release notes are the same as the 13.2 update:
iOS 13.2.1 provides support for new ‌‌HomePod‌‌ features:

- The ability for ‌‌HomePod‌‌ to recognize the voices of different family members to provide a personalized experience
- Handoff music, podcasts, or phone calls by bringing your iPhone close to ‌‌HomePod‌‌
- Add music to your ‌HomeKit‌ scenes
- Play relaxing high-quality soundtracks with Ambient Sounds
- Set sleep timers to fall asleep to music or Ambient Sounds
The new ‌‌HomePod‌‌ software will be installed automatically on the ‌‌HomePod‌‌, but you can also manually update and check your software version by following the instructions in our HomePod software how to.

Customers who did install the 13.2 update and ended up with a bricked ‌HomePod‌ will need to contact Apple for a replacement unit.

Related Roundup: HomePod
Buyer's Guide: HomePod (Neutral)

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